Are all A&P classes fast paced??? - page 2

OK, I started class on the 19th, barely three weeks ago, and we have a test over the FIRST 10 chapters in A&P next week!!! Our instructor goes so fast, that he types up his class notes on his... Read More

  1. by   ggfifirn05
    I took A & P 1 last semester, in a 12 week class. Our teacher was a retired neurosurgeon, who kept exclaiming during the entire semester that he had a full year in medical school to learn what we were expected to learn in those 12 weeks! Our textbook had a "study guide" at the end of each chapter, that basically outlined the important facts for each chapter...we were expected to have read that before each lecture, but by the middle of the semester, he also said, like other posters have mentioned, to just read the chapters on our own. I started out making flash cards, used the anatomy coloring book (especially for the skeletal & muscular systems) and the CD ROM that came with our textbook. But after the first test, we realized the questions were just about word-for-word from the CD ROM practice tests. So by the end of the semester, all I was doing was reading & highlighting the "important" stuff in the chapters, going over the study guide, and doing the practice tests on the CD ROM. I ended up with an "A", so it guess my plan worked.

    I really liked this teacher, because he used his experience as a neurosurgeon to relate things to the class in a "real life" scenario. I will be taking A & P 11 with him in November.

    No one knows better than you what your learning style is, so just trust your instincts, and just try to stay focused. And don't procrastinate in your studying...I always start to stress too much when I've allowed myself to get behind. Good luck!
  2. by   RNConnieF
    I always previewed the material, made my own notes then I used a highlighter to highlight points made by the teacher and a colored pen to make additions. I found that I listened better if my notes where already done. I'm a audio learner so it really helped me. After class I would come home and make note cards from the class based on my notes. Come test time I used the cards to study. Making the cards after class reinforced the content so when it came time to sudy for a test it was at least the 4th time I had gone over the material, once when I previewed it, once when I went over it in class, and once when I made the note cards. I also liked having the cards cause I could carry them around with me and wip them out whenever I had a few seconds to myself. Good Luck!
  3. by   studentdeb
    I am taking A&P I now and also began on the 19th. We had our first test last night. It covered 3 chapters, but the instructor, who is a genecist (not sure of spelling) goes very fast so the whole time we are in class, we are writing. The test was very hard, alot of short answer questions, but I'm pretty sure I passed but maybe with a C. Thank goodness, I have a different lab teacher which we had a test in that class also last night, but that test was fairly easy. I seem to be able to identify better than define.

    It appears that A&P is just not an easy course with all the info needed to cover. We also had a chapter of chemistry. I'm just glad this one is over and 5 more tests to go.

    Good luck to you!!!
  4. by   ashemson
    Thanks everyone - great ideas! It's almost impossible for me to study right after I get home, with my 3 daughters climbing on me! But I am going to get flash cards today, and I think that will help alot! Thanks again...
  5. by   Debbie5
    Here's what our instructor told us to do.
    1. Tape lecture

    2. Read notes as soon as possible after lecture and read the upcoming chapter for the next lecture.

    3. This is the biggie! Get a medical terminology book and learn to break words down. Ex. Cardio always refers to the heart. Pseudo means false - cyte means cell, etc... This helps tremendously. He said if we learn to break words down we should be able to eliminate at least two choices on a multiple choice type test.
  6. by   babynursewannab
    Originally posted by Debbie5
    Here's what our instructor told us to do.
    3. This is the biggie! Get a medical terminology book and learn to break words down. Ex. Cardio always refers to the heart. Pseudo means false - cyte means cell, etc... This helps tremendously. He said if we learn to break words down we should be able to eliminate at least two choices on a multiple choice type test.
    BINGO!
  7. by   Lisa1970
    Try taping the lectures, it really helps me. I listem to them as I am rewritting the notes. I hear a lot of stuff that I missed durning te lecture.

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