active vs passive immunity

  1. 0
    what is the difference between an active and passive immunity?

    please explain it in a simple manner. i have a test tomorrow and i can't figure out the simple explanation for this.

    thanks so much!
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  4. 0
    Hm. Tell me what you understand to this point. Perhaps I understand it differently, but they seem to match their classification pretty clearly.

    Identify the ways a person can acquire an immunity, then go from there. I think that will be helpful, plus that's probably how they're going to test the material.
  5. 2
    There should be a chart or explaination in your text book. However here is my explaination. This chart is borrowed from wikipedia by the way

    Active immunity requires something to initiate the response and is produced from the persons own immune system. For example an infection or vaccination. It can take a few days to be effective. Passive immunity is immunity passed on from another with no action required. For example from the mother through the umbilical cord or nursing. It can also come through transfusion of fluids. It is effective immediately.
    This is just off the top of my head and it has been awhile since micro so always double check! Good luck to you! Relysh
    Farishta and ading like this.
  6. 0
    Just think about what the words active and passive mean.

    Active immunity requires your body to work to produce antibodies. For example, you get an infection and then your body produces antibodies to that infection or you receive immunizations, which induce your body to make antibodies for the immunization.

    Passive immunity does not require your body to work to produce antibodies (think immediate protection). For example, when a baby is born, the mothers activated T-cells/antibodies are passed along or activated antibodies are transferred directly to the host (ii.e. immune globulin).

    Passive immunity is short-lived/temporary, but active immunity, produced in the host itself, can be life-long.

    Hope this helps! Good luck on your test!
  7. 0
    Quote from NeecyBSN_RN
    Just think about what the words active and passive mean.

    Active immunity requires your body to work to produce antibodies. For example, you get an infection and then your body produces antibodies to that infection or you receive immunizations, which induce your body to make antibodies for the immunization.

    Passive immunity does not require your body to work to produce antibodies (think immediate protection). For example, when a baby is born, the mothers activated T-cells/antibodies are passed along or activated antibodies are transferred directly to the host (ii.e. immune globulin).

    Passive immunity is short-lived/temporary, but active immunity, produced in the host itself, can be life-long.

    Hope this helps! Good luck on your test!
    very well said. thank you <3


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