Are A's a thing of the past? - page 5

Before I got into nursing school I was an A student, not A-, but A. So far I have not gotten a single A. I got an A- in pathopharm and am going to have an A- in Peds/Ob with the rest of my classes... Read More

  1. by   jackson145
    Quote from StanleyRW
    What about A students that slacked off and slept in class?
    sounds like my husband, talk about frustrating!
  2. by   BoonersmomRN
    LOL!

    Well I guess I dont see how that is possible-haha. If they sleep through class and they never study ...that means they never crack a book( cant look at notes because they didnt take any since they were fast asleep)....then that person must be the BEST test taker in the whole world to walk into a test blind and remain an "A" student. I'd love to shake their hand and then I would never, ever let them be my nurse.


    Seriously though every A student I have ever known has put time and energy into their studies...even if the material came easy to them.
  3. by   jackson145
    Quote from BoonersMom
    LOL!

    Well I guess I dont see how that is possible-haha. If they sleep through class and they never study ...that means they never crack a book( cant look at notes because they didnt take any since they were fast asleep)....then that person must be the BEST test taker in the whole world to walk into a test blind and remain an "A" student. I'd love to shake their hand and then I would never, ever let them be my nurse.


    Seriously though every A student I have ever known has put time and energy into their studies...even if the material came easy to them.
    My husband never studied and never even brought a book into the house. He had no previous nursing background at all. I don't know how he made the grades he did. I'd never want him taking care of me (but that has always been the case).
  4. by   BoonersmomRN
    Well like they say...in statistics there is always an outlier
  5. by   futurecnm
    Quote from StanleyRW
    What about A students that slacked off and slept in class?
    i think this would be very rare. Every A student I have known (including myself!) studies a LOT and puts a lot of time and effort into their grades. Getting an A is a lot of work (for most!)
  6. by   Mexarican
    Yea no doubt, i consider the material to come easy to me. I don't have to chase it around to long in order to get it. But at the end of the day i still have to put it in front of me to get a grasp of it. I do have the benefit of being a really great test taker but that probably would only get me a passing "C" all by itself. But again like i said before...at the end of the day i wouldn't be the best nurse for the job because i wasn't putting my best. I would much rather have a "C" nurse who worked their a$% off and didn't leave anything to chance than a slacker with C's who has the ability to be making A's but chooses not to put in the work, just enough to "get by"! All C's are not created equal!!

    Mex
  7. by   lilyteen
    Quote from nurz2be
    C = RN

    I think that this very statement is HORRID. I am sorry but I WON'T, REFUSE TO BE, and am appalled at nursing students who use this phrase. If your child or my child were in a serious situation would you want a nurse or a doctor working on them that had this for an attitude? NO WAY! I don't think that this particular phrase says anything to uplift the nursing profession. Nurses, at times and in certain circles, are not considered "intelligent." It is phrases like these, used by students that push that point of view. I am an A student, I will be an A nurse or I won't be one. I won't settle for myself or my patients to be someone who just does enough to get by. I think it is very very sad for the nursing community when phrases like these and others flow through students. There are students in my class who started out their pre reqs with this "fun little saying." Those are the very students who complain about tests being too hard, instructors being too hard, who are BARELY making the minimum grade required to pass each class. I think students need to take a deep look into what having this type of attitude brings. Trust me, if your child was in a NICU or PICU and you had to choose between a nurse who pushed him/herself and made the grades or one who just did enough to get by (C = RN), you would pick the one who pushed themselves.

    VERY VERY sad, indeed.
    Sorry for saying this...but I felt compelled to respond to this post. I will venture to say this...even though your bone of contention appears to be with the person who posted the quote, "C=RN", I feel compelled to add my two cents. I pose this question to you...what patient in this country is going to know whether you had As during college or the passing grade (albeit B or C)? What hiring institution will know that you have an A or the passing grade as set forth in your school's policy? Do new RN graduates bring their transcripts to their interviews? And if so, does the hiring official only select the person with the A? I know some students who can memorize the material so efficiently that they are able to secure the so-called coveted A in theory. However, I know many MORE students who fall within the less-than-perfect A category who are incredible people. People who are extremely caring, compassionate, loving, kind, competent...and yet only obtained perhaps Bs. To make a long story short, I am basically saying that I truly believe that the vast majority of the students who are in nursing as a profession do get less-than-perfect grades...but that has absolutely nothing to do with the fact that they are competent and caring people who perform outstanding services to their patients. What kind of world would the nursing profession be with only straight-A students being able to care for the public??? With the extremely high drop-out rate of nursing students as it as, not to mention the nation-wide nursing shortage that we are experiencing, it behooves me to think that we would insist on absolute 'book' perfection but not absolute perfection in interpersonal skills. The ability to memorize complex terminology does not equate necessarily to a stellar nurse.
    Last edit by lilyteen on Dec 13, '07
  8. by   Rexie68
    of course we should all strive to do our best, but we have a saying in school ......c's get degrees!! it's not meant to slack off, but, gosh, i'm going to get a c in my english class because i'm not a "scholarly writer." who cares?? i doubt that my patients will!! i'm going to school full time, working full time, single mom of four, had emergency surgery last week (ovaries are all gone, the one i had left twisted on itself and died....) and guess what...i might not get straight a's!! i'm getting an a in nursing so far, but even that might drop at some point. darnit, if i graduate with a c and pass nclex, i'm still going to be able to put rn after my name!!! :angryfire
  9. by   love-d-OR
    I have always been an A/B student. When I got to nursing I became a B/A student. Whether you get an A or C, what matters is your clinical knowledge and application skills. As some one stated earlier, we all know those A students that know everything in the book and can write perfect careplans, but when it comes to actually dealing with patients they have no clue where to begin! I don't advocate that people should just lazy around and be on the barely passing line, but I really dont think anyone in their right mind gets to that line intentionally.

    A career coach once said "the really smart ones are not the A students that stay up all night studying, but the C students, because they figured out the minimum amount of work it takes to get a degree" LOL!
  10. by   kasia2
    I'm a B student and certainly I wont lose sleep over not getting A.
  11. by   Virgo_RN
    Quote from love-d-OR
    As some one stated earlier, we all know those A students that know everything in the book and can write perfect careplans, but when it comes to actually dealing with patients they have no clue where to begin!
    Okay, this is the anecdote that really chaps my behind! The "A student who has no people skills" anecdote. We all hear it. I've even heard an instructor tell this anecdote in lecture. Why do getting As and having compassion for human beings seem to be mutually exclusive in some people's minds?

    I have personally known ONE person like this. Fantastic student, but as one clinical instructor said, she needed a visit from the "Compassion Fairy". However, the vast majority of A students, myself included, are both great students and wonderful, compassionate nurses.

    What irritates me about the "A anecdote" is that it gets thrown out there so frequently, as if it is the rule and not the exception. I think its intent may be good, to illustrate that one need not be an exceptional student to be a great nurse. But in reality, what I think it does is make the A students look like a bunch of cold hearted bookworms with no real world knowledge or people skills. It is a stereotype that gets far too much air time.

    I have literally been shunned by fellow students for my grades. I have been asked to tank exams so that I don't "throw off the curve" for the other students. One would think that rather than shunning the A student, this would be the student you'd WANT in your study group. It hurts because I have feelings, like any other human being, despite being an A student.

    Since when did getting As become something to be ashamed of?
    Last edit by Virgo_RN on Dec 14, '07
  12. by   MB37
    There are also a lot of C students without people skills. There are so many generalizations that you keep hearing from people - the anecdote about A students, the one about how BSN programs only teach you how to write papers and you don't get any clinical experience, the one about how all nurses eat their young, and the one about how "every" student drops a letter grade when they get into nursing school - my grades have gone up, I never had a 4.0 when I got my first degree. Just do your best! There are some intelligent people in my class who have a hard time with NCLEX questions, and it's tough for them to get As on any exams because of it. They might know the material as well as I do, but they overthink questions or get test anxiety. The only people I have a problem with are those who cheat (we had one guy already, but he wasn't caught in the act so he's still in the program) and those who brag about not studying, and then are surprised to see that they need a 94 on the final to pass the class.
  13. by   futurecnm
    Yes, it really bothers me too when people assume an A student won't have any people skills. I have had many reviews with my clinical instructors and they have all said that I am a great communicator and do well with my patients. And, yes, some employers do ask for transcripts. And yes, if the job you are going for has many applicants, your grades could come into play. I know some nurse managers who have told me this. As a C student you probably won't have any problem getting a job, but it could prevent you from getting the job you really want.

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