Wrote up for being negative?!?!

  1. Has anyone here ever heard of people getting wrote up at work for "being negative"?

    There's a nurse at work that was wrote up for being negative at work.

    I had never heard of such a thing, thought I'd ask you all.
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  2. 40 Comments

  3. by   miko014
    No, never heard of that...but my ANM said to me yesterday, "it's so good to see you in a good mood. When you're in a bad mood, you put everybody in a bad mood." I said that the reason I was in a bad mood was becasue I could feel the tension on the unit the second I got off the elevator, and that the fact that everyone was overworked and stressed was a big part of why I (and everyone else) was not happy, but said said no. Apparantly I have the power to bring everyone down, even the shift before I get there. Imagine!
  4. by   Jo Dirt
    Negativity drags everyone down, and it seems like there are plenty of people who don't need a lot of encouragement to feed off it when a busybody complainer comes in the bunch. Pretty soon, though, nothing is right, everything is wrong and it's like a toilet bowl with everyone swirling and going down the drain together.
    I've worked with more negative people than easy to get along with people. I can tell you for true, though, people who are easy to get along with, who will work with other people rather than against them, who don't needle and complain when a dressing change may not get done on one shift and quietly do it and move on rather than expend energy making sure the whole unit knows about it, those kinds of people are priceless.
    I say throw the book at negative gripes. There is no need to put up with it.

    I'm unfortunate to be married to a griper, and his elderly father who lives in a trailer next door is 100 times worse. Criticize and complain, contradicts himself to accomodate having a reason to gripe. I can't even hide that I can't stand the old man, anymore, and I never go to his trailer unless it is an absolute necessity.
    What was disheartening was the sitter we hired to stay with him was more than eager to feed off the negativity and we heard some pretty nasty things going on in there. A baby monitor nipped that in the bud, though, and she's been as sweet as can be ever since.
    Sometimes, people just need a little attitude adjustment. Maybe being written up will "help" this nurse out with hers.
  5. by   TheCommuter
    I readily agree that negativity dampens the workplace morale. When social contagion occurs, one negative worker can quite possibly spread the negativity to his or her coworkers.

    However, negativity is way too subjective of an issue to result in a completely fair write-up or disciplinary action. One nurse manager might think I am being refreshingly straightforward, whereas another nurse manager might think I am being supposedly 'negative'. Negativity is subjective; in addition, it is subject to interpretation.
  6. by   Uptoherern
    also had a co-worker brought in to HR and given a "talking to" about being "negative". excellent nurse, knowledgable, long time nurse, wonderful resource nurse. What was he so "negative" about? Staffing levels, poor working conditions, crappy equipment, treatment of staff..... and I agreed with him 100% on every complaint. HE, however, was the "vocal" one, and therefore got the attention of mgmt and got the "talking to". Basically, they threatened to fire him if he didn't stop.

    what a bunch of crap.
  7. by   TrudyRN
    i think maybe the lesson to be learned is to either take action or hush up. we nurses need to take action a whole lot more than we do.
  8. by   Tweety
    Unless you were a fly on the wall, you really don't know what the conversation with the person and their supervisor was.

    But yes, I've heard people being written up for negativity. Usually it has to be a specific incident, rather than "you're too negative". I'm guessing that this person said something that was negative and this was used in an attempt to improve the person's attitude.

    When I was a charge nurse I never wrote anyone up for "negativity", but during annual reviews if a person had a negative attitude I would let them know about it.

    We all have legitimate concerns and need to vent sometimes, but some people are just so over the top with constant whining and complaining it warrents supervisory intervention.
  9. by   grannyNan
    There is a difference between standing up for what one believes and being negative. The trick is knowing the difference. Everything has a time and a place. It would be considered "negative" to yell, belittle or otherwise bash a coworker, or the facility in the middle of the hall with patients, visitors and other staff in full view or earshot. Same goes at the nursing station or breakroom. Somehow we as a society have decided that it is okay to be rude and disrepectful in the name of standing up for ourselves. I'm here to tell you it is not! I have recommended a nurse be fired for being negative because she was so toxic for the staff and the hospital that to keep her would be suicide for all. So yes, I think it is perfectly O.K. to fire someone for being negative if the proper steps have been taken and the negativity can not or will not be stopped any other way.
  10. by   dali92
    Quote from erdiane
    also had a co-worker brought in to HR and given a "talking to" about being "negative". excellent nurse, knowledgable, long time nurse, wonderful resource nurse. What was he so "negative" about? Staffing levels, poor working conditions, crappy equipment, treatment of staff..... and I agreed with him 100% on every complaint. HE, however, was the "vocal" one, and therefore got the attention of mgmt and got the "talking to". Basically, they threatened to fire him if he didn't stop.

    what a bunch of crap.
    I agree, there people that are frustrated w/poor working cond. & poor management, etc. that are perceived as negative. These people will eventually leave when they see things won't improve & nothing at the place will ever change-- places like this like newbies until the newbies get a clue- sometimes yrs down the road & then THEY leave-- one manager even TOLD me that he expected nurses to turnover every 5 yrs!! The problem is management doesn't really CARE about retaining hardworking faithful employees- or working to improve conditions-- it is far cheaper to hire newbies and pay them less --and so on. What is sad, is that rather than listen to the long-term employee, management just yells "negative" "poor morale" & are willing to lose a very good nurse & hire one w/maybe less experience or not as skilled, and coddle this person & put up w/all kinds of cr*p if they're "happy" and not complaining -for a while. Sorry to sound "negative" but there are 2 sides to every story. It is far easier to play 'stepford nurse' & lie low & stay out of the limelight- IOW put up & shut up. Sound like Russia? or maybe Iraq.......
    Last edit by dali92 on Feb 2, '07
  11. by   Ginger35
    I can sort of relate to that. However, I wasn't written up for being negative. My annual eval was recently done. I like my manager - can't stand our CNO - (pretty much a lazy, fat, draconian, tyrant) - Anyways, getting back the annual eval, my manager couldn't find anything to ding me on except "improve attude".

    I said say what? - I'm the one that trys to find humor in things to keep us going in the department - even when things are really stressful (of course not within ear shot of patients or anything). Plus, I'm willing to help other areas out in the hospital when I really don't have to - starting IV's on the floor, helping with computer stuff such as registration & billing. Willing to go to the floor to help when an patient goes bad and starts swirling the drain et al......

    My response was - okay cite where my "attitude" has effected my performance or the performance of others - She could not - nor could she cite a patient complaint against me. (I'm sure there is some grumbling out there, but nothing that has made it back to management - *yet*).

    So again, another eval with an area mentioned where I could "improve" to keep my annual raise at 3% instead of 4% based on subjective criteria. There is no way to prove measurable improvements or declines in this area.

    So, here again the bottom line prevails. They just don't want to give out a 4% raise to anyone and will find way not to do it. No matter what there true performance level is.

    I just don't understand this profession in many ways. When you compare this profession to others - there are promotions based on "merit", "education" "performance, & "experience" - In nursing, one may find an institution that significantly gives pay incentives to obtain higher degrees or certifications, of course performance, and maybe experience. Yet they will make something up not to give you what you deserve as far as promotions or raises....Pretty sad considering that there are shortages currently that are not expected to improve anytime soon.......
  12. by   MALE*RN*777
    Yes I've heard of this but would be easily challenged because what is negative to some is not to others. We are told about being professional at work but again what is professional to some is not to others. When I'm making or stating an opinion I make sure I state that it is my professional opinion. Being negative and stating a fact is also 2 different things. Again, not knowing the content of the conversation between the 2 staff members I couldn't say but as the saying goes "We agree to disagree".
  13. by   penguin2
    Quote from Ginger35
    I can sort of relate to that. However, I wasn't written up for being negative. My annual eval was recently done. I like my manager - can't stand our CNO - (pretty much a lazy, fat, draconian, tyrant) - Anyways, getting back the annual eval, my manager couldn't find anything to ding me on except "improve attude".

    I said say what? - I'm the one that trys to find humor in things to keep us going in the department - even when things are really stressful (of course not within ear shot of patients or anything). Plus, I'm willing to help other areas out in the hospital when I really don't have to - starting IV's on the floor, helping with computer stuff such as registration & billing. Willing to go to the floor to help when an patient goes bad and starts swirling the drain et al......

    My response was - okay cite where my "attitude" has effected my performance or the performance of others - She could not - nor could she cite a patient complaint against me. (I'm sure there is some grumbling out there, but nothing that has made it back to management - *yet*).

    So again, another eval with an area mentioned where I could "improve" to keep my annual raise at 3% instead of 4% based on subjective criteria. There is no way to prove measurable improvements or declines in this area.

    So, here again the bottom line prevails. They just don't want to give out a 4% raise to anyone and will find way not to do it. No matter what there true performance level is.

    I just don't understand this profession in many ways. When you compare this profession to others - there are promotions based on "merit", "education" "performance, & "experience" - In nursing, one may find an institution that significantly gives pay incentives to obtain higher degrees or certifications, of course performance, and maybe experience. Yet they will make something up not to give you what you deserve as far as promotions or raises....Pretty sad considering that there are shortages currently that are not expected to improve anytime soon.......
    And isn't it interesting that rather than sit an employee down & get to the root of this sudden "negativity" management chooses to believe whatever gossip is slung their way. Why not look beyond that & find out WHY morale is low- WHY good nurses are leaving-- get to the root of the problem?? To say all good things & ding you on a vague unsubstantiated complaint such as "poor attitude" & then dock your raise is insurance that if you don't have a poor attitude you will soon!! I don't know how management can get away w/vague statements like that & not have to cite SPECIFIC incidents- and not gossip-- furthermore, if a problem is big enough to be brought up on a yearly eval, shouldn't this have been addressed w/the employee when the alleged "problem" was first noticed?? The same thing is happening where I work, everyone is suddenly getting dinged on vague unsubstantiated things & getting raises docked. Why not just make an announcement: In the interest of cost containment we have changed the raises from X% to Y%??? The way they're doing things is REALLY bringing morale down!!
  14. by   Pepper The Cat
    I got written up for being negative once. What was I negative about, you may ask? Moving 10 pts (beds, bedside tables, overbed tables +belongings) to make 1 patient happy. Waiting 3 hours for my patient to be put into the computer by admitting so that I could chart, etc. People on the next shift coming in late, forcing me to leave late, as someone had to wait for them and I was the only "single" person on - (read - no kids, husband waiting for me). And so forth. I was hit with this without warning, repremended, received a written warning - went home and cried for the rest of the evening. I learned my lesson with that manager though - no matter what happened I kept my mouth shut. When she asked for my opinion about anything, I just told her what she wanted to hear. I was so glad when she left. Current managed likes it when I tell her something isn't working! Go figure!

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