"You've never said you liked nursing." A vent. - page 3

by dudette10 9,847 Views | 53 Comments

Had a really tough shift the other day, and I brought it home. My husband asked me what was wrong, and I just rambled for 15 minutes. When I was done, he said to me, "You've never said you liked nursing." He's right. I've... Read More


  1. 11
    Quote from Anoetos
    And yet...

    ...if you say you're in it for the money and the security, you get piled on.
    Straight up... I'm in it for the money and the security.

    Sometimes I like it, mostly I tolerate it, and on occasion I despise it.

    I have the benefit of perspective from several career incarnations prior to becoming an ED nurse.

    It's my job... not my hobby and certainly not my calling nor life's mission... just my job.
  2. 3
    Although I love caring for patients and feel that in a perfect world, nursing would be my career of choice, it's hard--period. I have been known to "complain and rant" to a co-worker or two, even though I do enjoy caring for people. I have no doubt that a "negative or bad" attitude such as this affects patient care, but you learn as you become an experienced bedside nurse that it is hard with the current culture of healthcare in hospitals to always be 100% there and with a patient in terms of your attitude and your time. I think as nurses that we are all human and although we may try to not let issues such as short staffing, management, providers, technology, hospital culture, etc. interfere with care, it does-- even to those with the best intentions. It truly takes a person of steel to resist persistent and numerous difficulties/roadblocks at work. I have worked with nurses who do, but it is only a few.
    joanna73, anotherone, and opossum like this.
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    It pays the bills. And no, I don't like it.
    When my kids were younger and in school, I'd run into old teachers who were just mean. You could tell they didn't even like kids anymore. They just stayed teachers because it paid well and they didn't know how to do anything else.
    That's me, only substitute nurse for teacher.
    anotherone and Mulan like this.
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    [QUOTE=debfeathers;7080309]But isn't is a shame that almost every nurse you talk with, no matter where they are from or what area they are working the story is the same. I have worked 40 years and retired, but nothings changed. Why is that? My theroy. Too many Chief Nurses playing the good ole boy game to keep themselves safe at the top, and selling the staff down the river. Thoughts?[/QUOTE

    Tell it like it is!
    anotherone likes this.
  5. 11
    Thanks for the support guys. I felt better after my mini-rant. My husband is supportive, but he can only understand so much. You guys understand everything.

    To the nursing student upstream: I understand where you are coming from when you have spent much time on the other side of the rail or have a loved one who is. I can honestly say that while I don't love my JOB, I do like my patients. Those who *seem* to you that they don't like their jobs are being pulled in 20 different directions at once! It's stressful to work under those conditions.

    On one crazy shift, I had one stable patient, getting ready to go to rehab in a day or so, who had the last of his many antibiotics to be hung, the last of his TPN going, and continued post-op pain meds. He called my phone to tell me it was time for his pain meds, and I went to his room. He has been hospitalized a lot, was one of the nicest patients ever, and he apologized about calling my phone because he knows "it rings off the hook when you're in here and all the nurses are so busy." I turned to him and said, "You're the reason we are here. Don't apologize."

    So, yes, you can hate your job but like and respect the people you are there to do the job for. That's the reason many of us went into nursing and that is WHY we don't like our jobs...because we can't be the nurses we want to be under these conditions! I am going to say something that I promised myself I would never say on this board, but it is a promise now broken in this sentence: You'll understand when you become a working nurse.
    feltshapes, gonzo1, mustlovepoodles, and 8 others like this.
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    I have been Nursing for 29 years. I feel the key is being organized. Today with these nursing programs, and how they teach the students, its like they are running around all over the place or something. The students these days are just taught differently. I am old school RN. I don't know. I just don't see what the problem is when you document once a shift at many facilities, and its all check marks, using a computer..I mean. Scanning an arm bracelet. Its not like back in the day when you had to hand chart every 2-4 hrs, chart prn's, hand copy MAR's....etc etc...I just don't get it
    Marshall1 likes this.
  7. 2
    Quote from RN In FL
    I have been Nursing for 29 years. I feel the key is being organized. Today with these nursing programs, and how they teach the students, its like they are running around all over the place or something. The students these days are just taught differently. I am old school RN. I don't know. I just don't see what the problem is when you document once a shift at many facilities, and its all check marks, using a computer..I mean. Scanning an arm bracelet. Its not like back in the day when you had to hand chart every 2-4 hrs, chart prn's, hand copy MAR's....etc etc...I just don't get it
    Maybe things have changed in the 8 years since you worked at the bedside.
    Ayvah and Testa Rosa, RN like this.
  8. 0
    I had an opportunity to return to the hospital setting after being away for over a year..instead I have opted for a part time HH job. If I could find a PRN position in a hospital I might consider it - but FT? No. For a variety of reasons, not just how much nursing has changed or 12 hr shifts, I would like to move in a direction outside of nursing but frankly, I personally cannot find any jobs that with having a degree in nursing only will even consider me. I will be completing my M.S. in 2013 (not MSN) and will go from there. I'm fortunate I get benefits through my spouse so I have some flexibility there.
    As far as liking nursing..I use to..but never saw it as my "calling" - and now, I see it as a means to a paycheck. Sad but true.
  9. 3
    Quote from PalmHarborMom
    I understand that nursing is not cut out for everyone. Having spent a great deal of time in hospitals with my husband over the last few years, nurses are fooling themselves of they think that patients can not tell that they are there just for the money or if they hate their job. We have had many nurses at hospitals that obviously were not there for the patients. Yes, they at times still did what was required but it was obvious that the hospital was not where they wanted to be. We have fired MANY home health nurses. It is bad enough to put up with someone who doesn't want to be there in the hospital but I will not put up with it in my own home. I will say that the those nurses are the ones that inspired me to go to nursing school. Patients deserve to have a nurse that wants to be there. My best suggestion for anyone if they do not like their job.... Make the best of it. Not everyone has the dream job but we can all make a plan to get where we want to be. That may mean a career change, getting more education or just a different location. The choice is yours. Choice is the important word here. It is your choice to stay in the healthcare industry, so try to look for the good (no matter how small). Finding things to be thankful for makes all the difference in a person's ability to be content with where they are in life.And before I hear about it.... Yes, I am a nursing student. BUT I have a tremendous amount of first-hand experience of the negative impact that healthcare workers that hate their job has on the patients.
    I am as good a nurse as any that got a calling or other nonsence. I do my job with a smile! drinks and cheers for the visitors. hell, i will even fluff their pillows and have! my manager has gotten cards thanking me and stating how glad pt / visitor was that i was the nurse. i picked nursing for the job security , pay and ease of finding a job(was very difficult year i graduated in).
  10. 3
    HA!....all that i typed was not from 8 yrs ago....that was from like 20 yrs ago...LOLOL I was just saying, seems like comparing "back then" to now, seems like it would be different. Well I guess for me it would be, considering what I had to do "back then". Besides working days, and passing 2 meals, baths, my own iv's, 5-6 patients, NO CNA, and outta there in 8hrs. didn't have 12 shifts then. and got ragged at for OT. hehe. I know its a new culture. started nursing at 22, now 49 Don't fuss at me to bad....lol


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