C=degree - page 2

How do you feel about the statement in the title?I am a second term nursing student. Not the super star straight A student, usually B student. I have never been surrounded by so many type A, super... Read More

  1. Visit  GitanoRN} profile page
    1
    Quote from theprincessbride
    how do you feel about the statement in the title?i am a second term nursing student. not the super star straight a student, usually b student. i have never been surrounded by so many type a, super competitive people in my life and tbh, it can be very off putting to be in that type of environment all the time.i have come to accept the fact that i will never be the a student and have become comfortable with less. what is your take on straight c or b students entering nursing? what is your take on students who try hard but don't make a's?have employers made a big deal out of your gpa?
    if it's any consolation once you graduate no one will ask you for your gpa, furthermore, a nurse is still a nurse even if they pass with a c or a , the same goes for doctors
    KimberlyRN89 likes this.
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  3. Visit  somedaypeds} profile page
    0
    In my program - C does not equal nurse. Anything less than 80% is not passing.
  4. Visit  nguyency77} profile page
    2
    I don't care if you have a few C's. The only thing I do care about is that nurses pass Pharmacology with an A or B, however. I will not let someone who cannot perform basic math give meds to my loved ones, heaven forbid.

    I know what you mean about those "Type A" people. I have a great GPA, but I don't let myself get competitive with people. It's a toxic environment that's created, and it benefits no one.
    i<3u and gonzo1 like this.
  5. Visit  ckh23} profile page
    0
    Bring them on. I was a "B" student. There is more to nursing than what you just learn in school.
  6. Visit  PeepnBiscuitsRN} profile page
    0
    I once had an instructor that would never give A's, because she said "if you get A's that means you know everything and you have it all down. You DO NOT have it all down, you DO NOT know everything."
  7. Visit  SunshineDaisy} profile page
    0
    I was an A student, till nursing school! Now I'm a B student, but I work my butt off for those B's!
  8. Visit  OB-nurse2013} profile page
    0
    Hahahha Sorry but I am mostly an A student pharm so far was my worse grade.. Still doesn't say much, we had drug calc in fund. and I got 100% on every single one. I feel completely competent when passing med's, and this is because as with everything in nursing it is constantly repeated in every class. Maybe I struggled with cardiac drugs during pharm but then when I researched in 1st clinical, 2nd clinical, med/surg 1, and med/surg 2 and so on and on you KNOW them. I feel okay to be cared for by any nurse that progresses through an accreditted nursing program and graduates, passes the NCLEX, and gets hired and then makes it through hospital/floor training.
  9. Visit  ORnurseCT} profile page
    4
    We have two straight A students that are complete idiots at clinical. I've noticed that it's not uncommon to be tested on something before you experience it at clinical or can practice applying your knowledge for that subject. I think what you do is more important than your test grades.

    I just started a new rotation, one of the A students has no idea what is going on. So how was that A useful to anyone?

    I plan to get my MSN, in my area C does not = Grad school.
    i<3u, DizzyLizzyNurse, nguyency77, and 1 other like this.
  10. Visit  TiffyRN} profile page
    1
    Quote from ckh23
    Bring them on. I was a "B" student. There is more to nursing than what you just learn in school.
    This was me. I did make an "A" in nursing math and some silly management course (both were 1 credit). But I would also like to point out that our grading scale was different than what I hear a lot. C=75 to 85.9, B=86-93.9, A=94+.

    I made straight B's in other nursing courses. I do remember my pediatrics grade was technically 85.3 which would have been a "C" but my instructor entered a B for me, I think because I wrote an awesome care plan and there was no number grade to those, just pass/fail. She was already one of my favorite instructors before I figured this out and I still think of her fondly. She was one of the few that still worked in the clinical setting, and I think that was key. I doubt she's still working, but Ms. Kerrigan deserves to be mentioned by name.
    KJDa81 likes this.
  11. Visit  Pneumothorax} profile page
    2
    Quote from studentnurseCT
    We have two straight A students that are complete idiots at clinical. I've noticed that it's not uncommon to be tested on something before you experience it at clinical or can practice applying your knowledge for that subject. I think what you do is more important than your test grades.

    I just started a new rotation, one of the A students has no idea what is going on. So how was that A useful to anyone?

    I plan to get my MSN, in my area C does not = Grad school.
    gotta love booknurses
    RN in training and ORnurseCT like this.
  12. Visit  Meriwhen} profile page
    0
    Perhaps in the past when there was a real nursing shortage, employers didn't care about GPAs.

    Nowadays, they do care. They have a glut of nurses to choose from and can afford to be as picky as they like, and will often ask for GPAs and/or transcripts in order to cull the herd or decide between two candidates. And many new graduate nurse residency programs have minimum GPA requirements. After all, you're a new nurse with no experience--unless you're a LVN-RN fleet-up who can put actual nursing experience on the resume, they have no way to judge your nursing competence right off the bat. So grades do factor for new grads.

    Fortunately, once you have some experience under your belt, the GPA seems to be less important to the employer.

    That being said, are grades the be-all end-all of nursing success? No, because grades are just one factor in what makes a good nurse. I know some former A students who are great nurses, and some who I wouldn't let treat my cat. Same with B and C students: I've worked with very talented ones and very scary ones.
  13. Visit  IEDave} profile page
    1
    Quote from Meriwhen
    ...some who I wouldn't let treat my cat...
    Guess it all depends on how you feel about your cat, then...

    Quote from Meriwhen
    ...I've worked with very talented ones and very scary ones...
    True dat - and it's not just in healthcare either. Far as the GPA/NCLEX/whatever being important...it bears repeating that at the current time, in the current job market, it's important to give yourself every possible advantage, including good grades & 1st time passes on licensure exams, and not just for new grads - they're filtering us old fogeys by the same criteria! Give it a few years and it'll likely simmer down (after you've been through several recessions, you start to see the patterns emerge - we've been on the way out of this one for roughly 9-10 months here in SoCal) but it still doesn't hurt to put in 110% to get the good marks. That said - don't lose sight of the fact that, when all is said & done what you do in the real world is what ultimately matters, and it's still all about the patient.

    ----- Dave.
    i<3u likes this.
  14. Visit  applewhitern} profile page
    0
    When I was in nursing school, 1987, at my college an 83 was failing. They only accepted 84 or above. You had to make 94 to make an A. So if you made a good solid B of 86, it was a C there. Then I went on to another school for the BSN, and was shocked to find that you could pass the BSN program there with a 70! It was a piece of cake compared to my ADN program.

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