C=degree - page 3

by ThePrincessBride | 7,417 Views | 55 Comments

How do you feel about the statement in the title?I am a second term nursing student. Not the super star straight A student, usually B student. I have never been surrounded by so many type A, super competitive people in my life... Read More


  1. 4
    We have two straight A students that are complete idiots at clinical. I've noticed that it's not uncommon to be tested on something before you experience it at clinical or can practice applying your knowledge for that subject. I think what you do is more important than your test grades.

    I just started a new rotation, one of the A students has no idea what is going on. So how was that A useful to anyone?

    I plan to get my MSN, in my area C does not = Grad school.
    i<3u, DizzyLizzyNurse, nguyency77, and 1 other like this.
  2. 1
    Quote from ckh23
    Bring them on. I was a "B" student. There is more to nursing than what you just learn in school.
    This was me. I did make an "A" in nursing math and some silly management course (both were 1 credit). But I would also like to point out that our grading scale was different than what I hear a lot. C=75 to 85.9, B=86-93.9, A=94+.

    I made straight B's in other nursing courses. I do remember my pediatrics grade was technically 85.3 which would have been a "C" but my instructor entered a B for me, I think because I wrote an awesome care plan and there was no number grade to those, just pass/fail. She was already one of my favorite instructors before I figured this out and I still think of her fondly. She was one of the few that still worked in the clinical setting, and I think that was key. I doubt she's still working, but Ms. Kerrigan deserves to be mentioned by name.
    KJDa81 likes this.
  3. 2
    Quote from studentnurseCT
    We have two straight A students that are complete idiots at clinical. I've noticed that it's not uncommon to be tested on something before you experience it at clinical or can practice applying your knowledge for that subject. I think what you do is more important than your test grades.

    I just started a new rotation, one of the A students has no idea what is going on. So how was that A useful to anyone?

    I plan to get my MSN, in my area C does not = Grad school.
    gotta love booknurses
    RN in training and ORnurseCT like this.
  4. 0
    Perhaps in the past when there was a real nursing shortage, employers didn't care about GPAs.

    Nowadays, they do care. They have a glut of nurses to choose from and can afford to be as picky as they like, and will often ask for GPAs and/or transcripts in order to cull the herd or decide between two candidates. And many new graduate nurse residency programs have minimum GPA requirements. After all, you're a new nurse with no experience--unless you're a LVN-RN fleet-up who can put actual nursing experience on the resume, they have no way to judge your nursing competence right off the bat. So grades do factor for new grads.

    Fortunately, once you have some experience under your belt, the GPA seems to be less important to the employer.

    That being said, are grades the be-all end-all of nursing success? No, because grades are just one factor in what makes a good nurse. I know some former A students who are great nurses, and some who I wouldn't let treat my cat. Same with B and C students: I've worked with very talented ones and very scary ones.
  5. 1
    Quote from Meriwhen
    ...some who I wouldn't let treat my cat...
    Guess it all depends on how you feel about your cat, then...

    Quote from Meriwhen
    ...I've worked with very talented ones and very scary ones...
    True dat - and it's not just in healthcare either. Far as the GPA/NCLEX/whatever being important...it bears repeating that at the current time, in the current job market, it's important to give yourself every possible advantage, including good grades & 1st time passes on licensure exams, and not just for new grads - they're filtering us old fogeys by the same criteria! Give it a few years and it'll likely simmer down (after you've been through several recessions, you start to see the patterns emerge - we've been on the way out of this one for roughly 9-10 months here in SoCal) but it still doesn't hurt to put in 110% to get the good marks. That said - don't lose sight of the fact that, when all is said & done what you do in the real world is what ultimately matters, and it's still all about the patient.

    ----- Dave.
    i<3u likes this.
  6. 0
    When I was in nursing school, 1987, at my college an 83 was failing. They only accepted 84 or above. You had to make 94 to make an A. So if you made a good solid B of 86, it was a C there. Then I went on to another school for the BSN, and was shocked to find that you could pass the BSN program there with a 70! It was a piece of cake compared to my ADN program.
  7. 0
    With 35 out of 36 students having a class average that is NOT passing (80 is passing). I would gladly take a C. Our first year, we had a 6 point scale so an 86.4 is a C. We now have a modified scale (80-85 C, 86-91 B 92-100 A). They kept telling us to plan on going on, you basically have to have a BSN eventually here. We argued that we would never get in anywhere with a 2.0 GPA, which you would have if you got all 86s. That is ridiculous. They have written letters for people going on interviews because they do ask for GPA as new grads.
    I am not sure there is a single person in our class that has a GPA higher than ~maybe 3.25. There have only been a handful of As over the past 2 years.
  8. 0
    Where I am, it's 80 = passing. However, they plan to change that with the next entering class and it will become 83. Thank god I'm grandfathered in! 80 I get but 83 is a bit too much, I believe. Personally, I had A's in the AP's and Stats but for nursing I can't seem to get an A or A-. I love clinical, and I study well (luckily I memorize easily). While that works for AP, it won't cut it for those critical thinking questions. Obviously you have to know your stuff, and through studying you should, but to answer those you need to think some of these through and not let anxiety get to you. I think that's my problem. I still (every now and then) do the dreaded "answer changing" after I've taken it... I let myself convince myself of things I leave the test knowing full well were wrong. That's what frustrates me. I've gotten better but I still make stupid mistakes.

    So my take on this is that you have to be well rounded in anything, right? If you're studying as hard as you can, and you've tried to make yourself as prepared for those tests as possible and you're still getting C's and falling victim to the tricky questions then make sure you're overcompensating in clinical. I'm sure, depending on where you interview, it's easier for some HR people to narrow down applicants based on GPA. So that's where getting to know RN's and staff in clinical might help you get the job, give THEM the resume. They've seen you and know what you can do (not how strong your test taking strategy is). Would we have any Apple products if someone made Steve Jobs pass a test on "best practices".. I doubt there would be any option for "put one single button that carries out every function in the middle of the screen"
  9. 2
    I hope that employers do not look at GPAs as a sole factor in the future. There is too much wrong with that. In our program, 83 and above is a 'C.' At other programs around the area, 80 and above is a 'C.' So, while you might consistently end up with an 81 or 82 in this program, you are considered a 'C' student. If you went somewhere else, you could have been labeled a 'B' student.


    I wouldn't care what the final grade of a nurse was- as long as she was caring and competent. There are some people who get 'C's and are simply wonderful on the floor. Many of the 'C' students in my class are also very smart. I can only think of one person who I wouldn't want to be a nurse in my class. This is based on her work ethic and integrity - not grade.

    There are some 'A' students who I wouldn't want to be my nurse simply because they are mean people. I'd rather have the caring, attentive, smart, and skillful 'C' student over the nurse I could not trust. And as someone mentioned, 'A' students could be pretty clueless on the floor. Maybe they are the type that studies very hard for a test, but then forgets most of the principles shortly after.

    The problem with school today is that 'B' and 'C' are looked at as bad grades now, when this should not be the case. It's pretty unfair. I don't doubt that any of the 'B' and 'C' students in my program don't study hard. They could probably tell you everything they know about the covered subjects, but may not be the best test taker.

    Some students don't have a family of their own or a job. They may be 'A' students, but their circumstances are different. It doesn't mean that they are any smarter. Perhaps they just have more time on their hands.
    RipeChanceWoods and mznelly like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from IEDave
    Guess it all depends on how you feel about your cat, then...
    Well, I love the cranky old girl

    I agree with you: new grads today should give themselves every advantage they possibly can, because there's just too many of you and too few spots to fill.

    Does having a stellar GPA guarantee you'll get a job? Not by a long shot. Can it help get you noticed to get the interview? Yes...and with the job market for new grads nowadays, landing an interview is half the battle.


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