Are clinicals flexible? - page 2

I dont have a car right now so if i enter nursing school without a car, i will still be able to go to clinicals, right?... Read More

  1. Visit  Stcroix profile page
    2
    To complicate matters further, you may be required to have some 'off site ' clinical days. By that I mean, you might have days where you go to a nursing home, hospice, home health, psych facility, etc. It could be very difficult to car pool because the off site assignments are usually not for the whole class, and maybe only a handful of students may be going there at one time. Check with your program. Maybe a scooter?
    Hygiene Queen and grownuprosie like this.
  2. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    0
    Quote from Stcroix
    To complicate matters further, you may be required to have some 'off site ' clinical days. By that I mean, you might have days where you go to a nursing home, hospice, home health, psych facility, etc. It could be very difficult to car pool because the off site assignments are usually not for the whole class, and maybe only a handful of students may be going there at one time. Check with your program. Maybe a scooter?
    Very true! I could probably find someone in my clinical group to carpool with to the hospital, but our outpatient clinicals are usually done alone. No one to ride with.
  3. Visit  Sun0408 profile page
    1
    Make things easy on yourself and buy a car. It doesn't have to be a brand new one.
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
  4. Visit  MrChicagoRN profile page
    0
    If you don't want to buy a car, can you rent one, or live somewhere where they have zip-car or I-Go?
  5. Visit  Wrench Party profile page
    0
    Questions to ask yourself if you want to pursue nursing school without a car:

    1) Are there reliable public transit options? Do they run when some clinicals start? (5-6 am)
    2) If I ride a bike, do I know basic bike maintenance? Traffic laws? Can I carry all the stuff I need (uniform, notebook,
    equipment, laptop, etc.?)
    3) Am I disciplined enough to use these transportation options? (if you take the bus and it has a transfer, are you able
    to figure out what time initially you need to get on it?)
    4) Do I have a backup transportation system in place (i.e. bus doesn't run on the weekend, can I hitch a ride to the hospital
    with a classmate instead?)
    5) Do you have the social skills and money to chip in with carpooling?
  6. Visit  grownuprosie profile page
    1
    i did not see this mentioned before, so i will chime in. What about a cab? it would be much cheaper than buying a car if that is the only thing you are using it for. For me anyway, my clinicals have been in different counties and the cab fare would be ~$40 one way, but still cheaper than gas/ parking at the facility/ parking at my home when not in use/ cost of the car/ maintenance. If your city has public transportation, you can take that home so you are only paying cab fares one way.

    also, spread the net out to your friends. Does any of them have a car that you can borrow?
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
  7. Visit  vintagePN profile page
    0
    I slacked and never got my licsence...working on it now. Clinicals are not flexible and they don't care how you get there. My clinical this semester is in my city but a pretty far bus ride, the bus doesn't run early enough to get me there on time. I had to ask a classmate if I could ride with her and she has to go out of her way to get me...I feel bad. In subsequent semesters my placement could be in any of the surrounding cities..up to an hour away. I have no clue what to do...it sucks. I wish I had a car.
  8. Visit  grownuprosie profile page
    0
    Oh, and a classmate of mine figured out that a cheap hotel near the far away hospitals is cheaper than a cab. so she takes the bus there the night before, sleeps, goes to clinical the next day then busses home.

    nothing is perfect, but it is alwayse doable.
  9. Visit  erinmarie320 profile page
    0
    As previous posters have mentioned, it will depend on your school and community whether a car is necessary. For my school it is written right in the student handbook, and in pre-application literature, that if you wish to attend this program you are required to have a car. We can have clinical 2+ hours away, and transit is not always an option (and I live in a major city with 1 million+ population). They will not place us based on our address, it is completely random and we are expected to be there no matter our situation.
  10. Visit  checkmarks0725 profile page
    0
    No, clinicals are not very flexible. Most programs I've heard of will not give you a say in where you are placed/what times you are scheduled. You are expected to show up when and where.
    I lived around the corner from one of the hospitals my school did rotations at......never got placed there. The one an hour away from school....got to spend two semesters there. It happens.
  11. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    0
    Quote from mee9mee9
    I dont have a car right now so if i enter nursing school without a car, i will still be able to go to clinicals, right?
    Go to school in a city with reliable public transportation and you won't have a problem. I had a car on campus when I was in school but we always car-pooled to clinicals (and I rarely drove since I had a small car that didn't fit the entire clinical group) or took the subway. In my city, the subway starts running at 5am. In the first nearly 5 years of my career, I worked in the hospital and never drove until the last six-ish months on the job. Even then, I only drove on nights (because I didn't want to take 2 buses home after working a night shift and could park at a meter overnight for free) and on Sundays (because street parking was free and the bus didn't start until 7am). I took the train when I lived in one part of the city and then the bus (2 buses actually) when I moved to another part of the city.
  12. Visit  CacaoHeart profile page
    0
    With my program the clinical site changes once or twice per semester. We have no say in what clinical site we get, and can't trade with classmates. This semester I lucked out and got a spot 3 miles from my house that I can bike to. Other semesters it may be a 40 minute drive, with expected arrival time being between 6 and 6:45am depending on instructor. If you're more than 15 minutes late to clinical, you're sent home. If you miss more than 2 days of clinical in a semester (for any reason), you're done with the program but can reapply for admission next year.

    Look at public transportation, reliable carpools, or biking if it's within 10 miles. You could ask the program director what clinical sites the program uses and get an idea of what kind of commute you might be looking at. One classmate upon realizing how much of a drive she'd have decided to stay at a friend's house near the hospital the night before each week so it'd be a less insane commute. This semester we have to go to the hospital the day before clinical to get data on our patient, so our "day off" with no classes scheduled is actually our busiest day of the week. That said, I'm really enjoying my time on the floor.
  13. Visit  MusicalCoffee profile page
    0
    At my school, our clinical coordinator explained that the way we are placed was through a computer system. Our addresses are used and that is one way they try and place us. It also depends on where they have contracts and the opening/availability in the specific area (pediatrics, psych, etc) because we share hospitals with other schools. Some of our sites will be up to 2 hours away. They wont work around our schedule, if we have another job or whatnot, because as previous posters have said, you have a set clinical site and time to be there and there isn't any wiggle room. We were told, however, that they will work with us if we have transportation issues or babysitting issues for those with children, which I thought was very nice. If we tell them ahead of time, they'll work with us to try and come up with a solution. In that sense, I really love my school because the professors and faculty really seem to care and want to help you succeed.

    I would definitely look into possibly carpooling. Another perk going that route: those first day jitters might not be as bad if you have a few classmates to go with, rather than getting there by yourself.


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