Advice to Nursing Students in Peds Rotation - page 4

by shelbs3

10,873 Views | 37 Comments

Alright I have been on days now for about 3 months and have had a nursing student placed with me more often than not. I have a different one every day for the last 3 days. I work in peds heme onc and I absolutely love it. I enjoy... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from wordsofmymouth
    I'm really surprised that students would even be allowed to study at clinicals. My school has very strict rules about what we are allowed to bring and what we should be doing at clinicals. I should (theoretically) make time to document, but definitely not study.
    This is an interesting debate. "What's the point of clinical?" When I was going through school, I already worked in a hospital as did most of my classmates. There are definitely SKILLS to be learned during clinical (IV insertion, foley caths, meds...etc. etc.) but I feel like you only need to do a handful of these skills to "get the picture" and you'll get that experience when you're working on the floor as a nurse.

    That said, clinical (for me) was a time to learn how to "think like a nurse". What's going on with my patient (big picture)? What can I expect to do for my patient? What do the labs mean? What do my patient's s/s mean? A lot of times, I felt like I was too bogged down with "tasks" and just blindly following orders when I should have been studying about what's GOING ON with my patient at clinical especially in my last two semesters
    SE_BSN_RN, i♥words, and BrandiJones12 like this.
  2. 0
    Thank You!!
    I am new to this site and your article is one of the first that I have read, and the most informative. I am still completing my pre courses before apply for nursing school and would love to read more information from people that are in your same situations with nursing students. I would love to gather more insider information from your side of "teaching" so that I am aware of the requirments that are expected of me as a nursing student.
    I have found this very informational and hope to read more from you in the future.
    Thanks again!
  3. 1
    Quote from Ciale
    A lot of times, I felt like I was too bogged down with "tasks" and just blindly following orders when I should have been studying about what's GOING ON with my patient at clinical especially in my last two semesters
    Very good point. Probably, the skills will come (a little) easier than our abilities to think like a nurse. I guess when I read "studying" I thought of studying for a test, not studying the patient, but you helped me to see it differently. Learning about the patient and putting it all together into our nurse brains is really important.
    SE_BSN_RN likes this.
  4. 0
    This is some great advice, thank you for sharing your view. I bet Peds oncology is challenging, but very rewarding! Keep up the great work, you sound like an amazing nurse.
  5. 2
    Quote from Ciale

    This is an interesting debate. "What's the point of clinical?" When I was going through school, I already worked in a hospital as did most of my classmates. There are definitely SKILLS to be learned during clinical (IV insertion, foley caths, meds...etc. etc.) but I feel like you only need to do a handful of these skills to "get the picture" and you'll get that experience when you're working on the floor as a nurse.

    That said, clinical (for me) was a time to learn how to "think like a nurse". What's going on with my patient (big picture)? What can I expect to do for my patient? What do the labs mean? What do my patient's s/s mean? A lot of times, I felt like I was too bogged down with "tasks" and just blindly following orders when I should have been studying about what's GOING ON with my patient at clinical especially in my last two semesters
    I definitely agree with this. I spent my first year of clinicals trying to help everyone as much as possible, and ended up spending my days in a to-do list way. That left me feeling completely lost as to the real art of nursing. Yay, I can make a bed and put in a catheter and answer call lights. But I could teach my 10 year old to do all of those things pretty quickly.

    When I'd pull my study materials out I had a feeling of guilt, like I should be up working. But by looking up labs, patho, care plans, etc, I AM working. I'm learning how to think like a nurse on the job, instead of going home and thinking about it all in retrospect.
    SE_BSN_RN and Satori77 like this.
  6. 0
    I haven't started nursing school yet, but this is GREAT advice. Although it should be common sense not to study in clinicals... tsk tsk
  7. 0
    What should we do when there is "down time"during our rotations. I started my rotations in OB and PEDs and sometimes the nurse I was assigned to would sit at the computer for long times or "disappear" from the unit altogether(postpartum).I dont know if it was because I was a male or she was just busy. I tried to ask questions but she seem to be preoccupied with charting so I just stopped asking. I completed my assessment but sometimes the patients get tired of student nurses taking up their time with head to toe assessment. What else can I do to improve my experience besides stand around at the nursing station? hated standing around
  8. 0
    Thank you for your post and advice.


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