Clinical Groups? Please tell me they change!! - page 3

Hey all this is my 1st post here I started clinicals 2 weeks ago and im scared to death! For 1 I got the jacked up clinical group we are talking LOSERS I dont even know how these people made it this... Read More

  1. by   SoulShine75
    Ours is according to where you live and most of the time the people change but I still have clinical with some of the same people I did in the beginning. I must say though, you might end up liking some of these people or counting on the for help sometimes. Give them a chance.

    Peace.
  2. by   Future_Nurse_Natalie
    I find it very hard to be sympathetic toward your situation. With someone as new as you are and I'm guessing, not really knowing anybody, you sure are quick to assume your fellow classmates are "losers". But then, I guess we can expect a comment like that from someone named "SamytheCool".

    My advice: grow to love your classmates as family b/c ultimately you should be there for them no matter what. You all are going through the most difficult years of your college life and if you start acting like that from the get go then you can be sure you won't have any back-up when you need it.

    That being said: Get over yourself, stop acting like you're in high school and take some time to figure out who they really are before you assume they're losers. Otherwise, you can find yourself up to your elbows in crap with a patient and no one will be there to help you change the brief.
  3. by   RN BSN 2009
    Ours changes every semester.
  4. by   burn out
    WOW what a great learning experience you have ahead of you. Nursing is a team sport and you will have to learn to count on your team players..even the biggest loser can be your greatest helper. When you get in the real world of nursing you do not get to pick and choose who you work with and most of the time you are joyful just to have a full team working..you do not get to forfiet if you are short of players. Just kick back and enjoy the ride you are all in this together and yeah...love the one your with.
  5. by   Sue7573
    Quote from PralineLPN
    I had the same problem with a few of my clinical groups. Luckily, ours changed for each rotation. For my last group before graduation, I had the lazy one, the pushy one, the one who freaked out over everything, and the whiner. I had one good classmate in there. I really have no idea how they will survive in a real job. I feel bad for their future preceptor. Makes my sudder to think about it, actually. I agree with ktwlpn, though, you'll look way good. And, for the record, I did try to be non-judgemental, but they were truly just plain sub-standard.
    You got a label on everyone, non-judgemental, hmmmm-----ok so the one label I didn't see was the ignorant one... wonder who that is....



    I have to say that in the beginning of my nursing school, I was a little bit judgemental also. I groaned and moaned about having to deal with the weird ones in clinicals, as time passed, and I met with or worked with each person I realized that it was my own insecurities that caused me to cast judgement so fast. Now there are people that I would rather not work with or socialize with but I am proud to be a part of this class and can honestly say that every single one of the people in my class of 64 students would have my back as I would have theirs in a heart beat.

    Sue
  6. by   burn out
    Quote from PralineLPN
    I had the same problem with a few of my clinical groups. Luckily, ours changed for each rotation. For my last group before graduation, I had the lazy one, the pushy one, the one who freaked out over everything, and the whiner. I had one good classmate in there. I really have no idea how they will survive in a real job. I feel bad for their future preceptor. Makes my sudder to think about it, actually. I agree with ktwlpn, though, you'll look way good. And, for the record, I did try to be non-judgemental, but they were truly just plain sub-standard.

    Gee, which one were you? I can only imagine. We wonder why nurses eat their young... we are cannibals.
  7. by   november17
    Wow. I'm sure you are a great person to be in clinicals with. Please don't ever become an instructor. Thanks.
  8. by   Bala Shark
    Yea, I remember our class president came to this site, and started attacking the whole class and its program..It was shame to see it but that is how she felt about our class..And the bad thing about it she was the president of our class..Well, in reality, the class was not that bad as she described it..

    Anyway, to the orginal poster, you should lose the attitude about your classmates..Maybe they dont want to be with you either..
  9. by   HeartsOpenWide
    I am sorry, but what a "loser" type of attitude. I may not want to be best friends with every one in my nursing program; however, I am in a BSN program and have to spend three years with these people. I do not want to be left out of any study groups or be put on some ones "you know what list" because I started talking smack, especially this early in the game.
    And yes, we do change clinicals every semester. I like it. Not to get away from people, but to have the chance to get to know all my classmates better. Nursing is a team effort. You have alot to learn, I would not want you on my team, or to be my nurrse for that matter. You might think I was a loser.
  10. by   WickedRedRN
    The more I look at this thread, the more I think we have been treated to a troll. The OP has not responded to this or any other thread. I am thinking the troll got the firestorm he/she wanted and moved on....

    Anyone else thinking the same thing?
  11. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Quote from LoriRN2B
    The more I look at this thread, the more I think we have been treated to a troll. The OP has not responded to this or any other thread. I am thinking the troll got the firestorm he/she wanted and moved on....

    Anyone else thinking the same thing?
    Or they are too embarrassed to respond
  12. by   UM Review RN
    You teach people how to treat you, Samy.

    I was much older than a lot of my classmates in clinical. They knew a lot about working in hospitals, but I knew a lot about life. Our instructor would pretty regularly get a few of them breaking down in tears with her criticism. She actually told a few of these hardworking students that they would not make it as nurses and they were becoming very demoralized by the end of the semester.

    I didn't like what was happening. I thought that it was wrong for anyone to tear down those students the way she had. I thought about all the work they'd put into studying to get as far as they had. I thought about the dream that we shared and our willingness to sacrifice family, fun, sleep, and money to do it.

    I got this in an email one day that semester and I decided to try what the class in the email did. I wrote one nice thing about each of my classmates.

    One girl told me she cried. One girl told me she hung it on her wall to remind her that someone cared. In other words, it touched all those that it needed to touch, and everyone passed that clinical. We should all learn the lesson to treat each other well, because we really do not know the future.

    Here is that email that gave me the idea:


    One day a teacher asked her students to list the names of the other students in the room on two sheets of paper, leaving a space between each name.
    Then she told them to think of the nicest thing they could say about each of their classmates and write it down.
    It took the remainder of the class period to finish their assignment and, as the students left the room, each one handed in the papers.
    That Saturday, the teacher wrote down the name of each student on a separate sheet of paper, and listed what everyone else had said about that individual.
    On Monday, she gave each student his or her list. Before long, the entire class was smiling. "Really?" she heard whispered. "I never knew that I meant anything to anyone!" and, "I didn't know others liked me so much." were some of the comments.
    No one ever mentioned those papers in class again. She never knew if they discussed them after class or with their parents, but it didn't matter. The exercise had accomplished its purpose.
    The students were happy with themselves and one another.
    That group of students moved on. Several years later, one of the students was killed in Vietnam and his teacher attended the funeral of that special student.
    She had never seen a serviceman in a military coffin before. He looked so handsome, so mature.
    The church was packed with his friends. One by one, those who loved him took a last walk by the coffin. The teacher was the last one to bless the coffin. As she stood there, one of the soldiers, who acted as pallbearer, came up to her.
    "Were you Mark's math teacher?" he asked.
    She nodded: "Yes."
    Then he said: "Mark talked about you a lot."
    After the funeral, most of Mark's former classmates went together to a luncheon. Mark's mother and father were there, obviously waiting to speak with his teacher.
    "We want to show you something," his father said, taking a wallet out of his pocket. "They found this on Mark when he was killed. We thought you might recognize it."
    Opening the billfold, he carefully removed two worn pieces of notepaper that had obviously been taped, folded and refolded many times.
    The teacher knew, without looking, that the papers were the ones on which she had listed all the good things each of Mark's classmates had said about him.
    "Thank you so much for doing that," Mark's mother said. "As you can see, Mark treasured it."
    All of Mark's former classmates started to gather around.
    Charlie smiled rather sheepishly and said, "I still have my list. It's in the top drawer of my desk at home."
    Chuck's wife said, "Chuck asked me to put his in our wedding album."
    "I have mine too," Marilyn said. "It's in my diary."
    Then Vickie, another classmate, reached into her pocketbook, took out her wallet and showed her worn and frazzled list to the group. "I carry this with me at all times," Vickie said, and without batting an eyelash, she continued: "I think we all saved our lists."
    That's when the teacher finally sat down and cried. She cried for Mark and for all his friends who would never see him again.
    The density of people in society is so thick that we forget that life will end one day. And we don't know when that one day will be.
    Remember, you reap what you sow, what you put into the lives of others, comes back into your own.
    MAY YOUR DAY BE AS SPECIAL AS YOU ARE.
  13. by   nurse4theplanet
    Our clinical groups changed each semester. However, the instructors took up lists of car pool groups and student preferences for sites/days, etc. So actually, our clinical groups ended up staying pretty similar throughout the semesters for that reason.

    I can get along with pretty much anyone and maintain a professional attitude, but I will admit that there were certain students that I preferred to be around and others that I did not. I would never call anyone a loser...that's pretty harsh.

    If you are concerned about it, ask your instructor about your school's policy on clinical groups. And if it is a problem, perhaps they can move you into another clinical group. I think it would behoove you to get to know your classmates a little better first, however, and focus on their strengths rather than their weaknesses. Who knows? You may end up learning something from them and needing their assistance in the future, in school and afterwards.

close