ADN to BSN

  1. Ok, Im kinda confused. This whole nursing this is new to me (who would have known there are so many different titles to nurses)...My end goal is to make it to be a CRNA. So Im needing help with the logical steps.

    Im registering to take my prerequisites in the spring of 08 and should have all of them done by the end of summer II in 08 (total of 10 classes). By then, it will be to late to apply for Fall of 08 nursing school. So what is the next logical step? It will hopefully only be 1 semester off. Do I take classes towards my BSN and have less to do in a fast track ADN to BSN? I figure I can handle another 4-5 classes that would be very useful to my BSN but if I go off the schedule for a fast track plan, is that bad? Can you do a fast track program if you are already ahead?

    I hope this makes sense...because Im confused

    Thanks
    Tim
    •  
  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   APBT mom
    When I started my pre req's for the nursing program and I finished I had a semester left so I started taking the classes that were required for the program but I didn't have to be in the program to take. Which basically was anything that didn't have the NUR prefix. So when I get into the program all I have to take are the actual nursing classes and it'll make my course load a little lighter because they require certain classes to be taken together and mix the others in.
  4. by   JustinTJ
    I am doing the same. Taking prereqs this fall and spring, starting in Fall 2008. My nursing program has summers off, so I am taking the BSN classes over each summer until I graduate with my ADN. Then my BSN will only take one year part time to finish, while I get my 1.5 years of ICU experience.
  5. by   ZooMommyRN
    I am finishing my ADN, I graduate in May, for the past 2 years in addition to pre-req's & gen ed requirements for this program I have also taken classes towards my MSN, in FL there are several major universities now offering RN-MSN curiculum for both NP & CRNA, you still take the BSN core but it's accelerated and you are not awarded the BSN but once you have the MSN the BSN isn't much of a factor
  6. by   MB37
    Zookeeper - I'm not contradicting you, there are a couple of schools in Florida that I haven't thoroughly looked into, but I haven't heard of any RN to CRNA programs anywhere that don't require a bachelor's degree. There are some that will accept an RN and a non-nursing bachelor's, but most want a BSN - that's one of the big reasons I enrolled in an accelerated BSN program and didn't consider CCs - I don't want to limit myself to the few CRNA schools that don't require a BSN for admission. What school offers the direct entry here? I've seen several schools that offer it for NP, but not CRNA...most programs are just too competitive.

    OP - if I understood your post, you'll have a semester off between finishing your prereqs and starting NS, right? As TampaGirl said, if your program has any classes they refer to as "co-reqs" get those out of the way if possible - my school doesn't have any, but some places you can get a few non-core nursing courses out of the way early (patho and pharm are common, or if you haven't taken all your required science courses finsih up now). If you've taken everything you can for the ADN program you're applying to, definitely get the classes you'll need for your BSN out of the way. You want to have a definite plan if you truly want to be a CRNA, because there are many steps you'll have to complete. Many CRNA schools will make you retake courses that are more than 5-10 years old (statistics and chemistry are two that are often mentioned) so you need to know exactly what courses to take when, and how much schoolwork you can handle while working in the ICU. You definitely need that 1-2 years minimum experience, but there's nothing wrong with getting that while finishing your BSN. Some CRNA schools will accept you while you still have a class or two left to take, so long as you have graduated with a bachelor's degree before you enter the CRNA program. Check out the pre-CRNA inquiry forum, especially the stickies at the top so you know the basics, and if you have any more detailed questions about CRNA that's probably a better place to get accurate answers.
  7. by   ZooMommyRN
    FGCU in Ft Myers has one and USF as well, I have to work for a minimum of 2 yrs as an RN before I can even apply to the bridge program at FGCU I also have to take a few more general ed classes as well and retake algebra to get rid of that pesky C, they specifically state tho that if you choose the direct entry and for any reason drop out you can not roll over to a BSN, you also have to petition for re-entry if were to drop a class for a 2nd time no matter what the reason, my sil had started out at this program that's how I found out about it however she will not be able to complete it so after the bridge I don't know much other than what is posted on the web http://www.fgcu.edu/chp/nursing/msn.html I don't have any other option than to ADN as the nearest BSN is almost 2 hours away, that is why I'm investing into what I will need for this MSN program as I want to go the NP/Educator route
    Last edit by ZooMommyRN on Oct 30, '07
  8. by   JustinTJ
    Hey Zoo, you want to do a ADN to BSN in Florida and then go work on your masters? The best path is FAU's program, everything is online. They also offer a ADN-MSN educator masters with a BSN and MSN awarded.

    http://nursing.fau.edu/newnursingsite/rnbsn/index.html
    Last edit by JustinTJ on Oct 30, '07
  9. by   Asherah
    Quote from MB37
    Zookeeper - I'm not contradicting you, there are a couple of schools in Florida that I haven't thoroughly looked into, but I haven't heard of any RN to CRNA programs anywhere that don't require a bachelor's degree. There are some that will accept an RN and a non-nursing bachelor's, but most want a BSN - that's one of the big reasons I enrolled in an accelerated BSN program and didn't consider CCs - I don't want to limit myself to the few CRNA schools that don't require a BSN for admission. What school offers the direct entry here? I've seen several schools that offer it for NP, but not CRNA...most programs are just too competitive.
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]Columbia University's ETP program (Entry to Practice) is a direct entry program that offers a Nurse Anesthesia specialty. You complete your BSN in 13 months, and then I believe that they require that you practice for at least one year in a critical care setting before coming back to complete the MSN portion in NA. The only advantage being that you have applied up front and do not have to do so again. This is an extremely impacted specialty and I believe they only admit 15 or so each year. You will find more info on their SON site.
  10. by   MB37
    Hmmm...I go to USF currently, and while I know NP students can go that route, I don't believe it applies to the CRNA program - according to the the AANA website (http://www.aana.com/BecomingCRNA.asp...nuID=6&id=1018) a bachelor's degree is required before one can enter a CRNA program. I checked USF's website, and they only describe a general RN to MS curriculum. It sounds like you're interested in NP, and there are several RN to NP programs around the country where you don't have to stop and earn a bachelor's' in between. Even the Columbia program described above awards students a BSN and then has them go work for a year. None of this applies to me though, I'm in an ABSN program now, and I need to get to studying.

close