assessments

  1. any special tips or something to learning assessment techniques? we are on HEENT, already did skin, hair, and nails, we had to practice on a fellow student, but just the skin hair and nails assessment alone took almost an hour, which the instructor said was ok, should it really take that long?

    what about when you add all the other stuff in?? lol, or is this something really small that i am stressing out too much over?
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   BarbPick
    Quote from nurseshawna
    any special tips or something to learning assessment techniques? we are on HEENT, already did skin, hair, and nails, we had to practice on a fellow student, but just the skin hair and nails assessment alone took almost an hour, which the instructor said was ok, should it really take that long?

    what about when you add all the other stuff in?? lol, or is this something really small that i am stressing out too much over?
    Now think about this. You are assigned 6 patients to care for during your eight hour shift. This includes the assessment and all of their care. In real life you are assessing from the moment you enter your shift until you go home. You will walk in and think to yourself ( do I see the sheets or the gown move, ok yes they are breathing) (is their color the way it is supposed to be) (are they moving extremities) this is as you get to the door. You will get it down to less then 5 minutes, the difference from school is you will not think about it and automatically just do it and remember all the findings.
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    I agree with Barb. If a pt makes eye contact and says hello when you introduce yourself, that already tells you a lot, right there.
    Pt breathing, alert, tracking, at least minimally oriented, not likely in any acute distress. You will learn to listen to heart, lung and bowel sounds all in a few seconds.

    In real life, you will only have about five mins or less for your total assessment. Each interaction, or even passing glance at a pt as you rush by is a continuing, ongoing assessment.
  5. by   BarbPick
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I agree with Barb. If a pt makes eye contact and says hello when you introduce yourself, that already tells you a lot, right there.
    Pt breathing, alert, tracking, at least minimally oriented, not likely in any acute distress. You will learn to listen to heart, lung and bowel sounds all in a few seconds.

    In real life, you will only have about five mins or less for your total assessment. Each interaction, or even passing glance at a pt as you rush by is a continuing, ongoing assessment.
    Isn't it great to do some old fashioned sharing . This is the way it should always be. I remember looking up to nurses a few semesters ahead and knew eventually I would be where they were and beyond, a graduate. Thank you Hello Nurse.
  6. by   wonderbee
    We're just beginning assessment as well. Things that come so natural to experienced nurses require a great deal of thought to us beginners. I think it's like riding a bike. When you're learning, it's so draining because you're thinking about your every move. Once you've learned, it's automatic.

    I did find a great website for heart sounds with interactive video that shows the cycle of S1 and S2. http://www.blaufuss.org/ Check it out
  7. by   nurseshawna
    thanks for the advice and the link, i have saved it to my favs!

    my instructor said by the end of the semester, we will have it cut down in time, i just don't see it happening right now tho, lol......

    thanks again!
  8. by   Carolanne
    Quote from RNKittyKat
    We're just beginning assessment as well. Things that come so natural to experienced nurses require a great deal of thought to us beginners. I think it's like riding a bike. When you're learning, it's so draining because you're thinking about your every move. Once you've learned, it's automatic.

    I did find a great website for heart sounds with interactive video that shows the cycle of S1 and S2. http://www.blaufuss.org/ Check it out
    Terrific link for cardiac - I start on March 15th - great reference! Thanks!

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