50 out of 100 Nursing students failed program - page 5

At my school 50 out of 100 nursing students failed thier first semester. They didnt make it. Geeze is nursing school that hard. I get really good grades but is it really that hard? These students... Read More

  1. by   jelly221,RN
    did you not have Anatomy as a pre-requisite??
  2. by   Batman24
    Quote from jelly221
    did you not have Anatomy as a pre-requisite??

    I do. We can't start the actual program until we copmplete a HHA or CNA course in addition to API. We also have to pass APII and Microbiology, but that can be done when in school.
  3. by   MarathonGirl
    Is it mostly the ADN programs that have such high drop-out rates? Are most universities and accelerated/2nd degree and direct entry masters programs the same?
  4. by   Freedom42
    I'm in an accelerated BSN program for second-degree students at a public university. I'm not aware of any classmates who've flunked out, though a few have had to repeat pharm. The university doesn't expel students who are unlikely to pass the NCLEX, either. The most recent pass rate for the school's first-time test takers, as published by the state BON, was 92 percent. That included accelerated and traditional students.

    Entering freshmen who've earned fewer than 18 credits may declare themselves nursing majors and don't have to apply directly to this program. That's after admission to the university, which requires the SAT, etc. The rest of us have to compete for whatever seats are left. There were about 800 applicants for 180 spots in the traditional and accelerated program. I don't know how many were offered seats.

    (Another pet peeve: The "we had 10,000 applicants but only took 100 students" chorus. Um, no. You might have had 10,000 applicants, but you haven't told me how many were given offers of admission; of those given offers, you expect only a fraction to enroll. If you don't tell me how many people are given offers, this claim doesn't add up to much. Consider that many students apply to more than one school as well. That changes the competition picture quite a bit, doesn't it?)
  5. by   FutureNavyNrs
    I'm in my fifth semester of a BSN program and while we started with 48, we will have 43 graduating. We have lost 8 and gained three - two from the class ahead of us and one that transferred from another campus. I was a straight A student going into this, and I have maintained mostly A's and B's throughout the program - except for second semester, where I had two C's. Nursing school is difficult, but it's not impossible.

    Our school also requires students to take the HESI test their last semester. If you don't pass with a certain score the first time, you have to take it again, at your expense. They say that if you don't pass the second time, you don't graduate, but I know someone that didn't pass it the second time last year and they graduated her after she took an NCLEX prep course. Apparently, though, since they've added the requirement for the HESI test, the NCLEX pass rate has gone up to 97%.
  6. by   Alternator81
    Quote from norcalRNstudent
    Sounds like your school doesn't care how many nurses they produce. No one has failed out of my program, and it is definitely not easy, the school is just supportive, and makes sure that we are well prepared before we can apply.
    I totally agree with this post. I took A&P at a local community college. To be placed on the waiting list for NS at that college, you had to have B's in Intro Bio and and average of a B in A&P I &II. They do not accept on GPA-- instead they wait for students to get the B averages and then put them on the waiting list. For a large number of the students it was the second time taking it to get a B. It was the third time taking the course for some students.

    I think it is terrible for the school to let students retake classes over and over, just to fail out. These schools should be responsible and tell them to look into other careers early on when they aren't hacking it. I know if I wasn't hacking it I rather be rejected from NS than to be kicked out the first semester!

    And it is no wonder when the OP said they were taking students with a 2.5 GPA. I think that a 2.5 is academic probation at my university!
  7. by   jelly221,RN
    Quote from Alternator81
    And it is no wonder when the OP said they were taking students with a 2.5 GPA. I think that a 2.5 is academic probation at my university!
    Yeah, it was academic probation at my university too. I hope those people have some major support in nursing school so they don't all get hypertension and die. (Although, then there would be more spaces for me... WHOA totally kidding.)
  8. by   giftedRN
    At my school the ADN program is very new. We all are passing so far and doing a great job. God bless our Instructors, they are very supportive and they have always tried to encourage us to do well. They are not so egotistic like some Instructors I know.
  9. by   ORRocksRN
    Quote from lizzyberry
    At my school 50 out of 100 nursing students failed thier first semester. They didnt make it. Geeze is nursing school that hard. I get really good grades but is it really that hard? These students must not be that dedicated. IL college...
    So WHAT do people out there DO when they fail out???? How do they proceed?? Do they give up the dream, apply elsewhere, start over, WHAT have been peoples expereinces?? How many end of finishing, and what path do they take? I'm extremely interesting in hearing what has been successful for people who REALLY want to be RNs???

    thanks!
  10. by   Dublin37
    Quote from Daytonite
    I think that is so frigging sad. To my way of thinking it is a testament to the poor administration of the nursing school. The people in charge of the nursing program are either not making good choices in student candidates for the nursing program, or the instructors within their nursing program suck. I wouldn't want to be the Dean of your school telling me that only 50% of the students made it through the first semester of their program. I'd have him/her in a corner firing some pretty pointed questions. He/she would be slinking off ASAP with a red face when I was done with him/her. What the heck is mentally wrong with the administration and instructors in the schools that do this?
    I could not agree w/you more! I left a school that was just like that. They took it as a compliment to fail more students, bragging on their NCLEX passing rate. What they didn't look at, was how many people from other programs that were much more humane, were passing the NCLEX at near the same rate! My first semester, 12 were failed. In the last semester, there was only 22 left of it's beginning 50. So sad and so pathetic. What's even worse, is that the ones who fail are so beaten down, that they give up entirely on nursing, even though, they really had the makings of some great nurses. Shame on them! (the school that is)!
  11. by   Dublin37
    Quote from traveler2bee
    So WHAT do people out there DO when they fail out???? How do they proceed?? Do they give up the dream, apply elsewhere, start over, WHAT have been peoples expereinces?? How many end of finishing, and what path do they take? I'm extremely interesting in hearing what has been successful for people who REALLY want to be RNs???

    thanks!
    [S]Sadly, most of them quit all together. I was able to talk one girl out of quitting completely, but switching schools like I did. A couple are trying to regroup, and then try LVN school first. Although i've heard that LVN school is just as difficult. At my old school it was not that the students did not try. Believe me, you had to put in 4-8 hours of study/work a day! The ones that failed had the nazi power hungry, bullying CI's. [/S]
  12. by   ProfRN4
    I think it is terrible for the school to let students retake classes over and over, just to fail out. These schools should be responsible and tell them to look into other careers early on when they aren't hacking it. I know if I wasn't hacking it I rather be rejected from NS than to be kicked out the first semester!
    Try telling that to the students who have failed out 'by only one point', and all that. It's easier said than done.

    There is so much I want to respond to over the past 7 pages, but it would be nearly impossible to address everyones simplistic attitude here, blaming the school, the instructors, the GPA's etc. There are soo many factors, but a huge portion of this revolves around the admissions process. At my school, faculty members serve on the admissions committee. It is quite an experience, let me tell you. The thousands of applicants with GPA's all over the place, nursing failures at other schools, repeated pre-req courses, students having tried to get into 2, 3 and 4 different programs, and extremely poor showing on the entrance exams. They want to know why they were not accepted and beg and plead for a chance. A chance for what, to fail? I know it sounds very harsh, but if we admit these people into the program, are we setting them up for failure? I know by and large, this is not necessarily who we are talking about here. But I think you need to look at the admissions process.

    Another major factor is that NURSING SCHOOL IS HARD!!! And many of todays nursing students are multi-taskers: wearing many hats, and barely having the time to be in class, let alone devote any extra time to studying. I see it first hand (and I know it is not everyone, I am generalizing here), but many many students underestimate the effort needed to succeed in the program.

    And yes, NCLEX passing rates are the way schools are measured. It is what it is, it will never change, and the state BONs can basically put us out of business if our failure rates are low. Whether yo agree with it or not, it is the most objective way to measure minimal competence in graduate nurses.
  13. by   4rom2bRN
    Wow! What school is this? My school has similar problems. I have an awful malicious instructor, right now. I've have great instructors prior to this one.

    Alot of my classmates are thinking about dropping out because of their grades. Honestly, its not their fault. In my case, it really is the instructors fault. I think a few of them are seeking for an attorney.

    What I am learning is that you must stick together for what is right. Listen to yourself and keep tabs of everything that is going on.

    I am greatly thankful for this site. They have taught me alot.

    I really would like to know what school this is. Is it in chicago? Mine is.


    Curious....

close