Is Your Name Important? - page 4

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

13,448 Unique Views | 84 Comments

For starters, I will reveal that I am an African-American female with a very common anglicized first and last name. I am also friendly with a small handful of nurse managers, staff development personnel, and others who have at... Read More


  1. 0
    Do you mean name your child "Becca" instead of the more traditional "Rebecca"? Aside from naming someone "Chris" instead of Christopher, Christian, Christine, etc. (which could be confusing), I would think it's a non issue. Unless of course you wanted to name your child "Bbeckhahx'" instead of Becca. I think nontraditional "unique" spellings are fallling out of favor.

    Even Meg or Maggie (instead of Marguerite, Meghan, Margaret,etc.). Think of John which in theory is a shortened form of Jonathan now is used commonly as a name.
  2. 3
    Quote from Good Morning, Gil
    Okay, on the name note: I need objective advice, which I know friends and family won't give me since they just want to be supportive of a name I picked.

    Is it okay to name your child what would normally be a nick-name? I'm not pregnant yet, but I do have my heart set on a particular name since it's a name in the family, and I could always be sentimental and remember this person after she's long gone , but I don't like her full name, so I wanted to name my future daughter the nick-name version of it. I really really like it...but would she not be taken seriously? One of my friends has a nick name as her formal name, and it works well.

    Great thread by the way.
    I wouldn't. I have a nickname as my first name, and, like I said earlier, I hate not having a grown up name. Maybe take the nickname, shortened version, and create a different longer/formal name to go with it.
  3. 0
    This is a very interesting read. I used to have a latin last name that I took from my first husband. Now I have a very common american last name, from my second husband.
    I couldn't wait to get my name changed due to people misprouncing my 1st married name. Often people would assume I was from another country or spoke spanish due to last name of my first husband. He is from latino and I'm not.
    My second husband and are the same race so there are no consequences for my current name.
  4. 0
    I worked really hard on my son's name. He has a long, formal name with 2 options for shortened names. The thing that I didn't count on is that all three of his names can be used for a first or last name. So, when people read off his name, they think his last name is his first name. I had no idea this would be happening because I didn't realize how popular our last name is for a boys first name. Ugh!!!!!
  5. 0
    Yes, a name can help or hurt you.

    My last name makes people think I am a race that I am not. It's funny what people say :-0

    Before I got married recently I did not get any call backs for a job interview. When I changed my last name I got call backs rather quickly and I was a new grad at the time. My first name is a typical name that can go any way, but my last name is not typical for my race at all.
  6. 2
    Quote from Good Morning, Gil
    Okay, on the name note: I need objective advice, which I know friends and family won't give me since they just want to be supportive of a name I picked.

    Is it okay to name your child what would normally be a nick-name? I'm not pregnant yet, but I do have my heart set on a particular name since it's a name in the family, and I could always be sentimental and remember this person after she's long gone , but I don't like her full name, so I wanted to name my future daughter the nick-name version of it. I really really like it...but would she not be taken seriously? One of my friends has a nick name as her formal name, and it works well.

    Great thread by the way.
    My husbands given name is Bobby, he HATES it, would much rather have a proper name like Robert. He hated having a nickname for a name.
  7. 0
    I have a, what I consider, very uncommon first name. I've met like 1-2 people in my life with my name. I like it because it's not popular but it is not completely out there fringe like. It's a classic French name. While all the popular names growing up were things like Amanda, Brittany, Emily, Nicole, Jessica (goodness, the Jessicas in my generation, my HS graduating class of 400+ had about 20+ Jessicas), Jennifer, Ashley, Katie (any of the names with a nickname Katie), Rachel/Rachael, and so on... I was the ONLY one. When I was very young, I wished I had a name with a nickname like 'Jess' or 'Britt' - but by the time I got to high school, I was thankful for my name.

    If and when I ever have a family of my own they will be given names that are not so unique as to be absurd. I'm not in a relationship right now, and I consider myself young... The only problem I get with my name is pronunciation, people always want to give my name a more French sounding pronunciation. My brother shares my father's first name but has my paternal grandfather's first name as (my brother's) middle name. So that's been a little difficult. But I am thankful that my parents chose rather 'easy' names. Not so common that we were one of 5+ in our classes in school but not overly difficult either. Growing up, I always thought about how much I loved my paternal great grandma's name (Charlotte), never really expected it to be so popular like it is now. Who knows, by the time I have a kids it might not be so popular . I also am really partial to my maternal grandmother's name. I recently looked my grandmother's name up, it's not even in the top 1000 most popular names according to the SSA. I like it, but it might be considered too rare, but it would be a family name.

    I'm friends with a number of people who have already had kids. Some of their kids' names, I would never say it to their faces, but I wonder what the world is gonna be like for some of them... Except, some of these names and spellings I'm seeing may be 'the' trend for this new generation. I don't know. Compared to some of the things I'm seeing friends considering on Facebook for their kids - I think the 'lyn' names might be totally normal when compared to the others. Some of the 'lyn' names are nicer than others though...I will say that. One of my friends' kids' names - it's a popular name, except it's spelled wrong just so it's "not as popular" ... The response I think of is 'Except when you say either version - they sound the same...so I don't see how it matters but if it makes you happy okay, but I will say your kid will spend their entire lives explaining how to spell their name...'

    Someone a while back mentioned surnames with Eastern European vs Western European names. I'm blessed in many ways. I am able to identify with the culture and heritage my mom's family has (Slavic/Polish/Hungarian). But my dad has a surname that is either Irish or an Anglicized translation of an old Jewish surname. Makes it a lot easier for my brother and I. Because my father's surname is so Anglicized/Americanized, it makes it very easy for us. My mother's maiden name is Polish, and was surely difficult to learn to spell as a child. See the thing is though, when it came to immigrating to the US - many cultural/ethnic groups settled in similar areas. If I had my mom's maiden name where she grew up, nobody would think anything of it (there's a lot of similar names in that area). But where my mom and dad lived when I was a child, it would stand out very obviously.
  8. 1
    Very interesting read. Before pursuing nursing school I actually studied along these lines in university (linguistics and sociology) and sadly yes, name-biasing is quite real. There have been multiple studies on this topic.

    It's interesting to consider the geographical make up of the demographics as well. In a multi-cultural city, applicants with "foreign" names would likely be "accepted" more readily as compared to a less diverse town or city. I know for a fact at my last job, the company I worked for actually had a mandate to hire people who represent the demographic in the community. The area I worked in was a suburb of a large metropolitan city which contained a large Asian population (Indian, Chinese etc) and as a result the company would hire people of those backgrounds. Was the company scanning resumes and automatically rejecting every "Bill Smith" that came through in order to fill the demographic quota? Who knows.

    For me personally, I have a popular North American name but my last name is very eastern European sounding. I wonder if I've ever been passed over for interviews when the hiring manager scans over my name thinking, "Well I bet she can't speak English".

    In terms of the generational comment, while this can be true, I also think age-bias can exist based on viewing an applications educational background on a resume. Employes might choose to pass over someone's resume if they graduated 3 years ago as opposed to 13 years ago, and that decision could be made based on the idea that the applicant who graduated 3 years ago is less emotionally mature that the applicant who graduated 13 years ago. Graduating year doesn't necessarily indicate one's age automatically however.
    echoRNC711 likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from Good Morning, Gil
    Okay, on the name note: I need objective advice, which I know friends and family won't give me since they just want to be supportive of a name I picked.

    Is it okay to name your child what would normally be a nick-name? I'm not pregnant yet, but I do have my heart set on a particular name since it's a name in the family, and I could always be sentimental and remember this person after she's long gone , but I don't like her full name, so I wanted to name my future daughter the nick-name version of it. I really really like it...but would she not be taken seriously? One of my friends has a nick name as her formal name, and it works well.

    Great thread by the way.
    I think so. Like Katie is a nickname for Katherine, but also a name in it's own right. Same with Harry (pet form of Henry) and Charlie. I don't see the problem. Now, if you're thinking of Honey or Darling or Bear, then no
  10. 1
    HI. I am from Croatia, I am Tanja and we dont have such problems... We have some another problems... Politicals, and economys.My name is from Russia, and I have never been there, but it is very big problem, our parents give us names and name dont say that we are clever or not, good or bad...
    sharpeimom likes this.


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