BLS certification

  1. what is the BLS cert? thanks
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   MesaRN
    BLS stands for Basic Life Support. It is designed as CPR and airway management for the professional care giver. It is a little more advanced and takes a few hours more to complete than basic CPR. You can get the cert. via most hospitals. Typical the card issuing agency will be either the Red Cross or the American Heart Association.

    You will need the BLS cert as a student before you can start clinicals. Many programs require that is be completed prior to even applying. It does take the better part of a day to complete, but it fairly painless and well worth knowing, and knowing well in this line of work!
  4. by   ChargeNurseAmy74
    Quote from MesaRN
    BLS stands for Basic Life Support. It is designed as CPR and airway management for the professional care giver. It is a little more advanced and takes a few hours more to complete than basic CPR. You can get the cert. via most hospitals. Typical the card issuing agency will be either the Red Cross or the American Heart Association.

    You will need the BLS cert as a student before you can start clinicals. Many programs require that is be completed prior to even applying. It does take the better part of a day to complete, but it fairly painless and well worth knowing, and knowing well in this line of work!

    thanks MESARN, do you also recommend me getting IV Certified? i see alot of job offers asking for that also.. thanks
  5. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from nurse2b_amy
    thanks MESARN, do you also recommend me getting IV Certified? i see alot of job offers asking for that also.. thanks

    It's my understanding IV cert happens at your workplace after you graduate, not before.

    ALSO - word of advice - check to see if your chosen school accepts only American Heart Association or American Red Cross certification, or either one. Apparently they are NOT created equal; my school only takes AHA and ARC people had to pay to get certified again because they didn't read the requirement carefully.
  6. by   Scrubz
    So does anyone think it would be worth while to go ahead and get BLS certified even if you're already CPR certified? Is it worth it?
  7. by   Daytonite
    Hi, nurse2b_amy. . .There are two types of CPR courses and certifications. (1) Heartsaver and (2) BLS (Basic Life Support). Both are designed and offered by the American Heart Association. The Red Cross also cooperates along with the American Heart Association to offer this training. If you need CPR as a requirement for nursing school you need to be very clear as to what the required certification is. Usually, you are required to get Basic Life Support certification if you are a nursing student or a licensed nurse.

    Heartsaver is the name designation for the group of courses that are given to the lay public, or non-healthcare professionals. In Heartsaver courses the lay public are trained to recognize and treat life threatening emergencies with adult, child and infant victims. This includes CPR and relief of a foreign body airway obstruction in all ages. While the Red Cross also teaches a combined CPR and First aid course, the guidelines for the CPR portion of the course are based on the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. The first aid section of these coursed are based on the American Red Cross/American Heart Association Guidelines for First Aid.

    Basic Life Support is specifically for healthcare providers. Upon successful completion of a Basic Life Support CPR course, you receive a credential (card) that documents this. You will be asked to produce this card to prove your CPR certification by employers and nursing schools. Basic Life Support covers adult, child and infant one and two rescuer CPR, use of an AED (automated external defibrillator) and relief of a foreign body airway obstruction in the responsive and unresponsive adult, child and infant. BLS courses often also include the use of a bag-mask and other barrier devices. This is quite different from the Heartsaver courses that are taught to the lay public. Nearly all acute hospitals and nursing homes require their personnel who are licensed to have BLS certification and often have their own American Heart Association trained and certified instructors teaching and certifying their employees. As nursing students you usually need to find your own sources to get your BLS certification. You should call your local or state American Heart Association office to get information on courses or instructors who teach and are able to certify you.

    This is the home page of the American Heart Association (American Heart Association ). At the left is a link to information about "CPR & ECC" (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care) that you can explore.

    IV certification is a national credential that is offered through the Intravenous Nurses Society (INS). You must be an RN, have worked at least 2000 hours with IVs and pass a national certification examination that is given by INS in order to become officially IV certified and place the initials CRNI (Certified RN, Intravenous) after your name. I have been CRNI certified and I can tell you that this national certification test is not easy. I was also an IV therapist for a total of 6 years during my career. You merely need to have a license as an RN to be able to perform IV therapy in all U.S. states. Some U.S. states have passed laws that allow LPNs to become IV certified in their state ONLY and perform some degree of IV therapy. To do this, however, the LPNs often have to take a special course in IV therapy that has been approved by their state board of nursing. Not all U.S. states allow LPNs to do this.
  8. by   TaoGirl
    Does anyone know: is the AHA class online? And if so what the cost is?
  9. by   PacoUSA
    Quote from TaoGirl
    Does anyone know: is the AHA class online? And if so what the cost is?
    YES, it is! I took the online course at the following website. They have the same course in two different formats:

    (1) HeartCode™ BLS part 1 costs a little bit more ($28.50) but if you like interactive modules along with your learning, this one is cool. You get to play these mini games that help you remember facts and also you can actually click your way towards reviving a cartoon man in a resuscitation scenario (you can even place AED pads on him with your mouse at the right time). I did this one, it was fun.

    (2) BLS for Healthcare Providers Online part 1 ($17.50) is I understand self-paced modules and videos, best for those who would learn best in this format or who prefer to save the $11 over the HeartCode™.

    No matter which one you take, you will still have to have your skills checked off in person through an AHA-approved instructor or site (actually doing the skills on a mannequin). The website provides you listings of these. They also charge for this check-off (I paid $25).

    TODAY in fact I completed my skills check for BLS and I'm glad I did it

    Oh yeah, here's the website: http://www.onlineaha.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=info.bls

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