Assessing CVP

  1. Looking up this diuretic/antihypertensive drug and it says to assess improvement in CVP, how is that measured quantitatively? TIA
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   Carolanne
    I'm assuming CVP = cardiovascular pressure? My guess would be monitoring the BP and pulse as diuretics can cause a drop in both.
  4. by   AmiK25
    CVP=Central Venous Pressure, which is a measure of the volume of fluid (preload) contained in the right side of the heart. Basically, the CVP tells you if the patient is dehydrated (CVP too low) or fluid overloaded due to heart failure or excessive volume administration (CVP too high). So in the case of a diuretic, you would expect the CVP to be high before giving it b/c the patient has an excess of fluid you are wanting to get rid of. After the diuretic, you would expect the CVP to be lower. Normal CVP is 2-6 mm Hg. You must have some sort of central IV access to measure the CVP (Triple lumen, PA line). Hope that helps!
  5. by   nocturne716
    Is CVP also a case in which you would measure Jugular Vein distension?



    Quote from AmiK25
    CVP=Central Venous Pressure, which is a measure of the volume of fluid (preload) contained in the right side of the heart. Basically, the CVP tells you if the patient is dehydrated (CVP too low) or fluid overloaded due to heart failure or excessive volume administration (CVP too high). So in the case of a diuretic, you would expect the CVP to be high before giving it b/c the patient has an excess of fluid you are wanting to get rid of. After the diuretic, you would expect the CVP to be lower. Normal CVP is 2-6 mm Hg. You must have some sort of central IV access to measure the CVP (Triple lumen, PA line). Hope that helps!
  6. by   memphispanda
    JVP would indicate an increased CVP. You can measure the distance the JVD rises above sternum at a 45 degree angle and get a pretty good idea of how much CVP is elevated.

    Here's something else to try. This only works well if you have nice fat veins that can easily be seen.
    While standing, put your arm down by your side and look at the veins in your hand. They should be nice and fat. If you slowly raise your arm, the veins will gradually flatten, until they should be completely flat at the level of your heart. If they stay distended above the level of the heart then CVP is elevated.

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