Anyone Here Have Social Anxiety? - page 2

I will be starting school FINALLY this fall...not NS yet just pre reqs. I was wondering if any of you have an anxiety issue. I haven't been in school for 10 years, been raising my kiddos, and I am... Read More

  1. by   bklynborn
    Celexa works for me.....................
  2. by   mshultz
    Quote from jill48
    I don't exactly have a social anxiety, at least not when it comes to speaking in front of people. I'm a natural debater (I almost said master debator ) and it's one of my true passions. But when I was in nursing school I had more of a social urination disorder. At least that is what I named it. There were about 30 people in my class, with 27 of them female. We all had break at the same time, and there was always an endless line coming from the one female bathroom in the place, which had only two stalls. It never failed that by the time it was my turn, I could not pee to save my life. After a while I think it was just stuck in my head and became a psychological thing. Can't even believe I made it out of school without a kidney infection or UTI from holding it in so long. If something like that were to happen now, someone would have to forcefully restrain me from using the mens bathroom when those 3 guys were done.
    I have the same problem. When I lived in an apartment many years ago, an elderly man was telling me about his hospital experience. The nurse was watching as he was unsuccessfully attempting to urinate. He finally explained to her that he could not urinate in front of an audience, and asked her to leave. She did so reluctantly, and he was then able to urinate.

    As he was telling me his story, I realized that I would have the same problem. Many years later, I ended up in the Critical Care Unit with a bad GI bleed. When I told the nurse I needed to urinate (I really do use the terms "urinate" and "defecate" in real life!), she got a plastic urinal and told me not to stand unless I had to.

    I told her I needed to be alone. As she was leaving, I said that public urination was not one of my talents. She seemed to understand, and I always had privacy when I needed to urinate or defecate.

    It is not a matter of being seen naked by either sex; I quickly got used to that. In fact, this first CCU nurse had given me a sponge bath, which I appreciated. Some of us just need our privacy. Trying to urinate when someone else is waiting for you to finish is especially stressful.

    As far as using the men's restroom, I have heard that this is routine at one of the outside concert venues in my area. The women use it (and at the same time as the men, too) because of the long lines at the women's restroom.
  3. by   jdbutterfly17
    Hi everyone... as to your question, I was diagnosed with social anxiety 3 and a half years ago before I started UNC- I started taking Zoloft and it has truly changed my life. It takes about 2 weeks to "kick in" but it is very worth it. In addition to being anxious over public speaking, I was also petrified to introduce myself to others. Right now I am done with my first week of nursing school and have never been so happy (or so overwhlemed!) I am making new friends and we had our first mock interview in lab with a patient (our lab partner) and I was nervous but it went really well. Just know that you are not alone and it can get better... yes you can try being more confident but the medication works so well that I dont understand why you wouldnt try it. Both my father and I are both taking it and it has completely changed our family dynamic. If you want to ask me any specific questions just let me know... good luck with everything!!!
  4. by   DutchgirlRN
    If you're just worried about speaking in front of class that is not considered social anxiety. That's just doing something you're not used to doing and you will get used to it with practice.

    Social anxiety disorder is a phobia. Those afflicted have a persistent, intense, and chronic fear of being watched and judged by others and being embarrassed or humiliated by their own actions. Their fear may be so severe that it interferes with work or school, and other ordinary activities. Physical symptoms accompany the intense anxiety of social phobia and include palpitations, profuse sweating, trembling, nausea, and difficulty talking and if not treated often leads to agoraphobia.
  5. by   beck_79
    I've had it since I was 12. It cycles with me- gets worse and better, but never really goes away. At my worst, I was practically a hermit. Going back to school is a huge step for me. I'm now taking Celexa and beta blockers and it has helped tremendously. Also, I'll be seeking out the counseling services of my college to help me deal with the stresses of nursing school- for someone with social anxiety the thought of critical instructors, numerous presentations, and competetive peers is a nightmare! But I'm going to get through it, darn it. I'm tired of this holding me back. Good luck to everyone!
  6. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from beck_79
    I've had it since I was 12. It cycles with me- gets worse and better, but never really goes away. At my worst, I was practically a hermit. Going back to school is a huge step for me. I'm now taking Celexa and beta blockers and it has helped tremendously. Also, I'll be seeking out the counseling services of my college to help me deal with the stresses of nursing school- for someone with social anxiety the thought of critical instructors, numerous presentations, and competetive peers is a nightmare! But I'm going to get through it, darn it. I'm tired of this holding me back. Good luck to everyone!
    YOU GO GIRL! YOU ROCK!
  7. by   jdbutterfly17
    DutchgirlRN:
    You are exactly right in the description of social anxiety disorder... it is debilitating- it makes even the smallest and seemingly "easy" (at least to other) actions relatively impossible to do. Walking through a crowd of people, introducing oneself to others, embarrassment, fear of rejection, as well as an overwhelming sense of being judged and being found wanting. This is a terrible thing to have and I am glad to know that someone else is as familiar as I am with the problem. As to beck_79... I too have had this most of my adult life- fortunately I sought help as you did. I am so proud of the attitude in which you proceed with obstacles. Counseling does help! Just know that you are there for a reason... you are smart and talented and you can and you will overcome any obstacle in your way if you believe in yourself. Do not let your fear overcome your talent... do not let others make you feel insignificant because you are wonderful!!! :spin: Good luck with everyone and do not let others tell you to "get over it" - this is a serious phobia that needs special attention and there is no shame is getting the help you need.
  8. by   sdizzle
    beta blockers Fin' rule for dealing with public speaking. I took 10 mg of Enderol for my speech I gave at graduation last week. The difference was amazing - I just got up, waltzed to the podium, and gave my speech - no nerves, at all. Perviously, I forgot to breath, shook, got a super dry mouth, had a pounding heart, the works. I will def. use it again in situations where I need to have my sympathetic nervous system under control.
  9. by   lizzyberry
    Quote from cdietrich404
    I will be starting school FINALLY this fall...not NS yet just pre reqs. I was wondering if any of you have an anxiety issue. I haven't been in school for 10 years, been raising my kiddos, and I am scared to death. I have always hated getting in front of the class to do a oral report, my face would get red and i would shake. I am taking a med to help me but still i am so freaked out.

    Any one else????

    Cheryl
    mommy to 4
    I feel like I wrote this. So much in common!:spin:
  10. by   lizzyberry
    Quote from sdizzle
    beta blockers Fin' rule for dealing with public speaking. I took 10 mg of Enderol for my speech I gave at graduation last week. The difference was amazing - I just got up, waltzed to the podium, and gave my speech - no nerves, at all. Perviously, I forgot to breath, shook, got a super dry mouth, had a pounding heart, the works. I will def. use it again in situations where I need to have my sympathetic nervous system under control.
    Yes! And once you get rid of the physical symptoms you start to notice that giving a speech is not scary at all. So after awhile you wont even need it anymore. But I know how it is to just dread a speech because your nerves will get the best of you because you feel like giving a speech is the scariest thing. Practice makes perfect. The more you give speeches the easier it gets.
  11. by   cdietrich404
    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    If you're just worried about speaking in front of class that is not considered social anxiety. That's just doing something you're not used to doing and you will get used to it with practice.

    Social anxiety disorder is a phobia. Those afflicted have a persistent, intense, and chronic fear of being watched and judged by others and being embarrassed or humiliated by their own actions. Their fear may be so severe that it interferes with work or school, and other ordinary activities. Physical symptoms accompany the intense anxiety of social phobia and include palpitations, profuse sweating, trembling, nausea, and difficulty talking and if not treated often leads to agoraphobia.
    Actually I have all of those, I just didnt add it in my thread. I have been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. I was getting panic attacks frequently so I have been on Effexor XR for 6 months now.
  12. by   RNinSoCal
    What I would like to pass on to you as the daughter of a person with generalized anxiety disorder is that no one is thinking about you as much as you are!! I am much more pe-occupied thinking about myself than I ever will be with anyone else and that is true of most people. The cold hard fact is that the people that are most critical of others are the people who are the most insecure within themselves. Never let another person stop you from fulfilling your dreams. We are all insecure, but it is only people who are extremely insecure who ridicule and make others feel less valuable than others. Whenever someone tries to make me feel "less than" I feel sorry for them because I know that they are feeling intimidated by me. You are the only person who can keep you from attaining your highest goals and aspirations. I know this from experience.
    Best wishes to you !!
  13. by   angelinab
    I can relate to how you feel. I prefer working alone, absolutely hate group projects, but I will go to others for help when needed. Lab was a little difficult, but I would seek out the help of others when needed. Most of the time I watched videos and studied on my own, and took really good notes when new skills were being demonstrated. A comment was made on my clinical eval from one of my instructors this past semester said that I seemed to be "the loner of the group," however it went on to say that I had excellent bedside manner. The bottom line is I work alone, will seek help when needed, and don't really care what the others think. I am here to become a nurse and that is what I am going to do.

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