C=degree C=degree - pg.3 | allnurses

C=degree - page 3

How do you feel about the statement in the title?I am a second term nursing student. Not the super star straight A student, usually B student. I have never been surrounded by so many type A, super... Read More

  1. Visit  mmc51264 profile page
    0
    With 35 out of 36 students having a class average that is NOT passing (80 is passing). I would gladly take a C. Our first year, we had a 6 point scale so an 86.4 is a C. We now have a modified scale (80-85 C, 86-91 B 92-100 A). They kept telling us to plan on going on, you basically have to have a BSN eventually here. We argued that we would never get in anywhere with a 2.0 GPA, which you would have if you got all 86s. That is ridiculous. They have written letters for people going on interviews because they do ask for GPA as new grads.
    I am not sure there is a single person in our class that has a GPA higher than ~maybe 3.25. There have only been a handful of As over the past 2 years.
  2. Visit  number41 profile page
    0
    Where I am, it's 80 = passing. However, they plan to change that with the next entering class and it will become 83. Thank god I'm grandfathered in! 80 I get but 83 is a bit too much, I believe. Personally, I had A's in the AP's and Stats but for nursing I can't seem to get an A or A-. I love clinical, and I study well (luckily I memorize easily). While that works for AP, it won't cut it for those critical thinking questions. Obviously you have to know your stuff, and through studying you should, but to answer those you need to think some of these through and not let anxiety get to you. I think that's my problem. I still (every now and then) do the dreaded "answer changing" after I've taken it... I let myself convince myself of things I leave the test knowing full well were wrong. That's what frustrates me. I've gotten better but I still make stupid mistakes.

    So my take on this is that you have to be well rounded in anything, right? If you're studying as hard as you can, and you've tried to make yourself as prepared for those tests as possible and you're still getting C's and falling victim to the tricky questions then make sure you're overcompensating in clinical. I'm sure, depending on where you interview, it's easier for some HR people to narrow down applicants based on GPA. So that's where getting to know RN's and staff in clinical might help you get the job, give THEM the resume. They've seen you and know what you can do (not how strong your test taking strategy is). Would we have any Apple products if someone made Steve Jobs pass a test on "best practices".. I doubt there would be any option for "put one single button that carries out every function in the middle of the screen"
  3. Visit  Scarlettz profile page
    2
    I hope that employers do not look at GPAs as a sole factor in the future. There is too much wrong with that. In our program, 83 and above is a 'C.' At other programs around the area, 80 and above is a 'C.' So, while you might consistently end up with an 81 or 82 in this program, you are considered a 'C' student. If you went somewhere else, you could have been labeled a 'B' student.


    I wouldn't care what the final grade of a nurse was- as long as she was caring and competent. There are some people who get 'C's and are simply wonderful on the floor. Many of the 'C' students in my class are also very smart. I can only think of one person who I wouldn't want to be a nurse in my class. This is based on her work ethic and integrity - not grade.

    There are some 'A' students who I wouldn't want to be my nurse simply because they are mean people. I'd rather have the caring, attentive, smart, and skillful 'C' student over the nurse I could not trust. And as someone mentioned, 'A' students could be pretty clueless on the floor. Maybe they are the type that studies very hard for a test, but then forgets most of the principles shortly after.

    The problem with school today is that 'B' and 'C' are looked at as bad grades now, when this should not be the case. It's pretty unfair. I don't doubt that any of the 'B' and 'C' students in my program don't study hard. They could probably tell you everything they know about the covered subjects, but may not be the best test taker.

    Some students don't have a family of their own or a job. They may be 'A' students, but their circumstances are different. It doesn't mean that they are any smarter. Perhaps they just have more time on their hands.
    number41 and mznelly like this.
  4. Visit  Meriwhen profile page
    0
    Quote from IEDave
    Guess it all depends on how you feel about your cat, then...
    Well, I love the cranky old girl

    I agree with you: new grads today should give themselves every advantage they possibly can, because there's just too many of you and too few spots to fill.

    Does having a stellar GPA guarantee you'll get a job? Not by a long shot. Can it help get you noticed to get the interview? Yes...and with the job market for new grads nowadays, landing an interview is half the battle.
  5. Visit  grubb250 profile page
    0
    In my program 80% is a C. I work hard and get B's and C's, I study hard. I could study more and maybe I'd get A's. But I have a family and two young kids and I dont want to miss them growing up. I feel that spending a little more time with my family helps me relax and in turn helps me do better and tests.
  6. Visit  BlackMurse1 profile page
    1
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    How do you feel about the statement in the title?I am a second term nursing student. Not the super star straight A student, usually B student. I have never been surrounded by so many type A, super competitive people in my life and tbh, it can be very off putting to be in that type of environment all the time.I have come to accept the fact that I will never be the A student and have become comfortable with less. What is your take on straight C or B students entering nursing? What is your take on students who try hard but don't make A's?Have employers made a big deal out of your gpa?
    To be honest, only really elite hospitals like New York Presb, John Hopkins, Mass General, Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic, etc.. ask for GPA on their online application and chances are they wont hire you as a new grad anyways.
    If I were you, i would focus on sharpening my clinical skills versus worrying about grades. With so many online programs a B average is more then enough to continue ones education.
    Besides, you are there to be able to earn the opportunity to take your boards, not to make the honor role. As long as you understand what the nurse has to do....you will be set.
    i<3u likes this.
  7. Visit  snickers21 profile page
    2
    I have heard c=degree and c=continue quite a bit. I get that grades aren't everything, but I don't understand the people who only study enough to get that C. I'm shocked at the amount of people whose GOAL is to get a C. I must be a type A personality without knowing it, because I've always thought that you should try your best and try to learn it all or as much as possible and if you get a B or C, that is ok, because you put the effort in and you learned. However to study, just enough to pass and little more? I will never get it. *shrug*
    ladylysis and Al.ginger like this.
  8. Visit  llg profile page
    6
    There is a BIG difference between someone who tries to do their best but struggles a bit and earns a C -- learns from it and improves as a result of the experience ...... and someone whose goal is to perform at the bare minimum level required to pass.

    The person who is NOT satisfied with the C and uses the experience to grow and learn more is one I would want to work with. The person who IS satisfied with a C and does not aspire to do better is one that I don't want to work with and will not hire.

    The question is not whether or not you ever got a bad or mediocre grade. The questions are: How did you get it? How did you feel about? How did you react to it?
    ladylysis, mugglex, RN in training, and 3 others like this.
  9. Visit  nguyency77 profile page
    1
    Quote from studentnurseCT
    We have two straight A students that are complete idiots at clinical. I've noticed that it's not uncommon to be tested on something before you experience it at clinical or can practice applying your knowledge for that subject. I think what you do is more important than your test grades.

    I just started a new rotation, one of the A students has no idea what is going on. So how was that A useful to anyone?

    I plan to get my MSN, in my area C does not = Grad school.
    Cheaters bug me. It's a major problem at my university's nursing school, with a lot of the undergrads taking tests out of the room and giving the answers to friends.
    KimberlyRN89 likes this.
  10. Visit  ThePrincessBride profile page
    0
    Quote from llg
    There is a BIG difference between someone who tries to do their best but struggles a bit and earns a C -- learns from it and improves as a result of the experience ...... and someone whose goal is to perform at the bare minimum level required to pass.The person who is NOT satisfied with the C and uses the experience to grow and learn more is one I would want to work with. The person who IS satisfied with a C and does not aspire to do better is one that I don't want to work with and will not hire.The question is not whether or not you ever got a bad or mediocre grade. The questions are: How did you get it? How did you feel about? How did you react to it?
    I agree with this. However, with so many people getting A's and almost always being a B student, my motivation has been shot and I can see why someone would give up and settle with a C.At my program, there are so many people who look down at the B and C students and people treat B's like they are the plaque.
  11. Visit  ThePrincessBride profile page
    0
    Quote from snickers21
    I have heard c=degree and c=continue quite a bit. I get that grades aren't everything, but I don't understand the people who only study enough to get that C. I'm shocked at the amount of people whose GOAL is to get a C. I must be a type A personality without knowing it, because I've always thought that you should try your best and try to learn it all or as much as possible and if you get a B or C, that is ok, because you put the effort in and you learned. However to study, just enough to pass and little more? I will never get it. *shrug*
    I can't say I blame them. They seem to be happier and less stressed out than the A students and I am tempted to say, "screw it" and settle with a less than perfect grade.
  12. Visit  HouTx profile page
    0
    Hospitals in my area are using new grads' GPA as part of consideration for internship & residency programs.
  13. Visit  mmc51264 profile page
    0
    Here, too. As an ADN student, it is harder to get a job b/c I do think they are tougher on us (not saying BSN program is easier-just more spread out and maybe not as intense), we have to maintain a higher grade to stay in the program and the hospitals want the BSN students. I plan on getting mine, I just needed to get to work (a job) faster (missed the deadline for an ABSN program by a day). There are job opportunities here for ADN students, but we have some great hospitals that I think will not consider an ADN w/o a 4.0.

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