Any good books on delegation?

  1. Hi Everyone!

    So we just learned about delegation and management. My test is coming up and I study by doing nclex ?'s. I own seven....count em.....seven NCLEX books and not ONE of them has a single management or delegation ? in it and I heard this is a HUGE part of the real Nclex. Does anyone have any nclex books with management, prioritizing, and delegation questions in them? If so, please let me know exactly what they are so I can hurry and buy them! Thanks guys!

    Nicole
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   CountrifiedRN
    Funny you mention this, we just had this subject in our nursing trends class. We didn't have a book that covered the material so the instructor gave us power points that she had made up from several different sources.

    One of the things we had to do was to go on our State Board of Nursing website and look up what each scope of practice was for an RN, an LPN, and a CNA. An important part of delegation is to match the task with the person and their scope of practice. For example, in my state it's important to know that a CNA can't give medications, so you can't delegate to a CNA to give, say, tylenol, to a patient.

    Check out what your BON or Nursing Practice Act says about delegation.
  4. by   Angelica
    This semester we were required to buy Nursing Today, Transition and Trends. I was not thrilled at having to buy yet another book, not to mention the fact that the word "transition" makes my skin crawl (I don't know if students at other schools can relate to that). Anyway, I really like it so far. Lot's of nursing management stuff. Easy to read and offers information that I think I'll actually be able to use. It's not an NCLEX preparation type book, though.
  5. by   laurasjj
    I don't have a recommendation on a book. But we just had this lecture a few weeks ago. Our teacher (who writes NCLEX questions) pointed out certain things that are common on the NCLEX:

    * Definition of delegator & delegatee
    * RNs are the only ones to do teaching
    * Negligence (the individual who accepts assignments beyond their competence is still liable for their actions; the unlicensed personnel must notify a supervisor if they are not qualified to perform a task)
    * RNs must ask if the LPN/UAP feels comfortable with the assignment
    * Always think about whether or not the pt is hemodynamically stable
    * Admission history & physical always RN
    * Feeding a pt with stomatitis always RN (b/c it's a medical condition that unlicensed personnel aren't qualified to deal with)

    I hope these help. I can send you the powerpoint that went with the lecture, if you want it email me. lbwhittn@memphis.edu

    Laura

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