Advice needed: EMT training or CNA training? - page 2

Which would you suggest for a student working towards career in CRNA? My thoughts are that EMTs also get jobs in ERs and other critical care areas...CNAs do get direct patient care and floor nursing... Read More

  1. by   CT Pixie
    Quote from ACCG
    I'm wondering if having this emt school experience would help me in any way while in LPN school. I'm excited abou LPN, but a little nervous, ince I'll be doing full time, and for all that I've heard... it is a lot to learn in such a short period of time ( 12 months) !
    I went from CNA to EMT-B to LPN (actually not licensed yet, I graduated LPN school June 6th)


    I went to LPN school full time (15 months, 6 1/2 hrs a day. No spring break, no winter break..straight through) It is a lot to learn in such a short period of time but it is doable. As proved by the many many many of us who've done it.

    Your EMT schooling will help with your LPN schooling. Especially in terms of terminology, anatomy etc.

    Best of luck. Its a long tough road but so worth the journey!
  2. by   Sandy_dfw
    Go for the EMT training. It will give you a different view point and wil help you in nursing school. I used to be a paramedic and loved it.
    Good Luck
    Sandy
  3. by   medicgirl
    Hi there. I would suggest becoming an EMT. It is SO MUCH FUN, and most people really enjoy the training. You gain a lot of assessment skills and if you get a job in the field you will see many many different things. I am a paramedic going through RN school and my training has been invaluable. Have fun!
  4. by   stormymemphis
    I have been an EMT for 7 years and have been working in a hospital as an EMT for 4 years. EMT's get paid alot more than CNA's. You get to utilize skills rather than be glorified maids.
  5. by   hypocaffeinemia
    I'd recommend EMT training in an instant over CNA. I have nothing against CNAs, but their training is largely skills-based.

    With EMT, you learn a different set of skills, but more importantly you learn basic assessment and interventions, which is in my opinion far more relevant to critical care nursing-- the area you will need experience in for CRNA school.

    Additionally, pay is marginally higher and you can learn many CNA-type skills on the job as an ER tech or a critical care tech.

    For the record, I've been through both trainings.
    Last edit by hypocaffeinemia on Jul 8, '08
  6. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    I would say that NEITHER of them is going to help you become a CRNA. Admission to a CRNA program is going to depend on your overall college grades, your grades in nursing school, the quality of your ICU experience, and your reference letters from the folks who know your work.

    Having done them both I would say do the EMT class. It's much more interesting and a more useful skill set outside of the hospital.

    In my EMT clinical time I practiced auto extraction, hazardous material response, airway management, splinting, bandaging, triage, and mass casualty response. I spent time on an ambulance and in an ER.

    In my CNA clinical time I practiced feeding patients, bathing patients, making beds, transferring patients into wheelchairs, and changing incontinent briefs -- especially the briefs; boy did I change a lot of briefs. All of those things must be learned but they're not particularly interesting nor challenging.

    If your programs of choice don't require you to be a CNA coming in (mine did), I'd say do the EMT thing for sure. CNA... well, I wouldn't.
  7. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from stormymemphis
    You get to utilize skills rather than be glorified maids.
    Ouch...

    I think you're understating the value and skill of a good CNA.
  8. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Dang it. I hate it when I jump in on a stale thread. This guy/gal was making this decision back in 2002 and hasn't logged on for over a year...

    All the opinions are worthwhile, though.
  9. by   Dr.Nurse2b
    Quote from Notanurse
    Which would you suggest for a student working towards career in CRNA? My thoughts are that EMTs also get jobs in ERs and other critical care areas...CNAs do get direct patient care and floor nursing opportunities. Any thoughts?
    Hi! I did both and I am in Georgia too...

    EMT --

    In addition to learning how to operate an ambulance and equipment associated with fire, rescue and HAZMAT you will...

    ...learn about gross anatomy, physiologic processes and specific diseases and problems that you will encounter in emergency situations.

    You will also learn some very valuable basic assessment skills, airway management technics and IV therapy.

    So basically as an EMT you will be able to assess a patient, identify problems and provide basic life supportive treatment.

    In Georgia you will not find a job unless you are an EMT - I (Intermediate) The program is 5 quarters (college credits) and provides you with lots of lab hours and about 120 hours in the field.

    You will not find work in the ER as an Intermediate but ICU will happily accept you as a CCT or Critical Care Tech. The pay is fair...as much as $15 per hour base rate.

    EMS also stands for Earn Money Sleeping -- when I first started out I worked in a rural area. I spent a lot of time reading, studying, eating, sleeping and working out.

    City EMS...the bell rings A LOT and you are running non-stop. The shifts go by quick and you can earn good money.

    CNA --

    The program I attended provided a very brief and basic gross anatomy review. You will be taught skills that will allow you to collect data and document.

    Basic ADL's or Activities of Daily Life will be your focus...feeding, bathing, oral care, perineal hygene, etc. Also bed making, body mechanics, and how to safely lift, move and transport patients.

    I would consider this a basic, entry level position. Some hospitals will run a short in house training program - 6 weeks - and turn you loose on patients.


    I would go EMT - I ...The next step is EMT-P and you need your "I" first. You get to treat patients and the job is never boring. Down the road you will be able to slide into other areas like critical care transport or life flight. CNA did not offer a challenge for me and the job is brutal on your body...especially for males...it seems I am always getting called to lift the 300 pounders.

    Hope this helps.

    My 2 Cents
  10. by   Dr.Nurse2b
    Quote from gotosleep
    Also, I don't believe that EMT training would provide you with any special expertise for aneshtesia school...
    EMT A/B/C/D/I will not offer any training relative to anesthesia... BUT EMT-P you learn endotracheal intubation which is a BIG PLUS as you will be tubing people to in order to administer anesthesia. AND you will have ACLS under your belt which is also a big plus.

    You'll be better prepared...
  11. by   Dr.Nurse2b
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    Dang it. I hate it when I jump in on a stale thread. This guy/gal was making this decision back in 2002 and hasn't logged on for over a year...

    All the opinions are worthwhile, though.

    LOL...I did the same thing...LOL

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