100% dosage calculations? - page 2

I was sitting here looking at my dosage calculations book(& wondering why I decided to go to nursing school:lol2:) &I started thinking. My school requires a 100% on your dosage calculation test and... Read More

  1. by   Daytonite
    well, surprise everyone! not only do most schools do this, but so do most employers! most acute hospitals won't let you begin your clinical work as new grads or new employees on the units you were hired for until you are able to pass a medication test that is administered to you by the nursing education department during your orientation period. different facilities have different requirements. some will give you a certain number of tries to attain a specific mark (such as 90 or 100%). some are patient and will work with you until you can pass the test. others will automatically terminate your employment if you can't pass the test after a specified number of tries. these tests not only include calculations, but the knowledge of normal dosages and side effects of certain key medications that are frequently used as well.

    medication errors are a big issue in practice today. medicare started tracking medication errors some years ago when they discovered the impact (in $$$) it was having on claims it had to pay out. you should all become aware of the institute for safe medication practices. it publishes a monthly newsletter that is free to nurses that gives the latest information and warnings on problem medications. you can get the link to receive this publication on the new allnurses forum that was set up regarding medications on this thread:
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f279/pro...ety-57768.html - promoting medication safety (now on the med savvy forum)
    it has been moved to a new forum that allnurses opened up recently called med savvy.
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f279/ - med savvy: promoting medication safety, medication alerts and understanding uses of new/old medications.
  2. by   wkucu1
    i know this is off subject, but i am a new member as of yesterday. i am a gettign ready to start my last semester for my bsn. i am wondering if anyone has any tips or helpful web sites for ecg/telemetry? any help would be great!!!

    merry christmas and happy holidays!!!
  3. by   Daytonite
    Quote from wkucu1
    i know this is off subject, but i am a new member as of yesterday. i am a gettign ready to start my last semester for my bsn. i am wondering if anyone has any tips or helpful web sites for ecg/telemetry? any help would be great!!!

    merry christmas and happy holidays!!!
    hi, wkucu1!

    first of all, to start your own thread and question all you need to do is go to the opening page for this forum (http://allnurses.com/forums/f50/) that has a listing of all the threads. you will see a button at the top left of the listings that says "new thread". by clicking on that button, anything you post will start a new thread. you will also be asked to make a title for this new thread. it's a good idea to make the title interesting so people will want to click on it and read the post.

    now, to get to your question. . .i will post some websites where you can get information on ekgs. you can also find some sites that are posted in the sticky threads in the critical care forums (http://allnurses.com/forums/f5/).

    http://www.gwc.maricopa.edu/class/bi...art/cardio.htm - cyberheart - tutorials for basic heart anatomy, physiology and ekgs from professor crimando at gateway community college in phoenix, az. has an interactive tutorial quiz.

    http://learn.sdstate.edu/nursing/ecg.htm - cardiac arrhythmias. a 66-page slide show presentation from dr. gloria craig at south dakota state university school of nursing. this is a very nice, simple explanation of the ekg with corresponding egk tracings. there are animations of the electrical conduction pathway for the various arrhythmias to help show what is going on to create the ekg tracing you see on paper. this is a very nice tutorial that addresses the normal sinus rhythm, sinus bradycardia and tachycardia, premature atrial contractions, atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter, atrial fibrillation, premature junctional contractions, junctional tachycardia, first, second and third degree blocks, premature ventricular contractions (pvcs), ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation and asystole.

    http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/v...g/ecg/ecg.html - a very basic one page explanation of what the ekg waveform is and a little explanation about each one of the peaks.

    http://rnbob.tripod.com/#section_3_c..._critical_care - section 3 of this website, nurse bob's micu/ccu survival guide, will help you identify all whole bunch of different rhythms and arrhythmias. nice clear rhythm strips are posted here. the site also covers a host of icu procedures, an extensive section on critical medications organized by categories, fluids and electrolytes, shock, and more!

    http://students.med.nyu.edu/erclub/ekgexpl0.html - er club. here is a short tutorial on how to read an ekg. click on the arrows at the bottom of each page to continue through the tutorial.

    http://www.madsci.com/manu/indexekg.htm - micro ekg manual from mad scientist software.

    http://www.rnceus.com/course_frame.a...&directory=ekg - ekg strip identification and evaluation - lots of information about taking and reading ekg strips

    http://www.skillstat.com/sixsecondecg.htm - six second ekg workbook online. lot of good information including pictures, pictures to label and quizzes.

    http://www.emedicinehealth.com/elect...article_em.htm - this is an 11-page patient education site from emedicinehealth that explains in very nice simple language what an ekg is and what it is all about. includes anatomy of the heart

    http://www.12leadecg.com/intro/ - introduction to 12-lead ecg, the art of interpretation online companion website for the book. you can view ekgs. there are also online flashcards you can view to quiz yourself on information about the electrical system of the heart. they are organized by chapters of the book.

    http://www.nursewise.com/courses/crit_cvdrugs_hour.htm - drugs used in cardiology care written by a nurse for nurses

    http://www.kauaicc.hawaii.edu/nursin...l/tutorial.htm ekg interpretation for healthcare professionals from kaua'i community college nursing school
    http://www.kauaicc.hawaii.edu/nursin...rial/lytes.htm - electrolyte and medications: effect on ekgs from kaua'i community college nursing school is just one section from the above site


    welcome to allnurses!
  4. by   moongirl
    yes, each semester. 100 percent and one retake. Sad to think that you could make it to final semester on week 12 and get the boot. We have been told it has only happened one time that someone did not pass. So far we have not lost anyone d/t math,( and I am going into final semester) so it can be done
  5. by   MegNeoNurse
    Well I've only completed 1 semester of 4 of the program... but so far our dosage calcs have been part of our exams. For clinical "lab days" we would have a test each time on certain procedures, and there would be atleast 3 dosage calc. problems and the tests woiuld be 15 points total. I wonder why our school doesn't do that (dosage calc. exams with 100% req.).... not complaining, but I just wonder.
  6. by   Jules A
    Quote from daytonite
    well, surprise everyone! not only do most schools do this, but so do most employers! most acute hospitals won't let you begin your clinical work as new grads or new employees on the units you were hired for until you are able to pass a medication test that is administered to you by the nursing education department during your orientation period. different facilities have different requirements. some will give you a certain number of tries to attain a specific mark (such as 90 or 100%). some are patient and will work with you until you can pass the test. others will automatically terminate your employment if you can't pass the test after a specified number of tries. these tests not only include calculations, but the knowledge of normal dosages and side effects of certain key medications that are frequently used as well.

    medication errors are a big issue in practice today. medicare started tracking medication errors some years ago when they discovered the impact (in $$$) it was having on claims it had to pay out. you should all become aware of the institute for safe medication practices. it publishes a monthly newsletter that is free to nurses that gives the latest information and warnings on problem medications. you can get the link to receive this publication on the new allnurses forum that was set up regarding medications on this thread:
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f279/pro...ety-57768.html - promoting medication safety (now on the med savvy forum)
    it has been moved to a new forum that allnurses opened up recently called med savvy.
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f279/ - med savvy: promoting medication safety, medication alerts and understanding uses of new/old medications.

    thanks for the links. i look forward to getting the newsletter.
    edited to add: that med safety site is incredible. i'm going to print out the back issues and make a notebook. they are small enough to really remember the information once a month. great, thanks again daytonite.
    Last edit by Jules A on Dec 25, '06
  7. by   TheCommuter
    My school required a 90 percent pass on the dosage calculations test, but I failed it when I scored 68 percent. Since this was a private program with lenient rules, I was permitted to continue on.
  8. by   Rosa2Little
    If you were the patient and your nurse had to mix and draw up your insulin, what % of the time would you expect his/her calculations to be correct?

    Just another way of thinking about it...
  9. by   BoonersmomRN
    We have a 95% benchmark. 20 questions you may get 1 wrong.
  10. by   moongirl
    Quote from TheCommuter
    My school required a 90 percent pass on the dosage calculations test, but I failed it when I scored 68 percent. Since this was a private program with lenient rules, I was permitted to continue on.
    wow, are you passing meds??:uhoh21:
  11. by   Coloradogrl
    Quote from Rosa2Little
    If you were the patient and your nurse had to mix and draw up your insulin, what % of the time would you expect his/her calculations to be correct?

    Just another way of thinking about it...
    That is what our teacher always says(well a little different) I am not against the 100% rate but I am scared about getting kicked out of the program if I dont I know I am in a accelrated program & we will be taking our 1st dosage calculations test about 2wks after X-mas break.....we only started December 11. I think I will be find but I am still nervous....I HATE math!
  12. by   S.T.A.C.E.Y
    ColoradoGrl....have you bought a dosage calculation book? I'm sure you could pick one up at the school bookstore or in the school library. Start at the beginning and just work your way through doing all the practice tests. By the time you get to the test you shouldn't have a problem since you've been doing 500 med calcs over christmas break!

    Our med test was a joke. At least half of it was: If 500mg of Drug X is ordered, and it comes in 250mg tablets, how many tabs to do you give? Or If it only comes in 1g tabs, how many do you give? Of 20 or 25 questions, only around 10 required any actual math skills......of course, I've always been good at math so most of the test was pretty easy.

    Definitely though, get a dosage calc book, and just work through it step by step.
  13. by   Coloradogrl
    Quote from S.T.A.C.E.Y
    ColoradoGrl....have you bought a dosage calculation book? I'm sure you could pick one up at the school bookstore or in the school library. Start at the beginning and just work your way through doing all the practice tests. By the time you get to the test you shouldn't have a problem since you've been doing 500 med calcs over christmas break!

    Our med test was a joke. At least half of it was: If 500mg of Drug X is ordered, and it comes in 250mg tablets, how many tabs to do you give? Or If it only comes in 1g tabs, how many do you give? Of 20 or 25 questions, only around 10 required any actual math skills......of course, I've always been good at math so most of the test was pretty easy.

    Definitely though, get a dosage calc book, and just work through it step by step.
    Ohhh I hope our test is like that

    We got a dosage calculation book along with our math book. It looks like a good book & have been using it but out teacher thinks the book isnt all that good & is taking crap about it all the time(that is the main reason I am worried!)
    Of course he is one of those people that ALWAYS think they have a better way of doing things

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