Any advice on team-leading clinical ???

  1. 0
    Hi guys. Soon we are going to be asked to do a round of team leading where we run our group of 8 people on a Med Surg floor. If it is like my training so far, I'll be thrown in without any direction. Does anyone have any advice? Thank You in advance, Doug
  2. Get our hottest student topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 3,228 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 6 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    bumpp
  6. 0
    Doug, our clinical group has been doing the team leading all semester; next week is my turn, and I don't mind telling you that I'm a bit nervous about it. Unfortunately, because I haven't done it yet, I don't have the experience behind me to advise you on yours. However, what I observed is that the TL's have been available for running/gophering and question answering. We make up the assignments for the fellow students, and we make ourselves available to make sure that things are getting done, supplies are available, the students aren't drowing or otherwise in trouble, etc. Our instructor tends to stay pretty much with the TL, working with the individual on various aspects of administrative work, like orders, callbacks, chart review, communications, etc. The students I've spoken to have been very good; they told me that it's kind of a "break" from the traditional patient care aspect of clinical experiences, but it's still very important. Organization is key, but I think that's true for most things.

    I wish you much luck and success! Are you graduating soon? We're done next month.
  7. 0
    Prioritize... as with any task any nursing. Look at your day... take a sheet with you that day (mine usually is blocked off for 8 pts and has places for me to mark times of importance for that pt) write down anything of importance, esp. sched. meds and prns and times when you can admin them. Then, prioritize your pt list. See the pts who you think are worst first, then work your way up. Schedule in a time for lunch with other nurses and try to stay on top of new orders. And, most importantly, anything that CAN be delegated (vitals, bathroom breaks, ice, etc) DELEGATE! It will save you lots and lots of time in the end! Good Luck!
  8. 0
    Thanks for the advice. Please let me know after you have worked as team leader next week. I have a long ways to go. I will be done with LPN this summer, then its off to RN next year. My wife starts LPN this Fall and I am hoping to be able to support her and our home and kids, rather than work very many hours, plus RN school. Sounds crazy doesn't it?
  9. 0
    Quote from flylearn
    Thanks for the advice. Please let me know after you have worked as team leader next week. I have a long ways to go. I will be done with LPN this summer, then its off to RN next year. My wife starts LPN this Fall and I am hoping to be able to support her and our home and kids, rather than work very many hours, plus RN school. Sounds crazy doesn't it?
    You certainly do have your plate full, but you also sound like you've got a good handle on things. I know you'll do well! I wish you much luck and success; I'll let you know how the teamleading thing works out. First one for me is tomorrow afternoon...
  10. 1
    when i was a staff nurse i was team leading for most of it. it is mostly all about knowing what your duties are and being organized. the two tools that you need to start off with are
    i began my shift by looking through the kardex and getting the names of all the patient's and their diagnoses on my report sheet. in the old days we tls had a team of 10-18 patients (depending on where i worked). then, based on what our staffing was, and sometimes we didn't know until up until the moment the shift actually started because the supervisors down in the nursing office were still juggling (floating) nursing staff around, i made actually patient assignments. i tried to assign the same patients to the same staff each day otherwise you get upset staff. you also get staff upset if they get the same difficult patients each day, so those patients need to be rotated to the staff. then, we all listen to report. take note of problem situations. if it is day shift, make sure everyone got breakfast trays when you get out of report and that you get any updates from the offgoing staff before they leave. make a quick tour of your patients to make sure they are ok and breathing. check their iv levels. hopefully, you will be starting with no problems. if not, address problems--that's what we do. docs these days make rounds in the mornings before they start their office hours, so look for them. i always tried to nail these suckers down and trot along with them when they went in to see their patients if i had a question for them. it's better to nail them in front of the patient so the patient can chip in because the patient often forgets to ask their doc things because they are so happy to just see the guy show up. (you can tell i've been doing this too long.) periodically, throughout the day, i quickly look at the charts and check for new doctors orders and then look at the doctor's progress notes. it only takes a few seconds, but this is where all the new information is. a doc can slip in, write orders and be gone in 60 seconds. i'm not kidding. some of these docs (especially the ones doing consulting work) will come to a unit while nurses are setting up a procedure room for them just to look at a chart or write orders they forgot to write before and then hightail it back to do their next procedure. i also will constantly poke my head in a patient room as i pass by and ask them, "how are you doing? what's been going on? anything happen i need to know about? what can i get for you?" it makes them feel looked after, you know they are still breathing and alive, that they had patent ivs, and you also know if they had the test that was supposed to be done for them. i never sat down. i was always on the move and i had a bad case of plantar fasciitis. by the end of the shift my report sheet was a mess of circles, "x"s and scribbles, but i knew what they meant. i left a clean, problem free group of patients to the nurse following me. and because i was a whiz with ivs they had no iv problems when i left.

    you have to live it, come home and think about how to make the next day better. it is what i did my entire career and how i eventually came up with the report sheet i made.
    donsterRN likes this.


Top