Wrote a doctor up!!! - page 3

Last week I felt I was verbally abused by a doc. I am probably too nice to some of them at times, so maybe they think it means I am a push over. We had an 89 year old NH patient come to the floor... Read More

  1. by   MarySunshine
    Quote from steelcityrn
    I Feel The Nurse Did Not Follow The Correct Line Of Asst. With This Problem. Why Was The Supervisor Not Called To Help With The Situaton Before Calling The Dr At 1030 At Night For A Line. Sorry But I Agree With He Dr Here.
    You think he should have screamed at her irrationally? I disagree -- Obviously the correct course of action needs to be more clearly spelled out for nurses having this problem w/ patient's lines. Until then, this nurse was doing what she thought best and did not deserve to be yelled at.

    Daytonite-- how do you know if a line has clotted -- difficulty flushing? If the bag hanging is dry, but the line flushes easily and has blood return would it be acceptable to use the site? Thanks for your input and for standing up for a fellow nurse.
  2. by   wolfgirl
    It almost sounds as if he just plain didn't know how to resolve the issue, so he dumped it back in your lap and figured if he yelled loudly enough and long enough you'd just "handle" it and leave him alone.
  3. by   lilVAnurse
    There are some doctors who view nurses as a lesser being i am overjoyed to hear someone speak up about this occurance
  4. by   Daytonite
    Quote from MarySunshine
    Daytonite-- how do you know if a line has clotted --
    When you hang the new bag of fluids and it doesn't drip, even with the roller clamp wide open--it's clotted off. If you can see a steaking of blood backing up into the IV tubing and the fluids don't run when you open up the roller clamp--it's clotted off.
  5. by   ShayRN
    Quote from Tenesma
    why would you take a foot IV out --- flush it and use it. Instead you subjected this poor patient to a bunch of sticks for no good reason....

    And exlain to me how flushing an IV is going to cause a clinically significant thrombus (unless she has a wide open PFO with right to left shunt) in a patient whose INR is 6.... gimme a break
    WOW, can't believe the venom dripping here. I don't feel she was subjected to a bunch of sticks for no good reason, I feel I utilized critical thinking skills...But, hey, you want to push a thrombus into someone's system go for it. Hope it works for you.
    Last edit by ShayRN on Oct 27, '05
  6. by   ShayRN
    Quote from steelcityrn
    I Feel The Nurse Did Not Follow The Correct Line Of Asst. With This Problem. Why Was The Supervisor Not Called To Help With The Situaton Before Calling The Dr At 1030 At Night For A Line. Sorry But I Agree With He Dr Here.
    So you feel if a nurse makes a mistake, it is ok to be verbally abused? Maybe I should have called a supervisor first, but that is no excuse to scream at me. I won't tolerate it from my husband, I will be darned if I will tolerate it from a doctor.
  7. by   ShayRN
    To everyone else, thank you for your kind words. Yes, I do feel IV's that are clotted should be changed. I don't mind admitting when I make a mistake, but I do feel this doctor was totally out of line. It is high time that we nurses start standing up for ourselves. I am a Professional, I demand to be treated as such. My dh works for the post office, I can ASSURE you that if a female employee was treated the way we are treated on a daily basis she would sue the pants off the government. There is a very strict, no harrassment policy. It is 2005, I don't have to put up with the "handmaiden" mentality from anyone. Nor will I.
  8. by   martymoose
    [quote=kadokin]
    Quote from gr8rnpjt
    I had a funny thought when I read this. Would it be appropriate to tell the physician in question that none of the nurses are currently (non PG13 phonetic), but if he could leave his #, you'd call him back as soon as you found a nurse engaged in said behavior. Just a thought!

    OMG that is funny i wonder what the doc would say after that
    Last edit by Thunderwolf on Oct 29, '05 : Reason: Non PG13 phonetic edited out
  9. by   psalm
    ...no one needs to be yelled at or called a name. We are supposed to be professionals. A good answer to "let me talk to the (non-PG13 word) nurse" , could be, "I don't believe this hospital has any nurses that are described by that adjective".
    Last edit by Thunderwolf on Oct 28, '05 : Reason: inappropriate phonetic edited out
  10. by   Agnus
    Quote from ShayRN
    To everyone else, thank you for your kind words. Yes, I do feel IV's that are clotted should be changed. I don't mind admitting when I make a mistake, but I do feel this doctor was totally out of line. It is high time that we nurses start standing up for ourselves. I am a Professional, I demand to be treated as such. My dh works for the post office, I can ASSURE you that if a female employee was treated the way we are treated on a daily basis she would sue the pants off the government. There is a very strict, no harrassment policy. It is 2005, I don't have to put up with the "handmaiden" mentality from anyone. Nor will I.
    I am going to add something here. You stated "I am a professional and I demand to be treated as such" Try this on. NO ONE professional or not deserves to be treated like this. Would the doctor advocate treating patients like this? Probably not. It is not just that we are professionals we are people period. By the way it is not just "feamale employees" who would sue. It is not just females who get mistreated.
    As far as suing that IS always an option in any job not just government jobs. A few law suits on employers who tollerate violence (yes it is violence) and on the individuals (Physicians, nurses, supervisors, co workers) who do this and it would end.
  11. by   Tweety
    Quote from Daytonite
    I can answer your question for you. You NEVER flush a clogged IV--NEVER. .............It really irks me that nurses are the first to say they are advocates of kind, loving care for patients, yet they will abuse the hell out of an existing IV because they don't want to have to re-start it. Veins are part of a person and need care and protection also, not Roger Ramjet coming at them with flush after flush trying to save an IV that is already finished.

    Excellent answer. I don't presume the OP just pulled an IV that she didn't try to flush. If there's any resistance whatsoever, you pull it. The op indicated that it was clogged.

    It's a poor and dangerous practice to flush a clogged IV. People have strokes, MI's, PE's in the hospital all the time. Whose to say it didn't initially come from a nurse who said "what's the risk of a thrombus in a pt with an INR of 6 (The INR of 6 means there's a small chance of a clot forming, but if the IV is clogged, it's clogged with something)???"
    Last edit by Tweety on Oct 28, '05
  12. by   Tweety
    Quote from steelcityrn
    I Feel The Nurse Did Not Follow The Correct Line Of Asst. With This Problem. Why Was The Supervisor Not Called To Help With The Situaton Before Calling The Dr At 1030 At Night For A Line. Sorry But I Agree With He Dr Here.

    I almost mentioned this, but didn't. I don't agree with the docs behavior however. I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt that while you agree with the doc you don't agree it was appropriate to yell and brow beat this nurse into getting an IV.

    In the end the patient got the IV. Too bad this couldn't have been done prior to calling the doc and getting yelled at.

    But I understand, because I don't routinely call our supervisors because we have a hard stick that we can't get. We use all the best people on the unit, and call other units for help (we have no IV team). When I'm sure the best of the best have tried and missed (usually no more than three people), I do what the op did. I call the MD, How could the OP have known there was a good IV team member in another unit?

    (P.S. captilizing the first letter of each word makes it a difficult read. FYI. )
    Last edit by Tweety on Oct 28, '05
  13. by   CrunchRN
    Shay,

    You are totally correct that he was completely out of line, and I am proud of you for reporting him. There is no justifying that kind of behavior. I truly wish more nurses would act like you did and then we would not have this problem.

    To those of you who made nasty comments - you are preventing nurses from ever moving forward and getting respect. Your behavior allows the doctors to get away with this crap. Did you ever, for even one moment, consider supporting your fellow nurse?

close