Can you become an RN at age 19?

  1. If it is possible,how?
    •  
  2. 28 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    Only in a perfect world where the stars align, ADN programs do not require prerequisite course work and there are no waiting lists.

    Highly unlikely.
  4. by   de05432
    Probably not. I went to college straight out of high school. I'm 22 right now and graduate in May.
  5. by   NICUismylife
    If you started taking your pre-reqs around the age of 15, and then found a program that would admit you at 17 (not likely), then you could potentially graduate by 19.

    And all that is assuming that you can get into each class when you need to and into a program right away with no waiting.

    So, is it theoretically possible? Maybe
    Is it likely? Not at all.
  6. by   TheCommuter
    One of our site moderators (Esme12) became an associate degree RN at age 18. However, she graduated nursing school in the late 1970s.

    An 18-year-old RN would be exceedingly rare in today's world.
  7. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from TheCommuter
    One of our site moderators (Esme12) became an associate degree RN at age 18. However, she graduated nursing school in the late 1970s.

    An 18-year-old RN would be exceedingly rare in today's world.
    Fun fact: ESME and I went to nursing school together! Boiler up!
  8. by   Simplistic
    Im going to be 20 when I graduate. So close enough.
  9. by   verene
    If you did your pre-reqs during high school (running start) and immediately entered nursing school at 18 it might be possible depending on when your birthday falls. If for instance you turn 18 immediately before the start of the program, one could potentially graduate a two year program shortly before turning 20.

    Graduating nursing school that young is exceedingly rare however, particularly as most programs will not allow students to start clinical coursework until at least 18 years old.
  10. by   Drizzle203
    Thanks for answering!
  11. by   HouTx
    I think that the only hard stops would be your state's regulations about handling some pharmaceuticals (narcotics). In many states, you have to be 21 - just like serving alcohol.
  12. by   caliotter3
    Had you started prereq classes or CLEP tests at 15 as previously mentioned, you could have done so with the Excelsior program (then Regents) when it first started. Since then they have changed their rules many times.
  13. by   Esme12
    Quote from TheCommuter
    One of our site moderators (Esme12) became an associate degree RN at age 18. However, she graduated nursing school in the late 1970s.

    An 18-year-old RN would be exceedingly rare in today's world.
    Fun fact: ESME and I went to nursing school together! Boiler up!
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    Fun fact: ESME and I went to nursing school together! Boiler up!
    Gotta love Boilermakers!

    Unfortunately in today's world it is highly unlikely to graduate any program under the age of 20 to 21 and that is still a stretch. Most schools today require a year of prerequisite courses before you start clinical rotations so even a "Two year ADN/ASN program" is really 3 years.

    The program that meanmaryjean went to was a unique opportunity when the programs were leaving the diploma based programs and transitioning to new "new" 2 year college based entry nursing degree. Our program was tough as our clinical experience was close to the same clinical hours as a diploma program AND....it was concurrent with all the other college and prereq. courses. We worked like dogs.

    Our nursing program is no longer in existence as it was as it is now the accelerated (with a difficult reputation) BSN program. Our program had one of the very few nursing faculty that was doctoral prepared. Dr. Ellis died of cancer years ago (RIP...you were a great lady) and she took a chance on a young, wide eyed, innocent, smart girl. Thank you Dr Ellis.

    I graduated high school VERY YOUNG!!! I was in the "gifted" program and technically never went to second grade and started kindergarten at age 4 (December birthday I turned 5). I was....18 when I graduated nursing....going to nursing school was, shall I say, "enlightening!"...LOL. It was a LONG time ago.
  14. by   andrea3434
    Interesting...I know high schoolers can take college courses for their junior and senior year around here (MN). Our babysitter started at 16 and will already have two years of college completed by the time she graduates high school, so she will be able to graduate with a 4-year degree by the time she's 20 if she stays on track.

close