Call me crazy... but..

  1. Okay, I know that there will be some of you who think I'm nuts, but here goes anyway..

    .. My friend and I both just found out that we were accepted to the nursing program here in town. It's a junior college, but still very competitive, and its supposed to be one of the best in the state. I was number 2 on the list, and she was number 6.

    Here's my concern: I spoke with my friend yesterday, and she mentioned that her husband read a cartoon about someone always being overprepared, and he thought of me. She laughed, and I know it was meant to be a compliment, but it made me think.

    When I was in the military, it was the same type of thing; I was always the one in my unit who was prepared, always the one who took the heavier workload, because the others couldn't handle it, and I would rather get it done right than to allow it to slide.

    Now, I've been planning and preparing for NS for months, buying little things here and there for school (to avoid that huge bill by buying everything at once right before Christmas), doing research, basically trying to make sure I have as many bases covered as possible before I start the program. If this experience is anything like what I dealt with during my military career, I am going to be one seriously tired person! I've always been the go-to girl, always the one with typed study guides, the one everyone seems to come to for answers. For the most part, I don't mind, but it seems like my own A+ personality type may land me with more work than others.

    So, just as a question for those ahead of me (and anyone else with a bit of advice), is this reflective of what I can expect in NS? And later when I'm working? I love being able to help people, and I take pride in my knowledge and competence in completing tasks, but I dont' want that part of me to provide an excuse for others not to learn or do their own work. When I was in the service, our motto was always "watch one, do one, teach one", and that was how we learned. I'm thinking that NS is probably going to be similar, I just don't want to take on the burden of ensuring that others can keep up.

    Thanks for listening, I'm probably crazy, and worried about nothing, but it feels good to be able to at least attempt to explain this worry to a group of people who have been there and done that.
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   nurz2be
    Let me first say this...I am the type who likes to help others. In the past I would be so persistent in making sure that those around me weren't falling behind that I would set myself short for my own tasks or studying. I am my own responsibility. I help when I am FINISHED or while I am doing my own studying. I don't cut into the time I have alloted for my own studies. You will see once you are actually in nursing school that, depending on the type of school you attend, your own study schedule can be rather demanding. We have a study group that meets once a week outside school, I send emails of information to my classmates that I find that I think might be of assistance, I post information here that I think is helpful for other students, BUT I WILL NOT cut my own time short. Once we are nurses we will be mostly on our own to make sure our tasks are completed for our shift, people don't have time to make sure we are doing our jobs. It is just expected and rightfully so. Not to say we won't get help at times. Your fellow classmates have to learn that as well. So, my advice is help when you have free time and when you feel "comfortable" with your own studies.

    GOOD LUCK IN NS>
  4. by   Conrad283
    First off, congrats on getting into nursing school. That's no easy task to begin with.

    It's excellent that you can visualize what you will need for school, that's actually pretty smart. Don't worry about what other people say/think. Being prepared is a great characteristic to have.

    Nursing school will take a bit out of you. It's very demanding, a lot of reading, and studying. You said you like to type your notes, just be careful as to not getting burnt out in the first semester because it only get's more difficult from there on.

    Remember to understand the material and not memorize it!
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Good advice from Conrad.

    I think you simply sound mature and prepared. It will help.

    Just don't do things like always take the extra hard assignments (although I'm not sure how that could happen in school). Focus on learning.

    I rewrote my notes so I understand . . . it is a way to re-study the material.

    steph
  6. by   Daytonite
    OMG! If ever anyone sounded like the mold for an RN, you are it. Don't change. Organization is half the job. And, don't feel intimidated by what anyone has to say about you. That's your self-esteem and uncertainty pecking away at you. Ignore it. With time and experience those thoughts and feelings will go away as your confidence level rises. One thing about being an RN that you need to understand, however, is that an RN is a problem solver. That is what you are going to be trained to do. That is what this nursing process is all about that you will hear some of the students complain about on the posts. They don't understand that it is the big concept you are being trained in and that is why it is being beaten into you semester after semester. After they are graduated and working maybe they'll finally "get it". During my entire career each day was filled with tackling problems as they came my way. While I had a routine that I pretty much had to follow, it was constantly interrupted by small fires that needed stamping out. That is what your value is as an RN--your ability to assess a situation, determine the problem, resolve it and go on about your way. In the military, RNs are officers. Can you see why? They have to make decisions.

    Wait until you run into nurses who aren't prepared and look like they're constantly running amok and are disorganized. You'll wonder how they ever get through their work shifts.

    I wouldn't particularly describe nursing school as "watch one, do one, teach one". More like "watch one, do one, do another one, do another one. . .". It takes a lot of practice to become proficient in any skills. That "teach one" attitude is an old school idea. What if the person teaching you doesn't know the procedure correctly? Then, you'll learn it wrong. It's hard to unlearn something you've learned the wrong way. It is a fact, however, that speaking to others about what you have learned helps you learn it and assimilate it into your brain even better. Educators have known this from research for years. This is one reason why students get assigned oral presentations and group projects. Much as they dislike doing them they really learn more from them than just sitting and listening to lectures.
  7. by   KEL2BanRN
    Quote from phoenixfire
    Okay, I know that there will be some of you who think I'm nuts, but here goes anyway..

    .. My friend and I both just found out that we were accepted to the nursing program here in town. It's a junior college, but still very competitive, and its supposed to be one of the best in the state. I was number 2 on the list, and she was number 6.

    Here's my concern: I spoke with my friend yesterday, and she mentioned that her husband read a cartoon about someone always being overprepared, and he thought of me. She laughed, and I know it was meant to be a compliment, but it made me think.

    When I was in the military, it was the same type of thing; I was always the one in my unit who was prepared, always the one who took the heavier workload, because the others couldn't handle it, and I would rather get it done right than to allow it to slide.

    Now, I've been planning and preparing for NS for months, buying little things here and there for school (to avoid that huge bill by buying everything at once right before Christmas), doing research, basically trying to make sure I have as many bases covered as possible before I start the program. If this experience is anything like what I dealt with during my military career, I am going to be one seriously tired person! I've always been the go-to girl, always the one with typed study guides, the one everyone seems to come to for answers. For the most part, I don't mind, but it seems like my own A+ personality type may land me with more work than others.

    So, just as a question for those ahead of me (and anyone else with a bit of advice), is this reflective of what I can expect in NS? And later when I'm working? I love being able to help people, and I take pride in my knowledge and competence in completing tasks, but I dont' want that part of me to provide an excuse for others not to learn or do their own work. When I was in the service, our motto was always "watch one, do one, teach one", and that was how we learned. I'm thinking that NS is probably going to be similar, I just don't want to take on the burden of ensuring that others can keep up.

    Thanks for listening, I'm probably crazy, and worried about nothing, but it feels good to be able to at least attempt to explain this worry to a group of people who have been there and done that.
    ::THUD:: You just described me to a T. My friend in NS is just like me, so we stick together, LOL. People joke that we're both "anal", and that we do so well (as if that's a bad thing). I can't help it, this is just my personality and I don't try to fight it anymore. I'm uber-organized and I like having all my ducks in a row when I dive into something. And I do "dive" into it! The one time I've seen others "take advantage" of my ways was during a collaborative effort test - people joked ahead of time that they were all going to crowd around my friend and I since they "knew we'd have all the answers". That was annoying. That was in anatomy. I didn't think we'd ever see another collaborative test, but I found out that our last nursing test of the quarter is collab, and people have already started saying those things to me. Having said that, I DO love to help others. I've already helped a couple students study who were not doing well on the critical thinking tests. But I only help if I have time to give. I'm a really giving person. I think you'll make a great RN!
  8. by   MB37
    I'm the same way - unlike my classmates, I didn't "give up" on getting As in NS, so I'm still getting them. I type up a study guide for each test, and I do e-mail a copy to everyone in my clinical group. Several of them do the same thing, so it's not like I'm giving without giving in return. Most people who get into NS have to be a little type A, and at least at my school you need great grades to get in. You'll do fantastic!
  9. by   bekindtokittens
    I am also someone who overprepares. Some of my classmates made fun of me for this, at least in the beginning of the semester. Now they come to me for help with study guides or notes. I still gladly help them, as long as it doesn't interfere with my best interests. My attitude is this -- you never know what the future holds; someday the person you helped may be able to help you. I'm book smart but with no actual experience; some of my classmates are CNAs and really help me during clinicals.
  10. by   Cinqly
    congratulations on getting into nursing school! you have a long, rewarding journey ahead! i apoligize in advance for my lengthy response...

    i am just finishing my first semester of school, and i know exactly how you feel. i am also an organized, prepared, put-together student who always has my work done, done well, and done according to instructions. (i had my uniform purchased 4 months early!) i guess if i can give you any advice, it would be to stay true to yourself. in nursing school you are going to meet both like-minded people as well as, for lack of a better word, "leeches". try to find people with the same goals and work ethics, and form a cooperative relationship with them. it's ok to study with and share work with fellow students when you are giving to each other. it becomes difficult when you have to deal with people that expect you to help them and do the work for them. i'm sorry, but it's just not going to be that way in real life. as an rn, we will be working as part of a healthcare team, but we will also be working alone when caring for our patients. if you sacrifice learning something in nursing school, it will only end up hurting you in the end.

    to echo the words of nurz2be, you need to make sure that you are where you need to be before you can really begin helping others. that's not to say you should be selfish, but it is important for you to know what you are doing, and how to do it! after you feel comfortable, then it's time for study groups, quiz sessions, exchanging notes, etc. try to find productive ways of assisting others, rather than just sending them copies of notes. if you can find 1 or 2 like-minded people, form a study group where you each complete a section of a unit, send it to each other, and then get together to study before the test. if that doesn't work for you, try a study group that meets only after everyone has studied on their own (this works for me). or, if none of that works, study yourself and delegate help to others where and when you feel comfortable. but do not sacrifice your efforts...you've worked to hard, and come too far!!!!

    if i may go so far as to give more unsolicited advice, i have another suggestion that might help to keep you sane in school. your test grades are your test grades!!!! don't fall into the trap of blurting out grades, successes, and failures after every test or assignment!! it is really quite unnecessary to know other people's grades, and it does nothing but demoralize you or inflate your ego. why put yourself through that??? we have a guy in my class that loves to let everyone know his grade (he usually does very well), and loves to hear that he did better than you. it absolutely irks him that i won't tell him my grades, other than to say "i passed" on tests. it's nearing the end of the semester, and he is busy stressing about how he needs to get a certain score, while i am busy stressing about learning everything i need to know for my tests and competency exams. to be honest, i've actually done better than him on several tests, and i think it is certainly in part due to my attitude that grades are important, but my need to know the information and perform the skills knowledgeably and competently is more important. it is this attitude that gets me good grades. anyway, obviously this is a sensitive subject for me, because it breaks my heart to see people worrying about the result, and not the process. i just see too many people stressing over a number or a letter grade, and not spending enough time thinking about how they can improve their skills. plus, if you don't tell people your grades, then they don't know whether or not to solicit you help. it gives you the opportunity to be more selective with who you choose to help. anyway, just my two cents.

    best of luck in school, and remember to be true to yourself! you are going to make an excellent, competent student and nurse!
    Last edit by Cinqly on Nov 11, '07 : Reason: spelling ;-)
  11. by   DesertRain
    Congratulations on getting in, great accomplishment and you should be very proud of yourself. First of all, don't justify your education from a J.C., like you said, sometimes it is the junior colleges that put out some very clinically experienced nurses and with you stating that it is very competitive shows that you just got accepted into a great school. Second of all, sounds like you will excel! It takes exactly that type of drive to succeed in nursing school. I am the same way (the organization and typed notes..heehee, sounds just like me) and I can't imagine how I would be making it through without the meticulous details that are just part of my personality to begin with. You are not crazy, being prepared is a key element to succeeding in NS. You will do great! Congratulations and welcome aboard!
  12. by   purple1953reading
    I would never apologize, for being ahead of the game, sure of myself, and prepared. I , too, am like that. I went through school at the top of my class, and was the one that everybody said "You don't have to get straight As to be a good nurse" about, because, in their own security, they wanted to say something to imply I was wrong, but in reality, I wasn't. THey posted our grades by SS and after the first 3 weeks, I changed mine, because somebody was so insecure, they would see my number at the top for each post, and always say:" Of course, that must be T", the first time I picked a number that turned out to be the same as somebody else, and I got 100 and she got 80, but she saw her number at the top of the list and thought she got a 100, so I had to look for a new number. Every one will make remarks about you, like SHE must spend all her time studying. SHE doesn't have a life. ETC< but they are jealous, and your skills or organization is what will allow you to go ahead and become a wonderful nurse, having already over come 75% of the battle of knowing what you want, and how to go about getting it. I, too, believe that nobody else needs to know anybody's lettter grade. And, even years ago, when I went to school, in our whole class of 200 people,they took 4 highschool grads, I think the median age was 24-30, and the oldest was 60!

    Best of luck, and enjoy learning.
  13. by   happynewLPN
    You're not crazy. You're prepared.

    You will do fine in nursing school. The biggest obstacle most people have to overcome is NOT being prepared. You already have that in the bag.

    Don't try to change your way of thinking, studying or preparation. Go into it the way you are, and you'll be fine.

    I can relate with much of what you're saying.

    Congrats and good luck!!

    Lisa
  14. by   *Blessed2BaNRS*
    phoenixfire.

    Congratulations on getting accepted into NS! Like others said, don't underestimate being in a junior college. I am in one here in Texas, and from what I have heard, the hospitals would rather hire graduates from my school than from the University here.

    As far as your other concern, be careful!! I say that because I am just like what you described. I love to help people, and it has come back to bite me in the butt this semester! I started NS in August and was elected as class representative. I started off telling everyone that I would be available if they needed me for anything. I have participated in the "extracurricular" activities that our program has, and have helped whenever and whatever I could. As a result, I am failing 1 class by 1 point, because I have spent so much time helping others that I neglected my own studies. I have gotten phone calls at 4:30 in the morning, had numerous text messages and phone calls in 1 evening, not to mention all the emails asking about this or that. I finally had to turn my phone off and not answer emails and focus on myself. Now there is some resentment there, because everyone was griping and complaining about what was going on with our group and I have decided that I don't have time to deal with it. I have never once been stressed about class, or the amount of work and reading we have, nor stressed the tests (much!!) but I have been TOTALLY stressed about all the crap going on in class. It has frustrated the instructors, the director and myself. People think that I get the "inside scoop" on everything because I talk to the instructors, but I do all my work on my own, and find out information just like everyone else should. I read the syllabus or ask. I have gotten very frustrated with school because of all the griping, so I have learned to stay away from it all, and do my own thing. I found out the hard way that you are in the program for yourself, not for everyone else!! Just keep that in mind, and you should do fine. I will still help out my classmates, but I don't let it interfere with my study time anymore.

    Just a few comments frfom someone who has been there, done that!!! Good luck in school~

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