Is Your Name Important? - page 9

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

For starters, I will reveal that I am an African-American female with a very common anglicized first and last name. I am also friendly with a small handful of nurse managers, staff development personnel, and others who have at... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    I would argue that the African-American parents who give their children overtly "ethnic" names like Quandella or Lakeesha ARE the one's who are being conformist.
    I disagree, Brandon. I would say that these names are totally nonconformist.
  2. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I disagree, Brandon. I would say that these names are totally nonconformist.
    No. They're overtly AA ethnic sounding. So, they "conform" to an AA culture.
  3. 0
    Quote from dansamy
    No. They're overtly AA ethnic sounding. So, they "conform" to an AA culture.
    There's not a single AA culture. Rather, there are multiple AA subcultures in the US.

    I'm an AA with a plain, 'mainstream'-sounding name (think of something similar to Carrie, Kelly or Lindsay). Since my name is not overtly black-sounding, would you say that it does not conform to a so-called AA culture?
  4. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    There's not a single AA culture. Rather, there are multiple AA subcultures in the US.

    I'm an AA with a plain, 'mainstream'-sounding name (think of something similar to Carrie, Kelly or Lindsay). Since my name is not overtly black-sounding, would you say that it does not conform to a so-called AA culture?
    Now I'm confused, Commuter. Aren't we saying the same thing? That, for example, your parents were being actually being non-conformist by giving you a relatively neutral name, as opposed to "conforming" to the AA norm of a distinctly "black" name?
  5. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    There's not a single AA culture. Rather, there are multiple AA subcultures in the US.

    I'm an AA with a plain, 'mainstream'-sounding name (think of something similar to Carrie, Kelly or Lindsay). Since my name is not overtly black-sounding, would you say that it does not conform to a so-called AA culture?
    I guess my point is that to many white people, those names are not mainstream, white names. They immediately stand out as ethnic minority. Perception. The perception is that they conform to AA culture because they are AA sounding names.


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