Anyone out there seeking a commission after graduation?? - page 2

I have been in the navy for 9 years as a Hospital Corpsman (4 years active, 5 reserves). I am very much looking forward to becoming a Nurse Corpse Officer after I graduate. I'm as excited about... Read More

  1. by   jnette
    Thanx, Guys... have just been curious for a long time.

    Not that I'm in any position to rejoin or anything...DH would certainly not be agreeable but I still often dream about my times in the service.. plus was RAISED in it, so it's family to me and I often still miss it.

    Sooooooo... if I were to be widowed for any sudden or unexpected reason, it's still something I would consider at least as a "reservist"... too old for "regular", that's for sure !
  2. by   straba
    I work with a PA who also happens to be a reserve A.F. officer, and he says a BSN is required for a commission. As far as a Navy warrant officer goes, I personally have never worked with a warrant in navy medicine (9 years). Again, Army will commission folks with an ADN but the age limitation is more strict, and advancement is limited!! Oh well, GO NAVY!!!!!!!
  3. by   patriot222
    Been there, done that. I accepted a commission(ANC) after graduation from a 4yr BSN program. One of the best decisions I ever made.
    Basic was a cakewalk, although they did like to play head-games. Great travel opportunities, and a super learning environment.
    Very important though... Watch your recruiter carefully. Remember what their job is. They want you. You can do a lot more negotiation that you think. Think location and type of nursing you want. Research what and where their specialty courses are and ask to be considered for one of them ( You do not have to go directly into basic med/surg unless you want to)Most of all get everything in writing. I refused to sign if they we not willing to put me at the base and floor I wanted. They make some phone calls and made it happen. Keep a good relationship going with your recruiter; if he or she knows you will make their lives a living hell if they screw up they will try harder.
    I will never regret my active duty time. I later got out ... decided that two active duty soldiers with highly deployable MOS s and small children was not the way to go. Now I'm holding down the fort at home. By the way prior service make the best nurse corp officers! Good luck - I hope your dreams come true!
  4. by   chiefswife
    Also, Basic Training is a "gentleman's" course. It is something like 2 weeks. Lou won't be there for you to "never forget".
    I thought to join the Army as an officer w/o going thru ROTC in college, you had to go thru regular basic training. Could someone clear this up for me?
  5. by   caligirl
    I am thinking about getting a commision in the Air Force. I am prior enlisted in the Air Force and my husband is in the Air Force. He is a Missile officer and does not get deployed often.
    I don't know if the Air Force will accept me since I have a child and military married to military is hard to get if you have children. I guess it all depends on how hungry the Air Force is for Nurses at that time. I miss the military!

    Sara,
    I don't know about the Army, but the Air Force does not require regular Basic Training. It is called COT - Commisioned Officer Training and it is different than regular OTS -Officer Training Course. It is easier and shorter. I guess it could be considered a gentlemen's course. I think it is 6 weeks. It is the one the doctors and lawyers go to as well.

    I believe Air Force Nurses get a $5,000 a year bonus. Here is a link to the military pay scale http://www.dfas.mil/money/milpay/pay/2003paytable.pdf

    If you are prior enlisted you will get 0-1E pay. If not, just regular 0-1.

    Tammy
  6. by   CathyNurse2b
    Basic training is not a "gentleman's" course. It is the training required of any and all enlisted persons, man or woman, to orient you to the military way of doing things. I went through Army basic training, and while it was hard, I thought I could do anything by the time I finished. Officer candidates go through Officer Candidate School.

    Cathy
  7. by   Tanker
    "Regular" basic training and OCS (Officer Candidate School - basic for "regular" - non-medical/legal) is NOT a "gentleman's course. I have been through both and wouldn't want to do again. What I was referring to was the 2-3 week Officer Orientation Course that the medical/legal officers go through upon commissioning. This is a different course than Basic or OCS.

    I can tell you that you can tell the difference between "regular" officers and newly commissioned medical officers. Especially the way they wear their uniforms. It's a hoot sometimes. We had a good laugh at the expense of a new Battalion Physician (CPT) who had no cover, wasn't wearing his rank and insignia properly, a hair cut (?) that was long past due and was wearing the uniform like he was on a camping trip. Me being only an LT at the time couldn't laugh out loud in front of the troops. Had to square him away when we were away from the troops. But they new.
  8. by   kc_jellybean
    Originally posted by Tanker
    Also, Basic Training is a "gentleman's" course. It is something like 2 weeks. Lou won't be there for you to "never forget".
    Call me a wuss :imbar but this is reassuring to me!
  9. by   CathyNurse2b
    kc_jellybean, it's not just two weeks. I went through six weeks of what I thought was hell. It did make me tougher in the end, though.
  10. by   nadia562002
    I just have my 2 cents to add. I joined the Coast Guard for 4 years as a dental assistant/EMT. Then got out to pursue college and joined the Navy Reserves. I loved the Coast Guard but hated the Navy. The Navy sent me on orders to Bremerton but I was supposed to be 4 hours away from there. THat was my first set. The second set of orders was messed up but not so bad. On the 3rd set of orders, they lost them. Then came Sep 11. I had to get out before they lost me by sending me to Japan when I am supposed to be in Austrailia. WHo knows when I would have been able to make it back home again. The Navy left me highly dissalusioned so I got out at the end of that first enlistment. Screwing up on 2 sets out 3 sets of orders was enough for me. Now I have my BSN no thanks to the Navy. After 8 years of service, I served my country enough. Its time for me to enjoy my life as a civilian serving the people in my community.
  11. by   caligirl
    Originally posted by CathyNurse2b
    Basic training is not a "gentleman's" course. It is the training required of any and all enlisted persons, man or woman, to orient you to the military way of doing things. I went through Army basic training, and while it was hard, I thought I could do anything by the time I finished. Officer candidates go through Officer Candidate School.

    Cathy
    I saw a special on i think discovery about Army basic training. Oh lordy. I don't know if I could make it through! (Marines as well). Air Force Basic training was easy. I think the hardest part was the lack of sleep and even the lack of sleep in basic doesn't compare to the lack of sleep as a new mom. (trying to wink.. hope it works.. Im new to this site...)
  12. by   caligirl
    KC.. Here is a link to the Air Force COT program.. It is 4 weeks...

    http://ots.afoats.af.mil/

    No, I am not a recruiter.
  13. by   fourbirds4me
    The medical version of OBC (officer basic course) is 12 weeks long and is considered a "gentleman's course". You do have to pass a PT test but none of it is really "in your face". If you don't have any prior military experience then you are required to do 2 additional weeks prior to the start of your "cycle". I have a friend who attended last fall and a friend who will attend this fall. AMEDD OBC is in San Antonio, TX. Also have a friend who is going into the navy but am not so sure about that.

    http://healthcare.goarmy.com/sixcorp...corp/index.htm
    http://www.cs.amedd.army.mil/obc/index.htm

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