Yacker Tracker in the NICU ??? Yacker Tracker in the NICU ??? - pg.3 | allnurses

Yacker Tracker in the NICU ??? - page 3

So they just put one of these things on our unit. It's like a stoplight that goes yellow to red when there is too much noise. We are a small NICU unit. Seriously? I'm pretty insulted to be... Read More

  1. Visit  NicuGal profile page
    #26 1
    They were moving those around the floors...they disappeared from our unit pretty quickly when our poor withdrawl kids were screaming.
  2. Visit  brillohead profile page
    #27 7
    I'm in agreement that it's NON-VOICE noise that is the biggest problem.

    Respiratory carts, phlebotomy carts, vitals machines, ER stretchers, etc., all rattle down the halls and thump over the expansion joints / fire door jambs. Why can't they put rollerblade wheels on all those things so they glide quietly?

    Then you have the nurse phones, aide phones, and unit clerk phones.

    And the call lights, IV pump alarms, BiPAP/CPAP alarms, and constant bed alarms.

    And the doctors, charge nurses, respiratory therapists, and housekeepers all have beepers that go off at all hours of the night.

    And how about the tvs that are on MAX VOLUME because the LOLs and LOMs are deaf as a doorknob, and we can't close their door to muffle the sound because they're also a FALL RISK and we need to constantly be on the lookout for someone trying to go walkabout without permission.

    So, even if we get ALL of those things quieted down, we're still going in to give meds at 2030, then injecting them with heparin again at 2200, then waking them at 0000 for vitals, then waking them again at 0400 for vitals (if we didn't also wake them at 0200 for SoluMedrol or an antibiotic IVPB), then phlebotomy wakes them at 0500 for lab draws, then we're back in again at 0600 for "on an empty stomach" meds like Synthroid and Protonix, plus we have to shoot them in the belly with heparin again.

    WHEN THE HECK ARE THEY SUPPOSED TO GET ANY SLEEP????
  3. Visit  JadedCPN profile page
    #28 1
    Quote from Bezoars
    So they just put one of these things on our unit. It's like a stoplight that goes yellow to red when there is too much noise. We are a small NICU unit. Seriously? I'm pretty insulted to be treated like a child. I tend to pick my battles wisely but this is just too much.
    We had one of these at the first pediatric hospital I worked for, but only on certain units. Ours wasn't a stop light, it was shaped like an ear and there were three "levels" of the ear that would change from green, to yellow, to red when the noise was too much. I get the concept because in my experience yes we can get loud and carried away at times with report, etc but still it was super irritating because the thing was so sensitive; anything from monitors, vitals machines, visitors, families, and a whole list of other things would set it off.
    Last edit by JadedCPN on Jan 8 : Reason: Typo
  4. Visit  nrsang97 profile page
    #29 1
    I worked in a neuro ICU and ours was set so sensitive that if you dropped a tube from the tube station it went to red. Coughed too loud went to red, went into the supply room and the door closed it went to red. We would eventually have to shut it off.

    I do realize that we can be loud and not realize it, but some noise is just unavoidable. Eventually it stayed shut off.
  5. Visit  blondy2061h profile page
    #30 0
    Quote from brillohead

    And how about the tvs that are on MAX VOLUME because the LOLs and LOMs are deaf as a doorknob, and we can't close their door to muffle the sound because they're also a FALL RISK and we need to constantly be on the lookout for someone trying to go walkabout without permission.
    I go around and turn down people's TVs after they fall asleep. I can't focus at all with TVs blasting- a different station on every room.
  6. Visit  NurseCard profile page
    #31 1
    Wow, this is supposed to be used in classrooms, not in a workplace of adults!
    Just wow.
  7. Visit  Rocknurse profile page
    #32 4
    I kinda like the idea of this. I really hate noise and it ruins my concentration when there's too much noise, plus it's awful for the patients. I always worked hard to keep the noise levels down in the ICU at night so that patients could sleep. There are quite a few studies related to ICU psychosis and noise levels related to patients not getting ample sleep.


    My own personal pet peeve though is constant alarms that are ignored by nurses. I just can't understand that if your HR alarm is set at 100 and your patient's HR is 101 why you would just let that ring and ring. If they're known to be slightly tachy and are stable change your parameters slightly so that when something does go wrong someone might actually pay attention. It makes me batty! Constant noise is a stressor and negates actual important alarms. Alarm fatigue is a real thing, and a dangerous one,.
  8. Visit  BeckyESRN profile page
    #33 1
    My former employer tried this on our unit, we just switched the sensitivity and ignored it. It went away within a month or two. I'm a school nurse now and we use one in the elementary school lunch room.
  9. Visit  kbrn2002 profile page
    #34 1
    I work in a SNF and have thankfully never heard of such a thing. I can imagine the light would be red most of the night just from our sundowning dementia residents living their normal lives on their normal schedule. There's not enough staff in the building at night for worker noise to be a significant issue. Though I can see the night shifters having fun trying to get the thing to go to red as often as possible. As somebody else said, that's not it's intended purpose but faced with the indignity of being monitored for excess noise you can bet that creating as much excess noise as possible would become the goal.
  10. Visit  dharlow profile page
    #35 0
    True!
  11. Visit  JerseyTomatoMDCrab profile page
    #36 0
    We have one at my PRN job and had one at my first hospital job on m/s as well. Another pointless tool used by management to attempt to cater to unrealistic complaints from patients and staff. I heard my managers mentioning the "sound stop light" to patients and families, touting it as "yet another measure we have in place to ensure patients are as comfortable as possible while in the hospital." And then, with the tube system clanking, the IVs beeping, the tele alarms going off and poor granny getting no sleep, I would have complaints from family members "I thought you were trying to be quiet for the patients!!!"
  12. Visit  AliNajaCat profile page
    #37 4
    When I had ICU orientees one of the first experiential exercises I had them do was sit just outside their patients' open doors (it was a converted m/s unit and there were actual doors on the single and 2-bed rooms) and write down every sound they heard for five minutes. Just five minutes. ...

    phones ringing
    suction
    conversation
    portable x-ray driver
    floor-waxing Zamboni-equivalent
    beepers
    call lights
    vents, IPPB
    beds and stretchers
    CSR carts
    monitors, pumps
    bubbling Pleurevacs
    trash cans being emptied
    laundry cart
    breakfast trays
    slamming metal charts

    Most of it we didn't even register, but as they were not familiar background noises to the orientees-- and certainly the patients-- it made quite an impact. The combination of sensory overload (all of the above plus pain, tubes and wires, lights, intrusive touch...) and comcomitant sensory deprivation (no normal clothing, same bed all the time, no normal interpersonal touching, no normal food, no fresh air or change of scenery...) was what made people crazy.
  13. Visit  susummers1 profile page
    #38 0
    Don't be insulted. I have worked in hospitals that have them and they never really were perceived as a big issue. It helped remind us and visitors to be quiet. Most facilities are probably doing it because quiet environment is an HCAHPS question. I would think that you can't be the only unit in your facility that got one, if you are then be insulted.

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