"You are an angel!" - page 4

by ~*Stargazer*~ 3,535 Views | 35 Comments

*Hanging dilt on a patient in rapid a-fib, she says she's hungry, "I haven't eaten all day!" (it's 9:00 at night). Entire time I'm hanging the med; checking vitals, giving bolus, starting gtt, rechecking vitals, it's "Can I... Read More


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    Look at all the angel user names here and tell me. We perpetuate it.
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    ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed. View this video at YouTube
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    I think most people when they feel like crap and are scared, they want to feel normal. They focus on the little things that are within their realm. The sandwich, pillows, etc. They don't understand the meds, they don't understand what's wrong, and most don't really want to know, because it brings their mortality to life. Just a thought.
    But yeah, it is hilarious when they focus on something small, I had a guy who came in, early sepsis, and all because his son noticed his neuro changes. After some boluses, icing down for a temp over 105, etc. The guy just wanted some of his special water. He got it, but I did make a point to tell him that he should give his son some recognition, because he probably saved his life.
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    I don't know, when I go to the doctor I don't really think about the fact that he or she is drawing on their knowledge and experience to figure out what's wrong with me, and decide on the best approach to whatever problem I'm having. I sort of expect that. However I do like it when they're pleasant, seem interested, go out of their way if necessary to get me what I need. Given two doctors with the same skill, experience and ability, I'll choose the 'nice' one over the brusque or 'cold' one every time. That's just human nature.

    Nice isn't everything, but it sure goes a long way.
    talaxandra likes this.
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    i was once as sick as a dog and had to be admitted to a hospital, leaving my 3-year-old and my breastfeeding 9-month-old with their father, who i was in the process of divorcing because he was an abusive sob. the most fun was the blinding headache and my stretcher slamming into the doorframe on the way to radiology at the same time the tech is asking, "what's the diagnosis?" and the resident hollers out, "rule out subarachnoid hemorrhage!"

    well, it turned out that i (only) had meningitis, but it was a damn miserable coupla days. and what do i remember about my nurses the most? the night supervisor came in, no doubt to make a courtesy call on the nurse in the bed, found me weeping, and brought me a chocolate milkshake. that was the best damn milkshake i ever had in my life, and i will always him for it.

    another time i had what was supposed to be an epidural for childbirth that (oopsie!) turned out to be a high spinal, and i could not feel or move my legs for about 18 hours after they hauled her outta there with the big spoons. i was filthy and tired and gross in the morning, still immobile, and this nurse came in with a student and asked if i wanted a bath. i nearly wept with relief. she said, "would you mind if we both did it together?" and i said, hell, no, and they proceeded to give me an amazingly thorough bath, one on one side, one on the other, and changed my sheets, and brushed my hair. and told me what a beautiful baby i had. i told them they made me proud to be a nurse.

    now, i suppose that a sympathetic ear and a chocolate milkshake, a good roaring bath and clean sheets (and a few kind words about the darling product of my labor) weren't high-tech nursing, and god knows i can recognize and appreciate high-tech nursing and the expertise that goes into it. i loathe house's and other tv/movie misrepresentation of nursing and support sandy summers' truthaboutnursing.com and i completely agree with the tag line, "if caring were enough, anyone could be a nurse." but by heavens, thank goodness we are more than that. if i get a kind word for being an angel, i'll take it. i may add, gently, that it was a little more than the sandwich, but i'll take it. it's what they remember. the education can come another time.
    talaxandra and SandraCVRN like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from grntea
    i was once as sick as a dog and had to be admitted to a hospital, leaving my 3-year-old and my breastfeeding 9-month-old with their father, who i was in the process of divorcing because he was an abusive sob. the most fun was the blinding headache and my stretcher slamming into the doorframe on the way to radiology at the same time the tech is asking, "what's the diagnosis?" and the resident hollers out, "rule out subarachnoid hemorrhage!"

    well, it turned out that i (only) had meningitis, but it was a damn miserable coupla days. and what do i remember about my nurses the most? the night supervisor came in, no doubt to make a courtesy call on the nurse in the bed, found me weeping, and brought me a chocolate milkshake. that was the best damn milkshake i ever had in my life, and i will always him for it.

    another time i had what was supposed to be an epidural for childbirth that (oopsie!) turned out to be a high spinal, and i could not feel or move my legs for about 18 hours after they hauled her outta there with the big spoons. i was filthy and tired and gross in the morning, still immobile, and this nurse came in with a student and asked if i wanted a bath. i nearly wept with relief. she said, "would you mind if we both did it together?" and i said, hell, no, and they proceeded to give me an amazingly thorough bath, one on one side, one on the other, and changed my sheets, and brushed my hair. and told me what a beautiful baby i had. i told them they made me proud to be a nurse.

    now, i suppose that a sympathetic ear and a chocolate milkshake, a good roaring bath and clean sheets (and a few kind words about the darling product of my labor) weren't high-tech nursing, and god knows i can recognize and appreciate high-tech nursing and the expertise that goes into it. i loathe house's and other tv/movie misrepresentation of nursing and support sandy summers' truthaboutnursing.com and i completely agree with the tag line, "if caring were enough, anyone could be a nurse." but by heavens, thank goodness we are more than that. if i get a kind word for being an angel, i'll take it. i may add, gently, that it was a little more than the sandwich, but i'll take it. it's what they remember. the education can come another time.

    love this post grntea, i think it says it all.

    keeping the patients alive and safe will always be first on the list, but what i find sad is that i'm seeing increasing numbers of nurses who think a ''good roaring bath and clean sheets' are not a part of nursing at all.
    talaxandra likes this.


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