attn ALL RN's !! serious help

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    Hi everyone my name is Andrea 23 y.o and im so glad that I came across this site. Heres my dilemma I was a nursing student but failed out of my program due to my struggle with critical thinking on tests. I worked so hard day and night with nursing as my # 1 priority. tried everything under the sun from practice questions, to study groups, to all nighters you name it all i always fell short. Clinical wise it was okay, it took me a while to grasp things but i realized i had a issue with my nerves it made me anxious for example once my instructor told me to check with the head nurse before i gave a med.. & it slipped me and i gave it without checking in first although the dosage was correct.. The issue is now i cant get back into nursing because my GPA is like a 2.4 & because i repeated courses. Nursing is my dream the nature of the job makes me happy everyone tells me i would be great when im on the unit i feel at home and it hurts me to think i possibly cant be cut out for this. Everything tells me dont give up but when there is no opportunity what do u do ? Should i change my major ? Im feeling like that now .. Am i not smart enough? have you seen anything like this --- Id appreciate the feedback im so lost :'(
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    Could you transfer your credits somewhere else, maybe to a community college and repeat some classes to bring up your GPA? Maybe you could reapply to nursing school once your grades are up again. Nursing is stressful, it's important when you're learning new things not to let anyone rush you and to allow it to sink into your thought processes.
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    You will get many encouraging "follow your dream" posts. Alas, although we do our best to be positive and encouraging, your post and your story give me strong hints that perhaps being an RN isn't in the cards for you at this time. You struggled with critical thinking in the first year, even before it gets a lot more complex in second year; your grades were poor; you couldn't remember a very basic and simple instruction about giving a medication; your writing and grammar indicate you probably struggle with any kind of written assignment.

    One option is to reapply to a general education program, perhaps at a community college or four-year university that gives you a choice of majors after the first two years. Focus hard on your English and communication skills; get tutoring for it. Take an intro to logic course; it'll probably be a challenge but will open your eyes. Retake your math and science courses and if you aren't doing at least a B in them all, get tutoring for them until you do -- you
    ll need at least a B to get into a nursing program anyway.

    If this is all too much to think about, too daunting a challenge, then yes, you may want to rethink your career goals. It is hard to hear but every nursing instructor every year sees students who just do not have what it takes to do the work in nursing school or be nurses. This doesn't make you a bad person or a stupid one; there are people who can't be English majors even though they love the idea of being a playwright, or music majors who can't play an instrument well enough to stay in the orchestra, or phys ed majors who cannot become fit enough to lead an exercise class. As it says in the ads, "If caring were enough, anyone could be a nurse." Well, everyone can't be a nurse. Your college will have a career counseling office; go work with them to see what else might be good for someone with your interests and skills.

    Try the remedial path outlined above and see if you can make it. That will give you your final answer. Good luck on whatever you decide.
    Jill2Shay, Horseshoe, chwcbesteph, and 11 others like this.
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    I'm not a nurse and don't start nursing school till this fall, but I think if it is truly something you want, then maybe you can start out as a CNA and try that for awhile and then try nursing school again? If you can't go back to NS, maybe something else in the medical field will appeal to you, like a medical technologist or a medical assistant, respiratory therapist or radiology technician? I would suggest looking into all of your options and make a plan. Also work on your test anxiety and practice to improve your listening skills. As for the PP, I don't think you can make assumptions of someone's writing abilities based on a post on an Internet forum. There's a big difference between a post on AN forum and a research paper for school.
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    Quote from dreamerxo
    Hi everyone my name is Andrea 23 y.o and im so glad that I came across this site. Heres my dilemma I was a nursing student but failed out of my program due to my struggle with critical thinking on tests. I worked so hard day and night with nursing as my # 1 priority. tried everything under the sun from practice questions, to study groups, to all nighters you name it all i always fell short. Clinical wise it was okay, it took me a while to grasp things but i realized i had a issue with my nerves it made me anxious for example once my instructor told me to check with the head nurse before i gave a med.. & it slipped me and i gave it without checking in first although the dosage was correct.. The issue is now i cant get back into nursing because my GPA is like a 2.4 & because i repeated courses. Nursing is my dream the nature of the job makes me happy everyone tells me i would be great when im on the unit i feel at home and it hurts me to think i possibly cant be cut out for this. Everything tells me dont give up but when there is no opportunity what do u do ? Should i change my major ? Im feeling like that now .. Am i not smart enough? have you seen anything like this --- Id appreciate the feedback im so lost :'(
    I'm going to say that you certainly should follow your dreams... but I also highlighted some things that stood out to me. It's those things that tell me that you shouldn't immediately jump back into nursing right now. I think you should at least get tested for a possible learning problem. Please don't take that as me saying you can't learn things or you're dumb. Quite the opposite. It's likely you're quite intelligent but you haven't figured out how your brain works and why it's doing stuff to you. Once you know what's going on, people should be able to help you figure out how you learn best and how to compensate for your issue, whatever it may be. Once that's been sorted out, then you'll be able to come back into nursing and I think you'll have an easier time of it. I also think GrnTea has some good suggestions too. Some coursework as outlined might do you good and set you on a better path, whether nursing is in it or not.
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    What is it that you love about nursing, and what is it that intimidates you? Perhaps right now is not your time to be a nurse. There are plenty of other opportunities available to you that would allow you to work in a health care setting. You could be a CNA, get your phlebotomy certificate, or check out other options that may interest you.

    Only you can answer your own question, and it will require some honesty on your behalf. If you think you can repeat courses, do better, and continue on because this is your passion, then by all means...do that. If you think that critical thinking can't be taught, then perhaps this isn't for you. It really depends on your level of accountability and perseverance.
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    Sorry to hear about your situation, really unfortunate. I have to agree with akulahawk however that you may want to get tested for a possible learning disability, maybe even an anxiety disorder or ADHD related issue. If you do have a legitimate disability and can get treatment showing improvement in your critical thinking abilities and anxiety coping skills, etc., you may have a chance at being admitted into a program with success. Don't let this experience define you or set the tone for all that you do, try to find a way to overcome your struggles and achieve your passion. When God closes a door, He opens a window...maybe talk to a counselor at your school to see what steps you can take to get tested?
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    I'm with the others, follow your dreams, but do it methodically.

    I believe intelligence is more fluid than we give ourselves credit for, but improving involves really carefully planned (deliberate) practice. You posted about your cumulative GPA and mentioned "critical thinking", but can you identify a particular area that you had trouble with? That could be a concrete starting point. Outside performance feedback is key, as well.

    Lets say you had particular issues with understanding the nursing implications of heart failure. You could write up a post on your understanding of heart failure and ask for feedback to see what you might be missing. Just a thought.
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    Quote from adc85
    I don't think you can make assumptions of someone's writing abilities based on a post on an Internet forum.
    Maybe not on other forums, but on this one, yes. Your post will be judged based on how you write because this is a site of professionals. That's why the TOS says no text speak, avoid all caps, etc.

    OP, follow what GrnTea suggested. I'm sure it sounds challenging and scary, but she was very thoughtful in her suggestions in how you could improve and realize your dream of becoming a nurse. I have a friend who failed the TEAS. She didn't know how to multiply. I'm serious! She swallowed her pride and took remedial math classes, studying with a friend who taught grade school. This week she graduated from nursing school! You can make it happen if you are willing to put in the effort. Good luck.
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    I completely agree with GrnTea's sage advice - which was offered from her perspective as a highly experienced educator. It was not meant as a virtual 2X4 to the OP.

    Not everyone is capable of becoming a nurse. If this is the case, it is best to make this determination before expending massive amounts of resources (emotional, physical, fiscal, etc) on a venture that is doomed to failure - and which may also leave a lasting scar to one's self esteem. Wouldn't it be better to move in another direction that is a better fit for one's skills and abilities?

    Practically speaking - even if a student squeaks by - obtaining special consideration for a learning disability, this accommodation will disappear after graduation. Nursing practice requires continuous learning - sometimes under very uncontrolled circumstances. How will patient safety be affected if the nurse is unable to learn 'on the fly' quickly enough to manage unexpected/sudden clinical issues?
    GrnTea likes this.


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