You Know You're an Old(er) Nurse If . . . - page 10

You know you're an older nurse if: 1. You remember working with nurses who wore caps. :nurse: 2. You remember nurses (and doctors) sitting at the nurses station drinking coffee and smoking... Read More

  1. by   asher315
    I worked in OB and we used to save the "clean" placentas, freeze them and sell them to a cosmetic company. The mec ones either went to path or down the placenta grinder.

    After reading all of these, I think its safe to say that we're not getting older but improving with age.
  2. by   muffie
    you get out of bed for a day shift and your body already hurts !
  3. by   huskersfan
    I remember the RN spilling mercury on the desk and these little beads of it rolling around everywhere. We had to gather up the mercury and then it all stayed together and she pushed it back into the bottle. I think she was putting the mercury in a dobhoff tube for weight. I was watching her do this and I think the mercury got on her wedding band and ate the gold off of her ring.. Does this sound correct? This was alot of years ago. I was an LPN so was just watching her.
  4. by   nursesaideBen
    Quote from krisssy
    I thought I was an older nurse (59) until I read The Sinai Nurse (1852-2000). I couldn't believe what nursing was like in the 1800's. Leeches used to stop bleeds, third year diploma school nurses being the head nurse with a second year student being the asst. head nurse, being taught by doctors because there were hardly any graduate nurses, and young nurses losing their lives from flu epidemics. Most of your schooling was working in the hospital, and that was it. I now feel so much younger.
    We had a pt back in October that we had to apply leeches to a wound on her face, the best part is that the nurses kept the jar of leeches in the refrigerator in the break room watch what you grab!
  5. by   santhony44
    Quote from huskersfan
    I remember the RN spilling mercury on the desk and these little beads of it rolling around everywhere. We had to gather up the mercury and then it all stayed together and she pushed it back into the bottle. I think she was putting the mercury in a dobhoff tube for weight. I was watching her do this and I think the mercury got on her wedding band and ate the gold off of her ring.. Does this sound correct? This was alot of years ago. I was an LPN so was just watching her.
    The mercury just temporarily coated the ring turning it "silver." That happened to me once when I was cleaning up a broken glass thermometer.

    I don't remember what we did with it but nobody was particularly concerned about the mercury.

    I also remember playing with a bottle of mercury in chemistry lab in high school.

    From now on, when I forget things, I'm going to blame it on the mercury!
  6. by   fetch33
    Quote from nursesaideBen
    We had a pt back in October that we had to apply leeches to a wound on her face, the best part is that the nurses kept the jar of leeches in the refrigerator in the break room watch what you grab!

    I work an ortho unit where we get finger replants all the time. Our leeches are kept in the pharmacy. I have become quite good at leech wrangling. There is nothing like a 4 finger revasc with continuous leeches to improve your leech handling skills.
  7. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from kriso
    I remember using an 18 ga needle to poke a hole in something (nifepidine?) in order to administer the liquid sublingually to get a BP down fast.

    someone else mentioned Theophylline drips.

    rolling meds carts that you used a pack mule to load up so you would have everything you could possibly think of before starting on your long journey down the hall.

    scalp needles for IVs in peds with a paper cups taped to their heads- they looked like they were going to a birthday celebration with their little party hats on.

    night shift writing in red and day shift in black.

    HHH enemas

    when AIDS patients became emaciated and died a horrible undignified death

    hearing the pharmacy tech over the PA system saying "Narcotic keys to the desk, please. Narcotic keys to the desk" Guess he needed to reload the metal double lock box.

    Peri-lights for episiotomies that looked like something from outer space

    whiskey at the nurses station to prevent DTs

    flushing EVERY peripheral line "saline lock" with heparin- I still call them heplocks!

    the metal contraption that you used to screw the syringe into place in order to administer the med- can't think of the name of it.

    AZT listed in my drug book as a "new" drug.

    No fitted sheets- two flat sheets were used and tied under the bed at the top and the bottom. Also, making sure the seam of the sheet was facing down so it wouldn't irritate the skin



    You know what's really awful about this thread is the implication that so many of these things are "antiquated" - but it seems like "just yesterday" that I was doing those things!

    Can you hear the "old lady quaver" in my voice saying "back in MY day..." Gee, I think I ought to buy that cemetary plot now... If they still HAVE those! LOL

    As to the whiskey at the nurses' station, that made me laugh - was the whiskey for the PATIENTS or the NURSES' DT's?

    (sorry, I couldn't resist...)
  8. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from TreeSawRN

    You wanted to be like Dixie McCall RN
    HA HA HA!~
    Last edit by Liddle Noodnik on Dec 10, '06
  9. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from edna317
    ...This is fun. I may remember some more.
    Call bells were really BELLS. You had to figure out which room it came from.
    LONG LIST! Lots of hard work! And we think our workload is tough NOW!
  10. by   twotrees2
    Quote from huskersfan
    I remember the RN spilling mercury on the desk and these little beads of it rolling around everywhere. We had to gather up the mercury and then it all stayed together and she pushed it back into the bottle. I think she was putting the mercury in a dobhoff tube for weight. I was watching her do this and I think the mercury got on her wedding band and ate the gold off of her ring.. Does this sound correct? This was alot of years ago. I was an LPN so was just watching her.
    used to play with mercury in dads old tool chest to keep us entertained while we was kids- fun breaking it aprt and putting it back together olol.

    something i learned and still use with sensitive patients skin are montgomery straps ( thinks that what they were called lol)
  11. by   allantiques4me
    Quote from ruby vee
    i know i'm old -- i remember most of them, too!

    cleaned up the messiest stool without gloves, and didn't even panic about it -- just washed my hands and carried on.

    actually did mouth-to-mouth on my patients. had one vomit in my mouth, but went ahead and did it on the next patient to arrest on me anyway.

    hand crank beds -- the first electric bed i ever saw i played with until i put the attached iv pole through a flourescent light by accident. (that was spectacular!)

    putting maalox on bedsores.

    offering doctors your seat when they came into the nurse's station.

    mannitol in 50cc glass ampules -- they came up to the unit with a file taped to the ampule. first you heated them gently on the stove to warm them up and dissolve the contents, then you filed them open with the file! and if you warmed them too quickly, they exploded.

    paraldehyde -- anyone else remember chasing their patients around the unit, begging them to take their medicine before the cup dissolved?
    doesnt it amaze you that we never got sick????we never wore gloves.
  12. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from allantiques4me
    doesnt it amaze you that we never got sick????we never wore gloves.
    [font="comic sans ms"]
    we were lucky. or blessed!
  13. by   rntraveler
    Yes,I remember all that. I did dialysis on a pt who had a machine at home and was told I could wear gloves if I wanted to!! The gloves were there but I didn't feel the need and didn't think I could work with gloves on. Of course,now I use gloves all the time. Also, I sometimes work with nurses who are younger than my granddaughter! AND one of the last times I recerted for CPR,the instructor brought half mannequins that we could put on a table to save our knees.

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