Write-Ups & Disciplinary Action - page 4

Has anyone ever been written-up or suspended by their place of employment? I received my first write-up today after nine months on the job. I am the type of person who can accept full... Read More

  1. by   NurseCard
    The last place that I worked, I did not have a single writeup in 6.5 years of employment. Then we got a new nurse manager on my floor, and I received two within a span of a couple of months. The first one I didn't deserve and I actually got torn up and thrown away. The second one I probably did deserve because it involved a patient that was in my care at the time of the incident; however I wasn't the one who was present in the room of the patient at the time of the infraction.
  2. by   clee1
    I graduate from LPN school in two weeks, but I currently work as a MA at an Urgent Care clinic. I've been there 7 months and have had two diciplinary writeups (to go along with 10 or so customer and coworker commendations).

    The first was d/t failing to notice a critical value on a returned lab test. This happened early in my second month of employment, and nobody had ever said that my duties included review of lab results - I thought I was just supposed to marry them with the pt's chart and leave them for the MD. The pt was OK, and the writeup was pure keester-covering on the part of the management that had a gaping hole in their vaunted "system". Not fair, but I did learn from it. NOW, I review EVERY lab result that comes back while I'm on duty for critical values. I was told that I should be able to recognise critical lab values and stat them to the MD. OK then.....

    The second writeup just occurred about three weeks ago. In this case, I triaged a pt. on the weekend when our regular MDs were off duty (and the w/e doc was well known to cut corners). He was in for a shoulder problem. At the end of the H&P session, I asked if he "had any other sx the MD needed to be aware of"? Yes, the hand of the affected arm felt cold. COLD! Ok.... I did a visual comparison of the two hands and one was, sure enough, pale when the other was wnl. OK.... so... I check bilat radial pulses, and sure enough, the affected extremity was 1+ intensity when the other was 3+. I documented the appearance of the hand and my assessment of the bilat pulses. OK fine. The pt was referred to a vascular specialist at our affiliated hospital and all ended well, or so I thought.

    Monday, the regular Doc,and Med Director for our facility (a jackazz by any objective standard) came in and was reviewing charts from the weekend. When he came to this pt's chart and saw my documentation, he went nuts! Yelling at me in the hallway, saying that "you have neither the training or knowledge to make such an assessment", etc. Well maybe I didn't handle this very well, but I told him that times have changed and nurses are required by statute to do physical assessments and document objective data; that one of the first things taught in nursing school these days was physical assessments, and that if I was supposed to have knowledge of critical lab values (see the first writeup, which I'm sure he was the butt-coverer-in-chief on) it could be presumed that I could tell if a hand was cold and that two pulses had differing intensities! His statement was to the effect of "you are not a nurse yet and you work under my license now". And my reply was "Wrong again, Doctor. I work under the license of the MD on duty at the time. You weren't here."

    I thought the subject was closed, but.... guess again. The next day I walked in to work to be met by my immediate supervisor with a writeup. Dr. Jackazz had insisted that I be written up for "overstepping my scope of practice" when in reality (and everyone else who works there knows it) it was because I had the gall to face-off with him. Anyway, I didn't sign the writeup, and insisted on a meeting with the VP for Clinic Operations, the corporate head of all the hospital's satellite clinics. Once my record was reviewed and my side of the story was presented, the writeup went into the trash.

    Do I have to say that when I DO have a license to protect, I won't be working at THIS Urgent Care?

    I pity the fool that thinks he/she is going to "eat me for lunch" and I could care less what initials follow their name.
  3. by   Sheri257
    I used to work as an aide in a hospital where night shift used to always write up day shift. It was like ... every time you walked in the next morning, you wondered who night shift would write up next. I guess they didn't have anything better to do.

    I got written up one day when I had a really bad run ... 13 patients, four total cares, six others with non-stop diarrhea. There's no doubt that the run was a mess when night shift took over but, there was absolutely nothing I could do about it with that kind of patient load.

    Some patient supposedly complained I refused to change the sheets on her bed and that her husband had to do it. Only problem was ... the linen was in a room with a code key that no patient had access to so, how did the husband get the linen to change the bed since I supposedly refused to do it.

    I had enough. I was in RN school and didn't need to take that crap so ... I quit the next day. If that's how they want to treat people, they can take the job and shove it.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 30, '06
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Meloney
    I am not a nurse yet, but in my past corporate experience, I found that CEOs and top managers who described the company environment as "we are all family here" were also the first to manipulate, be unsupportive, and unceremoniously lay people off like they were taking out the trash at the end of the week.
    I call it the "F" word ...

    When they start talking "Family" ... you KNOW that most of the time, the place is going to be a cut throat hellhole

    Run for the hills !!!

    :chuckle
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 30, '06
  5. by   muffie
    it helps me to sleep soundly at night knowing that there are those in the world ever so quick to illuminate our horrifying mistakes to the rest of the world, those that live in a house of glass...
  6. by   Sheri257
    Quite frankly, this is one of the reasons I'll never work for a non-union hospitals. They can't get away with this crap so easily at a union hospital.

    :typing
  7. by   FNimuaeMae
    I got written up when we got a new nurse manager...never have had a written warning at this job, and then she leaves and the acting manager is reviewing all those written warnings and downgrading them to verbal warnings....very strange situation.

    M
  8. by   Sheri257
    Quote from TrudyRN
    Please tell me that your boss tore up the writeup when she realized you weren't even at work when you allegedly offended.
    Yeah ... I'd really like to hear this story as well.

    :typing
  9. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from clee1
    I graduate from LPN school in two weeks, but I currently work as a MA at an Urgent Care clinic. I've been there 7 months and have had two diciplinary writeups (to go along with 10 or so customer and coworker commendations).

    The first was d/t failing to notice a critical value on a returned lab test. This happened early in my second month of employment, and nobody had ever said that my duties included review of lab results - I thought I was just supposed to marry them with the pt's chart and leave them for the MD. The pt was OK, and the writeup was pure keester-covering on the part of the management that had a gaping hole in their vaunted "system". Not fair, but I did learn from it. NOW, I review EVERY lab result that comes back while I'm on duty for critical values. I was told that I should be able to recognise critical lab values and stat them to the MD. OK then.....

    The second writeup just occurred about three weeks ago. In this case, I triaged a pt. on the weekend when our regular MDs were off duty (and the w/e doc was well known to cut corners). He was in for a shoulder problem. At the end of the H&P session, I asked if he "had any other sx the MD needed to be aware of"? Yes, the hand of the affected arm felt cold. COLD! Ok.... I did a visual comparison of the two hands and one was, sure enough, pale when the other was wnl. OK.... so... I check bilat radial pulses, and sure enough, the affected extremity was 1+ intensity when the other was 3+. I documented the appearance of the hand and my assessment of the bilat pulses. OK fine. The pt was referred to a vascular specialist at our affiliated hospital and all ended well, or so I thought.

    Monday, the regular Doc,and Med Director for our facility (a jackazz by any objective standard) came in and was reviewing charts from the weekend. When he came to this pt's chart and saw my documentation, he went nuts! Yelling at me in the hallway, saying that "you have neither the training or knowledge to make such an assessment", etc. Well maybe I didn't handle this very well, but I told him that times have changed and nurses are required by statute to do physical assessments and document objective data; that one of the first things taught in nursing school these days was physical assessments, and that if I was supposed to have knowledge of critical lab values (see the first writeup, which I'm sure he was the butt-coverer-in-chief on) it could be presumed that I could tell if a hand was cold and that two pulses had differing intensities! His statement was to the effect of "you are not a nurse yet and you work under my license now". And my reply was "Wrong again, Doctor. I work under the license of the MD on duty at the time. You weren't here."

    I thought the subject was closed, but.... guess again. The next day I walked in to work to be met by my immediate supervisor with a writeup. Dr. Jackazz had insisted that I be written up for "overstepping my scope of practice" when in reality (and everyone else who works there knows it) it was because I had the gall to face-off with him. Anyway, I didn't sign the writeup, and insisted on a meeting with the VP for Clinic Operations, the corporate head of all the hospital's satellite clinics. Once my record was reviewed and my side of the story was presented, the writeup went into the trash.

    Do I have to say that when I DO have a license to protect, I won't be working at THIS Urgent Care?

    I pity the fool that thinks he/she is going to "eat me for lunch" and I could care less what initials follow their name.
    Right on, Sister! Just please tell me you immediately notified a physician about the patient's condition (neurovascular compromiste) and did not merely document it.
    Last edit by TrudyRN on Nov 30, '06
  10. by   TrudyRN
    This thread has made me realize, however belatedly in my own career, just how awful some people really are. I've been such a goof, thinking people were basically decent. Well, I still want to believe good about most people but my eyes have been opened to how stupid, ridiculous, and just plain mean and unfair some people are. and how careless. Imagine writing up someone who was not even at work or even in the, by God, state when the offense took place.
  11. by   NurseyTee
    Wow, this thread has been an eye opener and I'm a little worried at this point. I had to write up an STNA last night and she was pissed! Firing off accusations at me after she was clocked out.

    Here's what happened. Lights going off like crazy, I go looking for her and find her in the TV room with another aide, feet propped up watching TV. I ask her why she didn't answer Mrs. X's light. She said, "Well, the other aide's pager didn't go off." I ask her where her pager is and she replies she doesn't know. I go to get her another one and give it to her. Mrs. X wanted some cereal before she had to go out for dialysis in an hour or so, I told her that was what she wanted and she replied. "I can't get the cereal and milk, I don't have keys to the kitchen.":smackingf She knows the drill and that I have the key, she's done it a zillion times before. I hand her the key she gets the cereal. Okay, all's okay now? Nope. I walk into the nurses station and there sits her pager AGAIN. I take the pager to her and say "Is this the pager I just gave you?" and she replies nastily.. "Yeah, I guess." I hand it to her and walk away. I had to leave the floor (I was the only nurse on the floor at the time.) to get some PPD for a 2nd step that needed to be given that shift. I come back up and her pager is in the nurses station again! By this time the unit manager has come in to help me out, I tell her what has been happening and she agrees she wants her clocked out. This is more d/t past problems with this aide and the other one that was watching TV all shift. This night was just the last straw. She's had a horrible attitude and will absolutely refuse to do tasks that are given by the DON and ADON. I had never written anyone up or clocked anyone out in my 8 yrs of nursing before last night. I really didn't want to do it but I knew her putting the pager back everytime I gave it back to her was her way of thumbing her nose at me, again bad attitude. She was yelling and carrying on after being clocked out, she refused to leave the facility and was telling the unit manager that I had left them on the floor alone for over 3 hours. I replied that there were cameras everywhere and they could see my coming and goings very easily and it simply wasn't true.

    I know the Administrator met with her today and I don't know the outcome. I'm nervous because I'm the type that doesn't like hostility or uncomfortable feelings where we're trying to work and I know it's not going to end here if she stays on. I'm stressed to say the least. I wish I didn't have to do this.
  12. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from HHC_LPN
    I'm nervous because I'm the type that doesn't like hostility or uncomfortable feelings where we're trying to work and I know it's not going to end here if she stays on. I'm stressed to say the least. I wish I didn't have to do this.
    Don't beat yourself up over the situation because you had to do whatever you had to do.

    I, too, prefer a harmonious work environment as opposed to a hostile work environment. Nurse managers who ride employee's backs and write workers up for every little offense can strike horrendous blows to the morale of the workplace. However, it seemed that your actions were fair and warranted.
  13. by   storm06
    You are all welcome to come and nurse in the great Land Down Under.
    I promise not to be nice to your face and then stab you in the back. I promise that regardless of any mistake u might make you will be listened to with compassion and empathy. I promise not to accuse you of breech of your nursing practice while u are away on your honeymoon. I promise not to write you up for unauthorised use of the computer. I promise not to sack u for spending an extra 10 minutes in the loo because you have worked 10 hours short staffed, underpaid, dealing with demanding paternalistic doctors, dealing with families,,,,, and you really just need to sit and contemplate why u r a nurse in the first place.
    I have never experienced nor to the best of my knowledge worked with anyone who has been written up in the way u guys describe. It sounds just awful, and my empathy to those of you who have gone though it. I made an error a few months ago. There was never any talk of writing me up or reporting me. The nurse manager and staff were very supportive, I was allowed to have a cry, explain what went wrong and then talk about ways to prevent it from happening again. I think if I had someone ranting and raving at me it would have been enough to make me quit.
    Hang in there guys. Remember if it gets to much we can always use more fantastic nurses like yourselves in Australia

close