Would you take a job with lower pay and lesser benefits if you thought it would help? - page 2

So, right now, I'm frustrated. I recently took a full time job at the SNF I have been working at for 18 months. This means I left my other job as a tech, at an employer where I received excellent... Read More

  1. by   dishes
    Quote from purplegal
    I'm starting to think it would have been best to fail nursing school altogether. Obviously nursing is only going to be a good experience for everyone but me. No wonder I got hired at this place. Anyone who actually has a choice would in no way choose to work for an employer that pays less and withholds benefits for 2 months. I might as well be unemployed.
    I am not sure if you are aware, but you have a pattern of making these types of statements in your threads and they can come across as a communication style that is common in histrionic personality. If this is how you come across in the workplace, you may unintentionally alienate colleagues and managers.
    Last edit by dishes on Nov 10
  2. by   Been there,done that
    Looking back is a complete waste of time and energy. $26 bucks is better than no bucks.
    See my latest thread, be happy you have a job to go to.

    Don't forget to smile and nod.... your patient's and co-workers are getting those negative vibes.
  3. by   Jedrnurse
    Quote from Davey Do
    No., I wouldn't.
    Well...I might, maybe?
  4. by   SaltineQueen
    Quote from purplegal
    If my first job had worked out, I'd be making $33 or $34/hr by now. But instead of being a cardiac nurse, I get to work in a SNF for $26/hr and no benefits for 2 months. Nice....

    And chances are I'll never be a cardiac nurse again. SO many things I'll never get to do. Yep, so while everyone I know has made their way up to ICU with good pay and benefits, I get all the crap.
    Stop with the "if"s and "but"s. What's done is done. Kick butt in this job and you will be rewarded, maybe not monetarily - which seems to be your major motivation - however. I still say you need counseling.
  5. by   SaltineQueen
    Quote from purplegal
    And now I found out my benefits don't go into effect for 2 months
    That's not too uncommon. You might be eligible for COBRA from your previous job if you think it might be necessary.
  6. by   elkpark
    Quote from purplegal
    Is that right? Thanks for sharing. I was starting to get angry because I thought I was getting screwed over again. Good to know it happens other places.
    It would be a good idea to quit spending so much time and energy worrying about whether you're "getting screwed over again" and use that time and energy to be digging your way out of the career hole you've put yourself in. Most of the "screwing over" you experience seems to have been self-inflicted, based on your previous threads. Time to move forward! Best wishes!
  7. by   LovingLife123
    Very few places start benefits right away. Very few. Most places don't start benefits until 90 days after hire.

    Why do you choose to see negativity at every turn in your life? I think you might have some underlying mental illness that you need to have evaluated. I'm not saying this to be harsh, but I've followed all of your posts. A lot of your thinking process does not make sense.

    You need to stop thinking about the ICU for now. You just do. Stop talking to anyone that went to nursing school with you. I had like 20 people in my cohort, I'm still the only one in icu and I started there immediately after graduation. Everyone has found their niche in nursing and icu is not the end all for everyone. Some of my classmates are in L&D, some oncology, a few at a heart hospital on the floor. There's a couple that moved to work at a very prestigious hospital in our country. Neither in icu. Some are in home health. All of my former classmates are happy. Stop thinking only icu is going to make you inherently happy.

    You need to get good nursing experience right. No matter where. You still are not grasping you were fired from an acute care position. That's going to follow you for a bit.

    Work hard at this job and give it your all. And for goodness sake, stop comparing yourself to others, and forget about your precious tech job you had. It was dumb to have that job when you are a RN.
  8. by   chacha82
    Quote from purplegal
    God, I just hate to think about how much I would be making if I had that job. Who knows...maybe by this point I would be moving on to the ICU like my other classmates and have a real career.
    Stop thinking about it. You can't change 1 thing without changing a myriad of others. $26/hour is good money in nursing and you have a full-time job. Working in a SNF is a real career, it's not less than. Benefits are a colossal headache at many places, so don't fixate on that. I hate to say "Well it could be worse" but it truly could be. If you have your health, be grateful and use it to your advantage to go in everyday to that SNF and give awesome care to your patients. Some people put 100% of their $26/hr (or less) into childcare to hold a job in the first place so they can get benefits, piddly or not, but they need them because their spouse's job provides no benefits. Sure, some people want NICU, cardiac ICU, OR, whatever, but work nights in a specialty they're not really into because that's where they landed.

    I have been in a similar situation where I worked a job I loved (in another field) for five years. I felt like it was my "dream job" but I was downsized out of it. My parents listened to me whine for a bit and then nicely told me to get a grip. A dream job isn't a dream job anymore if you've been let go, laid off, whatever. They told me I had done everything I could to try and keep that job (I had) but that the writing was on the wall and it was time for me to see it. I could waste time spinning my wheels or I could hit the pavement and get another job, which I did after a few weeks.

    Someone right now is pining away for the job you have at this very moment. It's not better to be unemployed; think about that for a second. If you establish a record of not being able to work in any position as a nurse, how would that help you get the ICU job that you want?
    Last edit by chacha82 on Nov 10
  9. by   beekee
    I just noticed you posted a slew of "woe is me" posts again. Stop. Just stop. How long ago were you fired/forced to quit your acute care job? Over a year, right? The version of the past in your head does not seem to be what actually happened. You still are not accepting responsibility for your failures. You are still not taking responsibility for your career. Until you do that, you will continue to be miserable. You need to let it go.
  10. by   purplegal
    Quote from beekee
    I just noticed you posted a slew of "woe is me" posts again. Stop. Just stop. How long ago were you fired/forced to quit your acute care job? Over a year, right? The version of the past in your head does not seem to be what actually happened. You still are not accepting responsibility for your failures. You are still not taking responsibility for your career. Until you do that, you will continue to be miserable. You need to let it go.
    It was almost 2 years ago and it still haunts me. It seems like that failure will hold me back for a long, long time. I was constantly reminded by it everytime I applied for a new job this past year, and was told no. The only nursing jobs I've been able to get offers for, ever since, have been in nursing facilities and home health. Losing that job is one of my biggest regrets and my biggest failure in life and I feel I will be paying for it the rest of my life by being excluded from certain areas of nursing. No one else that I know of screwed up their career, only me, and they are all moving ahead in their careers. They won't be stuck in geriatrics or home health, but I might. Of course I know it's my fault, not anyone else's. That's why I took the SNF job at all. But you would have thought, after 18 months of experience, I would have been reconsidered. I'm thinking it would have been best to never have that cardiac job at all, because obviously I have too high of expectations for jobs. I'd probably be fine with the job I have now if I'd never had the other one.
  11. by   purplegal
    Quote from LovingLife123
    Very few places start benefits right away. Very few. Most places don't start benefits until 90 days after hire.

    Why do you choose to see negativity at every turn in your life? I think you might have some underlying mental illness that you need to have evaluated. I'm not saying this to be harsh, but I've followed all of your posts. A lot of your thinking process does not make sense.

    You need to stop thinking about the ICU for now. You just do. Stop talking to anyone that went to nursing school with you. I had like 20 people in my cohort, I'm still the only one in icu and I started there immediately after graduation. Everyone has found their niche in nursing and icu is not the end all for everyone. Some of my classmates are in L&D, some oncology, a few at a heart hospital on the floor. There's a couple that moved to work at a very prestigious hospital in our country. Neither in icu. Some are in home health. All of my former classmates are happy. Stop thinking only icu is going to make you inherently happy.

    You need to get good nursing experience right. No matter where. You still are not grasping you were fired from an acute care position. That's going to follow you for a bit.

    Work hard at this job and give it your all. And for goodness sake, stop comparing yourself to others, and forget about your precious tech job you had. It was dumb to have that job when you are a RN.
    Trust me, I know I was let go from a highly sought after job. It's one of my biggest regrets and biggest failures. Seems like it will follow me from the rest of my life. There are probably certain jobs that are nearly unobtainable because I failed so badly there.
  12. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from purplegal
    I'm starting to think it would have been best to fail nursing school altogether. Obviously nursing is only going to be a good experience for everyone but me. No wonder I got hired at this place. Anyone who actually has a choice would in no way choose to work for an employer that pays less and withholds benefits for 2 months. I might as well be unemployed.
    Many quality employers withhold benefits for two months -- or until the end of the month after you start paying for them. Or at least, two of the major teaching hospitals I've worked for did. Once they kicked in, the benefits were actually pretty good . . . better than I thought.

    It is worth it to take the nursing job at the less favored facility in order to build your career as a nurse. I've done it. So have many others. It will pay off in the end.
  13. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from purplegal
    If my first job had worked out, I'd be making $33 or $34/hr by now. But instead of being a cardiac nurse, I get to work in a SNF for $26/hr and no benefits for 2 months. Nice....

    And chances are I'll never be a cardiac nurse again. SO many things I'll never get to do. Yep, so while everyone I know has made their way up to ICU with good pay and benefits, I get all the crap.
    I'm trying to say this kindly and helpfully, but perhaps being forthright is my particular weakness.

    Your attitude needs to change. You're very negative, you're focused on what everyone around you has that you don't have, and you cannot seem to let things go. If your first job had worked out -- but it didn't. Hopefully, you can identify why it didn't and work on changing/improving those aspects of your character and work ethic. It doesn't matter what you think everyone else has -- I'm pretty sure no one's life is as wonderful or perfect as you think it is.

    I remember when I was living on an Air Force Base with an abusive spouse. Every evening when I walked the dog, I'd walk by the other houses and glimpse through their windows all the happy families having dinner together and talking to one another. Why couldn't *I* have what they had? Why did I have to be the one in the abusive marriage? Life just did not seem fair.

    The day I moved out of that house, all of the blinds were closed in all of those other houses, yet I could occaisionally see someone peeking through the blinds, watching as my best friend and her husband helped me move my things out of that house. Two weeks later, I was in the Commissary buying groceries when one of my former neighbors walked up to me. She wanted to thank me, she said, for lighting a fire under her. When she saw me and my friends loading up the U-Haul, she realized that she, too could leave. There were fourteen other houses on my street; fourteen "happy families" I had been envying. My former neighbor told me that she and six other women had moved out in the two weeks I'd been gone. Linda's husband was abusive to their children and she got them away from him. Martha's husband was known by his buddies as the "Italian Stallion" because of all the women he slept with whenever he was away on assignment. Anna's husband spied on her constantly and ordered the men under his command to spy on her as well, he kept her on a strict allowance and "didn't allow" her to work. And so forth. Of the fourteen happy families I'd been envying, fully half were profoundly UN-happy.

    Happiness is a choice, as is resilience. It doesn't matter what life throws at you -- what matters is how you react to it. If you make up your mind to be happy, you will be. If you make up your mind to be unhappy, you will be. You might as well make up your mind to be happy -- it's a lot more fun and makes you a lot more likable of a person.

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