Is Your Name Important? - page 8

by TheCommuter Senior Moderator | 15,463 Views | 84 Comments

For starters, I will reveal that I am an African-American female with a very common anglicized first and last name. I am also friendly with a small handful of nurse managers, staff development personnel, and others who have at... Read More


  1. 0
    Excellent topic! I think some nicknames can backfire in adulthood.

    A friend I know was named Danny at birth. It was fine when he was young, but as a 6'4" police officer he wishes he had been named Daniel. So he goes by Dan which defeated his parents purpose of using the nickname to begin with.

    Another friend was named Michael at birth. All through school he was called Mike. When he got out into the work world he was known as Mike, until a few co-workers began calling him Mikey which he hated and thought was very juvenile. A very wise person in Mike's office said that he should go back to Michael in his professional life because the shortened version of Michael is Mike, while the shortened version of Mike is Mikey. And we all know how people like to simply shorten formal names. So now he goes by Michael, but I call him George because that is how I first met him.

    And so challenging honoring our children with their names.

    A mom in my community named her daughter "Abcde". Oh, I think HR people will stand on their heads trying to figure that one out. I will cut through the suspense, it's pronounced Ab-ce-dee.
  2. 0
    Very interesting thread idea Commuter.

    So far my name hasn't come up and I was named in the 50's.

    We gave our daughter her great-grandmother's first name as a middle name - it is very old-fashioned (Leona) but this lady was a sweet and gentle soul who prayed for a redheaded great-granddaughter and got one - our daughter! My daughter's first name is one I read in a book and had never heard of before but for some reason became wildly popular and so she shortened it to a nickname.

    Because we don't know the exact name one poster wants to use for her child, I don't think it is fair to just say no. I do agree that some of the more cutsy names like "Candie" are hard to live down (a good friend's name).

    Regarding ethnic names - a white rural hardworking family locally named their daughter Tashina. She gets a lot of comments. A biracial young man was given the name "Shidon" which sounds like a cuss word when you say it so he get a lot of teasing about that as school. I don't understand doing that to a kid.

    I'm not a fan of uniquely spelled names. There are a lot of Nevaeh's around here.
  3. 0
    Quote from OrionQuiltsRN
    Excellent topic! I think some nicknames can backfire in adulthood.

    A friend I know was named Danny at birth. It was fine when he was young, but as a 6'4" police officer he wishes he had been named Daniel. So he goes by Dan which defeated his parents purpose of using the nickname to begin with.

    Another friend was named Michael at birth. All through school he was called Mike. When he got out into the work world he was known as Mike, until a few co-workers began calling him Mikey which he hated and thought was very juvenile. A very wise person in Mike's office said that he should go back to Michael in his professional life because the shortened version of Michael is Mike, while the shortened version of Mike is Mikey. And we all know how people like to simply shorten formal names. So now he goes by Michael, but I call him George because that is how I first met him.

    And so challenging honoring our children with their names.

    A mom in my community named her daughter "Abcde". Oh, I think HR people will stand on their heads trying to figure that one out. I will cut through the suspense, it's pronounced Ab-ce-dee.
    My husband's middle name is Scott and that's what his parents decided to call him since he has red hair. He grew up as Scotty and the whole community knows him as that and still calls him that. He doesn't mind.

    Our son is Daniel and we call him Danny after my husband's best friend, who is called Danny by everyone except his wife, who hates the name Danny. But her husband is fine with it and that's what we call him.

    You are damned if you do, and damned if you don't.
  4. 0
    I've got a very Irish first middle and last name, pasty white with red hair and green eyes. Sometimes you do fit the stereotypes!!!
  5. 0
    I have a VERY ethnic first and last name, it's actually Nigerian. Although the way myfirst name looks and is pronounced, people always ask if it's french haha. But I have never gotten the impression that my name has stopped me from getting any job. But I wouldn't be surprised if someone passed me over because they didn't like African foreigners. (But I have heard that I speak very articulate and clear with no accent...me and my name can confuse people)
  6. 0
    There were always lots of Wendys in the fifties, around the time Peter Pan opened on Broadway. I have a boomer name, but it's spelled weirdly and has been no end of trouble for me all my life.

    My initials (first, middle) are the same as my parents' first name initials Stupid young parents, thought it was romantic no doubt. All my younger siblings are named after somebody in the family, wish I was.

    On the bright side, it's really easy to change your name. If there's no fraud involved, you can just fill out a notarized form and file it with the county courthouse. Then you spend a year notifying your credit card companies, your mortgage, the voter registration, the library card, your licenses, the banks... but when it's done, you are your own self. I have a dear friend who did that and I am envious.
  7. 0
    This is a very interesting topic. I also have a very ethnic first name but a very common last name. I don't think it has stopped me from getting a job. At least, I hope not.
  8. 0
    I agree! I had been looking for a job for one month to the day after I NCLEX. I had previous healthcare experiencel nearly fiteen years worth and still; no calls. My husband and my father suggested that my name on the top of my resume was causing the problem. I am an African American female named Sharnette. It is pronounced just like it looks (Shar-net). I ended up going to a job fair to inquire about a position that I had pereviously applied to online and got a job offer on the spot. So I do think that race, and your name can help or hurt you. I kept thinking that if I could just get in front of someone; I could at least get a second interview. The online systems ask for your gender as well as race. Usually the race is optional. I don't even think that most people will get past the recruiter if they go off names alone. If they can't pronounce it or it is isn't gender specific. (Like perviously stated)
  9. 1
    I wonder if parents realize that, by giving their children currently trendy names like "Dakota" or "Madison" they're ensuring that said children will eventually have streotypical "old people" names.

    "Agatha" and "Dorothy" were trendy, hip names once upon a time, too.
    monkeybug likes this.
  10. 1
    Quote from yshell12
    The responses on this thread make me sick. I'm AA w/ kids that have neutral names but folks who complain about the uniqueness of a name are those who believe in conformity. We were made to be individuals! Ridiculous!
    I would argue that the African-American parents who give their children overtly "ethnic" names like Quandella or Lakeesha ARE the one's who are being conformist.
    monkeybug likes this.


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