Accelerated BSN and Signing Contracts - Too Early? - page 2

Our class has been commiserating about how we are all going into debt this year as we will be unable to work while in school, as the accelerated program is so demanding. Our dean is offering advice... Read More

  1. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    For example- I know a nurse who paid back a sign on bonus to leave a hospital. He then wanted to go to work at an outpatient cancer center he'd heard great things about. But- turns out the cancer center is owned by the same corporation who owns the hospital. Now, he can't get a job at the cancer center.
    Ah, so they keep a blacklist of sorts? Just because he opted out of the contract? Figures. Doesn't surprize me in the least.

    Same set up in my town. Lots of the outpatient clinics, etc. are owned by the same corporations under different names. The only good news is that I have lots of other options if I'm willing to commute.

    Nevertheless, I'll certainly be doing my homework on corporate ownership when the time comes. Seems like one burned bridge, intended or not, can cut off many destinations.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 25, '04
  2. by   colleen10
    Hi there,

    Some of my classmates and I were talking about this topic a few weeks ago.

    One of our local hospitals that we did a rotation at offered a sign on bonus for RN's and current nursing students. It was a $10,000 sign on bonus for I believe a 3 year committment. It was available for RN's who could start working immediately and also current nursing students that would go to work for them upon graduation in the next 1-2 years. The money was given at the time of signing the committment. So, if you were a student and signed up you would get the $10,000.00 today which you could use for tuition, books, uniforms, living expenses, whatever you wanted.

    One of my classmates was seriously considering doing this but decided not to. 3 years is a long time. What if you decide upon graduation that there is one particular area that you want to work in, but it's not available at the hospital that you signed your committment with? What if you decide to move to another city or that you don't like the people that you work with, or that your orientation is not as good as you would like?

    I have worked at enough places (not medical related) where I had to do whatever I was told and had few career options. One of the reasons that nursing is so interesting to me is that there are a ton of career options, I don't want to be tied down. I want to have the option to work in an area that really interests me, on a shift that works for me and at a facility or with people that I like and provide a supportive environment for a brand new nurse.

    I think if you are considering taking a sign on bonus talk with the nurses there and those have allready signed such a contract. One thing that my instructor told me though, is that different floors can be like night and day. Just because you happen to do your clinical on a particular floor with really great nurses that love students doesn't mean that the floor directly above is the same way, and vice versa.

    I think one of the really good pieces of advice I got on this topic from this board was from a nurse who said if you sign one of those contracts, take the check and put it in the cookie jar, above the refridgerator or in a safety deposit box. Don't cash it until you have worked at the facility a while and know that you definately want to stay there before you cash it in.
  3. by   SCmomof3
    Quote from colleen10
    I think one of the really good pieces of advice I got on this topic from this board was from a nurse who said if you sign one of those contracts, take the check and put it in the cookie jar, above the refridgerator or in a safety deposit box. Don't cash it until you have worked at the facility a while and know that you definately want to stay there before you cash it in.
    Good advice, but just remember that most checks are only good for 90 days. Cashing it into a savings account would be a better bet :nod:

    This thread has really made me think. Thanks for all the replies!
  4. by   jemommyRN
    There is an accelerated program where I am that i was thinking about enrolling. I even applied and got an interview (that reminds me, I have to call and cancel my interview). The catch is that a certain hospital will provide you with a 7500.00 stipend. (the program is ten months). You have to commit to working for this facility for 2 years. (still not too bad). But its all a set up. Before you enter the program, they tell you that you can work in any unit that they'll have openings in at the time of graduation (I wanted to work in the ICU) however, the accelerated program ONLY does clinical rotations in Med/Surg and when you get out (you're committed to this hospital and you have to work in Med/Surg because (1) your not qualified to go to any other unit and (2) they have openings in Med/Surg.) the whole purpose of the program (it is sponsored by this particular Hospital) is to bring in Med/Surg nurses. I only found this out through someone who is in the program. Otherwise, I would have been making the same mistake. They also say that "buying out" is not an option.
  5. by   Kena222
    I will be entering an accelerated bsn program in March of 2005. I wanted to get started with my funding as soon as possible. I know that I'm not going to be able to work, but how in the world am I just going to live off of a loan? How are you surviving now? Do you have to pay rent, groceries, bills. Do you know of anyone in your class that found another altenative to fund their schooling?

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