ADNs- I was wrong, and I apologize

  1. Hey all.

    Many of the student nurses have already heard this, but for those who were not online when I got home, I will explain.

    Many ADNs have taken a few of my posts as condescending. I didnt outward say exactly what I thought, but their conclusions may have been right.

    I did think that a BSN nurse was better than an ADN nurse. But I didnt have all the facts. Logically, I could not understand why anyone who dispute this "fact". Unfortunately, for my pride anyways", it is not always a fact.

    In theory, my thoughts were "if I have been doing assessments for 4 years, and you ADNs have been doing it for 2, have on earth can you say that I would not be better at it than you?" But, I had the wrong "facts".

    After going home this weekend to play golf, i talked to a few of my friends from highschool that have gone into nursing at different universities. They were a year behind me in school, and they are juniors in their BSN programs now. They were talking about "just starting assessments". I asked "havent you been doing that for a while now?" I was shocked to learn that they hadnt done ANYTHING related to nursing in the past 2 years. They were just starting.

    You see, in my nursing program, we start doing assessments as Freshmen, during our first semester. So I assumed that all nursing programs did that if they offered BSNs. I learned that this is NOT the case. From what I gathered, my program is an exception, not a rule. Many dont even accept students into the nursing major until 60 credit hours have been completed, and they have junior status. If this is the case, then BSN nurses who have attended those programs have no more "nursing" education than those who have an ADN, and have gone for 2 years also.

    I cried when I found out. I learned that I was SOOO wrong! I thought that since my physical assessments, and clinical skills started when I was a freshman, that all other programs were the same way. I will have had 4 years of assessment technique when I graduate with my BSN, but not all BSNs have that. Many started out when clinicals started in the JR year, not before. SO they really do only have 2 years of "nursing", and 2 years of gen eds. Same experience level, same length of nursing education...

    Not all programs are like mine, and not all programs are just for the JR/SR years... but learning this has really changed my opinion on a lot of issues.

    I honestly dont "think" I meant to be condescending in my posts, but in all likelyhood, I probably was. I am a student, 21 years old, and I often jump to a side before I have all the facts. I am still young, and still learning... but I can promise you all this. From now on I will look much more closely at the "quality" of the education, not the quantity".

    I am still very proud of my BSN education, which really is nursing for the full 4 years here, but I guess I am "more" proud of my nursing program than I actually am of my degree. I'll still wear it on my name badge, and I will still sign it once I pass my NLCEX, but i will think about it differently now. It doesnt quiet hold the same "status" symbol for me that if did before this weekend. All programs are not created equally, and all nurses are not created equally, but the degree that you hold says very little about who you are, and what you do. I always felt that I would be a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree holder first, a nurse second... I feel like I will be a Registered nurse, who happens to have a Bachelors Degree. Quite a turn around for my stubborn brain. Yeah, im still damned proud, but not of my degree as much as what I have learned, and what kind of a nurse I hope to be, and what I can do for other nurses and my patients.

    So... here is the apology part of my post. Tricia, Anne, LeAnn, and any other ADN nurses that I have offended, or have been condescending to, rather purposefully, or subconsciencely, I am truely sorry. But I can promise you this... My way of thinking has changed. Qualtily is better than quantity, experience always outranks education, and this chick KNOWS that she has a lot of learn. And I thank you for helping me learn this valuable lesson. I am sure I will be a better nurse because of what I have learned from all of you.

    Thanks for Reading,
    BrandyBSN
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   essarge
    Brandy,

    Very well said!! I'm proud of you! And without even realizing it, maybe you came up with a solution to why new grads feel sooo lost when they get into the field. Perhaps there needs to be the same standards for the various degrees across the nation, ie. ADN programs (two years of nurse training), BSN programs (four years of nurse training) etc. I know when I was in LPN school, most of the schools had the same standards and "training", so when you got into the field you weren't so lost.

    Please don't minimize the fact that you will have been in school for four years. That is still four years of education, no matter what the classes required were. And for that alone you should feel a great sense of pride!

    Again, very well said!!
  4. by   peaceful2100
    Brandy, your post was well said from my perspective because before I use to be naive and think the exact same thing. See at my school we start nursing courses in our second semester of our sophomore year and you can be admitted into the program once you have so many pre-req's completed. There are still a lot of wrong information about ADN vs. BSN education and myths floating around that needs to be changed. I would always hear that BSN's get more clinical experience then ADN's but that is not true everyone are required to have so many hours and it is up to the individual school if they surpass the minimum. I finally realize that I am not going to be any better than an ADN program once I seen my cousin who was going to the ADN program and I started my BSN program that we are learning the same fundamentals, we are going to take the same test to get a license. We will have about the same pay although some hospitals do pay about 75 cents to 1.00 more an hour but that is chunk change. If I did not have all my pre-req's done for both a bsn and ADN at the time I applied for nursing school I would have gone for an ADN but I figure hey either way it went It will take me two years I minus will spend the extra money now. I am glad I do not think what I use to think anymore. I learned Everyone should be proud of their education no matter what route they go but there is a difference and a fine line between being proud and being naive and bragging that I have more school than she/he does. Brandy had her wake up call just like I had mine and if more people are educated about reality and not the myths floating around more people would not be so naive.
  5. by   KC CHICK
    Brandy, you are AWESOME!!!
    I hope I wasn't too hard on you when I replied to some of your posts. I take things of this nature hard sometimes because I have heard the same 'outlook' from others with BSN's.
    It takes a big person to admit a mistake may have been made. Not to mention, stating it as wonderfully as you have done.

    Again, thank you.......I know you'll be a wonderful, caring RN when you go out into the world.

    Yours Truely,
    Anne
  6. by   kielydebra
    hi brandy, I am a student nurse from london, england. I am also studing for a degree in nursing. In the uk it is called the bsc. I am doing a bsc in adult nursing. The equivalant to a adn is the diploma nurse in the uk. From the start, we are told that when we qualify as it takes the same time three years, for a degree and a diploma nurse to qualify. We are all the same. We all start out as d grades. The only difference is, is that there is more pressure on the degree nurses than there is on diploma nurses. I asked my lecturers and I feel that I was speaking for other degree students too. What was the point of me doing a degree, if it's going to be tougher, then at the end of the day we were all the same! however I have been told that at the end of the day, career wise it will be better for me to have a degree, time will tell I feel that we are all nurses and we have a tough job to do, and when the chips are down I don't care if the nurse who is working as hard as I am has a degree or not. I do admire your honesty and I feel it is very brave of you to publicly apologise. We are all learning, i'ts not really the mistakes that matters its learning by them that counts. I am sure that you will make a good nurse in the future, good luck. debbie
  7. by   kielydebra
    hi brandy, I am a student nurse from london, england. I am also studing for a degree in nursing. In the uk it is called the bsc. I am doing a bsc in adult nursing. The equivalant to a adn is the diploma nurse in the uk. From the start, we are told that when we qualify as it takes the same time three years, for a degree and a diploma nurse to qualify. We are all the same. We all start out as d grades. The only difference is, is that there is more pressure on the degree nurses than there is on diploma nurses. I asked my lecturers and I feel that I was speaking for other degree students too. What was the point of me doing a degree, if it's going to be tougher, then at the end of the day we were all the same! however I have been told that at the end of the day, career wise it will be better for me to have a degree, time will tell I feel that we are all nurses and we have a tough job to do, and when the chips are down I don't care if the nurse who is working as hard as I am has a degree or not. I do admire your honesty and I feel it is very brave of you to publicly apologise. We are all learning, i'ts not really the mistakes that matters its learning by them that counts. I am sure that you will make a good nurse in the future, good luck. debbie
  8. by   MRed94
    Brandy,

    Thanks!

    I do have a question for you, though.

    I am exactly twice as old as you are, and even though I am in an ADN program, by the time I graduate, I will have over 16 years experience as an LPN.

    Now, do you think it would be honest for me to say, when some one asks me how long I have been a nurse, for me to count all the "LPN" time I have in, or should I tell them I am a new RN?

    I think the skills that I have acquired over the years count, as well as the new ones I will have.

    What do you think??

    Thanks again,

    Marla
  9. by   BrandyBSN
    Personally, i would say that "I have been a Nurse for 16 years". Even thought you were not an RN during those 16 years, you were still a nurse. If they ask, you can tell them that you went back to school, and are now an RN.

    That sound good?

    BrandyBSN
  10. by   janleb
    Marla, I recently took a job at a local hospital as a tech. I am in awe of the nurses that have as many yrs of experience as you. time permitting I follow nurses around and listen and learn. I have learned more in the last 2 months than I did all last yr. This one tech I was working with, (we were to weigh a new admit). Nurse A said that we would be able to use the chair scale. Well it turned out we had to weigh her while in bed. Not a big deal right???? well the tech made a comment about "just being an LPN" I said "big opinion for someone who isn't even a nursing student yet"SLAM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Even with the LPN where I work it is like they almost apologize for not being an RN. The one thing I feel will make me a better nurse is doing the job that i am now doing. It is not just the skills but to be able to get along with others in the healthcare field, and support others.

    The hospital I work at has a great team. i was on orientation and we were short in techs, so I had 21 pt to care for (I was new). The nurses came around and helped me finish vitals, turn pt. give care ect. I did not see anyone roll their eyes at me, be condencending, or aggravated with me.

    The thing is I don't really understand the attitudes, and what ground there is for them. With all the bickering and back biting within the ranks it is no wonder the nurses in this profession cant stand together and be heard. But this is only my opinion (as longwinded as it is
  11. by   MRed94
    Thanks for the votes of confidence.....

    I very rarely feel like "Just a LPN" when I am working, as most of the RNs come to me for answers, as I am one of the nurses who have worked in the facility the longest, and I am AGENCY!!

    Funny, life.

    Thanks again!

    Marla
  12. by   NurseStudentFall01
    Brandy,
    I appreciate your apology, though I was not personally offended. I'm happy and secure with my decision to pursue an ADN degree. Anyway, I just wanted to say no hard feelings. I value your opinion, and I'm glad you were able to get more info on ADN programs before you actually start working side by side with us!
  13. by   BrandyBSN
    Thanks,

    I appreciate that. I just need to control my temper a little more Learning to respond, instead of react, as a wise board member told me.

    BrandyBSN
  14. by   nurseleigh
    This is in reply to your post

    Now, do you think it would be honest for me to say, when some one asks me how long I have been a nurse, for me to count all the "LPN" time I have in, or should I tell them I am a new RN?


    I am sure that you meant no harm by this statement, but from the perspective of an LPN student, I was kind of offended by this statement.

    You imply that an LPN isn't a nurse. We are all "nurses", just with varying educations and roles. You should be very proud of the years you have spent as an LPN.

    Thanks for listening to my side.

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