You Know You're an Old(er) Nurse If . . . - page 3

You know you're an older nurse if: 1. You remember working with nurses who wore caps. :nurse: 2. You remember nurses (and doctors) sitting at the nurses station drinking coffee and smoking... Read More

  1. by   santhony44
    Quote from Dixielee

    No gloves because it would cause a patient to have a poor body image if you wore them to clean them up.
    We must have had the same nursing school instructors! I remember that well. If you wear gloves, the patients will think that you think they're "dirty." :smilecoffeecup:
  2. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from santhony44
    We must have had the same nursing school instructors! I remember that well. If you wear gloves, the patients will think that you think they're "dirty." :smilecoffeecup:

    Turns out, they are dirty, lol.
  3. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from santhony44
    You burned yourself testing for glucose. You put urine in a glass test tube and dropped a tablet in. It fizzed and changed colors, getting very hot in the process.
    Yes, I remember all of these things! Believe it or not a doctor ordered this on a patient a year or so ago. AC and HS with SSI. I don't remember now what the urine glocose test was called?

    I remember around 1975 the newest technology, a fetal monitor.

    Patients name and their doctor was posted on the outside of their door.

    The glass IV bottles were flat on the top. The pt would go to the BR, put the bottle upside on the floor, then you had a bottle full of blood!
    How many bottles crashed to the floor and shattered all over the place!

    No IV pumps, only roller-clamps, confused pt's would play with the clamp.
    Hang a 1000cc bottle and check back in 30 minutes and bottle almost empty.

    Report included LTC.
  4. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Thanks guys for reminding me that I'm old


    I do remember working nights in this nursing home as a CNA, the two of us sitting at the nursing station blowing smoke as a patient stood there with a question... we thought nothing of it!

    And the caps, they were on the way "out", but I was so proud to have earned mine I wore it anyway, for a time...
  5. by   rach_nc_03
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Anyone remember using Mylanta or Maloxx to "paint" the skin of a person with an adhesive allergy, so as to be able to use the offending adhesive on the allergic pt without getting a reaction?
    whoa! Does the maalox/tape allergy thing work? I only ask because I've been stuck with no paper tape in the house and needed to use some plastic tape on myself. I have a horrid rash after (small town, no 24 hour stores).

    These are fascinating, btw! I often heard seasoned nurses on the floor refer to some of these things and had no idea what they were talking about- and it took me six months as a CNA to figure out what the bedpan hopper was (not in use, obviously, but still in every soiled linen room in the hospital).
  6. by   OC_An Khe
    There weren't codes as cpr hadn't been approved yet.
    Hoppers for the bed pans.
    Resharpening hypodermic needles.
    Taking a blood pressure was the MDs responsibility not the nurses (forget about any type of physical assessment).
    Weeks on end in traction for limb fractures.
    Gloves re sterilezed for multiple uses.
  7. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from rach_nc_03
    whoa! Does the maalox/tape allergy thing work? I only ask because I've been stuck with no paper tape in the house and needed to use some plastic tape on myself. I have a horrid rash after (small town, no 24 hour stores).

    These are fascinating, btw! I often heard seasoned nurses on the floor refer to some of these things and had no idea what they were talking about- and it took me six months as a CNA to figure out what the bedpan hopper was (not in use, obviously, but still in every soiled linen room in the hospital).
    Yes, the Mylanta/Maalox thing works pretty well. When I worked hospice, we had a few pt's who reacted to the adhesive on fentanyl patches. With these pts, we'd use Mylanta to lightly coat the skin, let it dry, then apply the patches. This also works to sooth pt's skin that is excoriated around a G-tube site. I've worked in a few jobs where the nurses had lots of autonomy. With the way everything is all policy and procedure now, any nurse using these tricks nowadays would probably get in trouble.
  8. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from ocankhe
    There weren't codes as cpr hadn't been approved yet.
    Hoppers for the bed pans.
    Resharpening hypodermic needles.
    Taking a blood pressure was the MDs responsibility not the nurses (forget about any type of physical assessment).
    Weeks on end in traction for limb fractures.
    Gloves re sterilezed for multiple uses.
    In the days when docs had to do BPs and assessments, were the docs around a lot more? I rarely ever see a doc in my area of nursing.
  9. by   santhony44
    Stryker frames! Does anyone else remember Stryker frames? I had a fall a few years ago and refused to let anyone move me without a c-collar and logrolling. I told people later that I lay there and all I could think of was being on a Stryker frame. Everyone looked at me like I was nuts. Totally clueless to what I was talking about!

    I don't go back this far myself, but I had a nursing professor who talked about "cooking" morphine tablets with water in a spoon and drawing it up for injection.
  10. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from santhony44
    ....I don't go back this far myself, but I had a nursing professor who talked about "cooking" morphine tablets with water in a spoon and drawing it up for injection.
    I saw some nurses' morphine cooking apparatises (sp) in a nursing museum. It's weird that nurses used to cook MSO4 in a spoon over a flame then draw it into a syringe- the same way drug addicts do it!
  11. by   muffie
    i started in 1987
    we [tried] to measure cvp
    something like putting a ruler beside the pt's neck
    i can't remember

    oh the good ole days

    how many times a day would we remake a bed[no fitted sheets]
    side of bed facing the door had to have bedspread longer than the sheet
    so no sheet was showing [whatever]

    thank god for progress and change

    thanks for the walk down memory lane
  12. by   santhony44
    Quote from muffie
    how many times a day would we remake a bed[no fitted sheets]
    side of bed facing the door had to have bedspread longer than the sheet
    so no sheet was showing [whatever]
    Don't forget the toe pleat! And the open end of the pillowcase faces away from the door.
  13. by   ebony2
    surgical preps by nurses prior to surgery
    providing care to same peds patiens each year while parents went on vacation
    inpatient stays for routine diagnostic testing (usally 3-5 day stay)
    restraints on the units for patients with behavioral problems
    high hot and soapy enema's
    isolation up the whazoo(enteric.contact,respiratory,reverse)
    fingerstick accidents not a problem
    mixing your own IV additives
    dress codes in some form or fashion
    during some dressing changes tapping patients buttocks to the side rail for that previously mentioned heat lamp treatment
    informaition on a need to know basis was everyone knew everything
    aluminum paste for dressing changes
    bolus tube feedings
    DRG's
    team approach nursing
    police or ambulance providing transportation to work in bad weather conditions

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