ACLS for non-nurses? - page 2

Just wondering if anyone here might know. I'm planning on doing BLS for Healthcare ASAP, but was wondering something. Is it possible to do the ACLS certification even if you aren't a medical... Read More

  1. by   chare
    Quote from Susie2310
    When I recently took AHA ACLS there was an online component (for which Continuing Education credits pertinent to one's professional license were awarded on passing the course) that required you to provide your professional licensure name and number when you initially registered for the class. The other component of the AHA ACLS class was class based and again asked for details of your professional license, and similarly awarded CE credits on passing the class.
    And your point?
  2. by   Susie2310
    Quote from chare
    And your point?
    Providing information. As each person on this forum is permitted to do, according to their view point and experience.

    You appear defensive.
  3. by   chare
    Quote from Susie2310
    Providing information. As each person on this forum is permitted to do, according to their view point and experience.

    You appear defensive.
    Not defensive, just asking for clarification, and apologize if that was how my post read. As many have written here, tone is often difficult, or impossible, to discern from written speech. I was asking for clarification as to how collecting licensure data to award CEUs implied that licensure as a health-care provider wad required. And while I applaud the OP's desire to expand her or his knowledge base and better be able to assist the team, I agree with those suggesting this can best be accomplished by providing high quality BLS.

    As for the original question, it was answered by Meriwhen; ACLS, as well as PALS, can be taken by anyone, if they can find a training center that would allow this. Based upon my experience, however, this is unlikely to happen, as most AHA training centers are hard pressed to provide enough seats for those required to take ACLS, or PALS.

    There are two points that I believe need to be addressed. First, ACLS is not a certification. At the end of the course, you receive a course completion card, attesting that, at that time you had demonstrated a minimum knowledge level and skills competence. Second, completion of ACLS does not "license" or "allow" anyone to perform any of the skills taught, although many facilities use possession of an ACLS card to allow certain nurses to perform certain ACLS interventions prior to the arrival of the physician code team leader.
  4. by   Irish_Mist
    Getting ACLS certified is a waste of time unless you are licensed (RN, Paramedic) to push IV medications. What is the point of learning algorithms and medications if you aren't able to utilize that knowledge and apply it to your current job?

    Stick to BLS. The best thing you can do if someone codes at your facility is provide good, quality chest compressions and utilize a BVM to provide rescue breaths until EMS arrives to take over.

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