Would You Pray if your Patient asked? - page 4

If a patient asked you to pray with or for them at the bedside, would you? I had this discussion with some other nurses and the responses were interesting. Some said they would have no problem,... Read More

  1. by   LasVegasRN
    I am cracking up... "bless the placenta". Whew.

    I really like the direction this thread is going. It is only recently that I would have felt comfortable leading a prayer with a patient. Before, I could only participate passively as I had not discovered my spiritual self.

    I was raised Baptist, grew up in a Jewish neighborhood, and went to Catholic schools . It was actually a rabbi that taught me the value and power of prayer. Through his inspiration and a deeper appreciation for my own spirituality did I come to this point where I could very comfortably pray with a patient - any patient.

    Hey - I got one of those white new testament bibles at my pinning too! I also still have my rosary from grade school, my St. James bible from my pastor, and yes, I still have the mezuzah on my doorway that the rabbi gave me many years ago. If I move to a different place, I still follow his directions of how to hang it and the prayer you say when you place it. Life is grand! :angel2:
  2. by   kaycee
    I have (all faiths) and I will continue to.
  3. by   stevierae
    I would, and have, prayed with patients. I remember one time a Seventh Day Adventist gentleman was having a major neck dissection for cancer, and would end up with a glossectomy and laryngectomy. He asked us, the whole surgical team, to say a prayer for him before induction. When the surgery was over, and he opened his eyes and went to thank us, and no sound came out, he looke absolutely terrified before it registered in his mind that the surgery had left him without a tongue and a larynx. I was honored to be on the receiving end of his request, especially since those were the last words he would be able to verbalize, and was very glad we had done it.

    I, too, have baptized stillborn and critically ill babies; we always told the parents, and they always thanked us for thinking about doing it.
  4. by   pkmom
    I will pray with patients if they ask, but I will not pray to a god I don't believe in, I would feel like a hypocrite.
  5. by   shay
    Originally posted by Huganurse
    What difference does it make that they are a different religion than yours? You can still pray with them! All religions have a god of some sorts. Just ask them their gods name if you know they are not of your religion, then pray as usual substituting that gods name for the one you would usually use. You are praying for the recovery of your patient and if they think praying will help, it probably will, what do you have to loose? Do you really think your god will punish you for praying for someone else to that persons god? You are performing a selfless act and you are not praying for yourself.
    And here's one for ya! Who says who is right and which god is the right god? What makes any one religion the correct religion?
    Judgemental, closed minded nurses scare me!
    Anyone who is a nurse and cannot pray with/for another person for the sake of the patient is being selfish. IMO
    At the very least just pray as you normally would and don't worry about what religion they are, they in thier own mind can substitute the name of thier own god during your prayer.
    There are several prayers that are non denominational out there, ask your clergy if he or she has one they can share.

    May God Bless you all nurses!:kiss
    Gee, thanks for jumping all over me and attacking me for being honest. 'Precieate that.
  6. by   Agnus
    Yep. Will lead the prayer too if needed or expected. Any faith. It is part or total patient care. Falls under spiritual care. Very appropriate for nurses. Has nothing to do with my spiritual beliefs. Has to do with WHAT THE PATIENT NEEDS.

    I work with an RN who is a Jehova's Wittness. He gives blood to patients who need and want this treatment though it is not something he would choose for himself based on spiritual belief. He understands that we each have a right to descide and does not allow his personal beliefs to interfer with his job. Yet, our employer supports nurses who would choose not to do something like this based on religion. You see he understands he cannot stop a transfusion by refusing to do it. He could get another nurse to do it but what would be the point and that nurse might not appreciate his reason for refusal and be resentful of the added work.
    When we are takeing care of others it is inappropriate to press our values on our patients. This is not about us it is about the patient, period.
    Last edit by Agnus on Apr 27, '02
  7. by   Agnus
    Originally posted by Sleepyeyes


    PS I also sing, but only if they promise not to laugh. I then go into a rousing rendition of "This Little Light of Mine" heehee
    :chuckle We usually wind up giggling while they try to keep a straight face (yes, I'm that bad).
    mabe we should start a bad singer's choir. It is so sad when people like us love to sing and in doing so inflict pain. The world is not fair. lalalalalaaaaaaa ahem.
  8. by   ktwlpn
    I see no problem with bowing my head for a moment of silent prayer or reflection at a patient's request.I see nothing wrong with anyone refusing to do so for whatever reason provided they offer to call in the appropriate person to do so...I do have a problem with family members attempting to hold revivals at the bedside or during multidisciplinary team meetings and interfering with staff's duties.I now work in a non-secular long term care facilty and will ask a family to refrain from doing so and offer them an appropriate time and place to continue....
  9. by   CriticalCareOnc
    i will pray a non denominational prayer if the patient belongs to a religion other than my own beliefs. if we have the same religion, then i can pray with him/her according to both our own kind and way of praying... spiritual care takes a big part of the oncology nursing.
  10. by   Q.
    Huganurse:

    If you claim it doesn't make any difference what god the patient asks you to pray to, then why pray to any god at all? Why not have the patient abandon his/her beliefs and pray to the god that the nurse chooses? You made the point of which god is the correct god anyway. Exactly. A nurse should have the right to not pray "to" a specific god of a patient's choosing. I'm sorry, but religious beliefs are a personal thing and a nurse shouldn't be forced to abandon hers simply because she is a NURSE.

    I would pray WITH a patient but I would not pray "to" another god such as Budda, Allah or the sun or the trees. I am Catholic, I believe in God, the Father the Almighty, and I will not give that up or practice what I believe to be blasphemy for any patient. Bowing my head in a moment of silence, participating in a prayer, or guiding a patient through their questioning of faith is one thing IN A GENERAL SENSE. But I reserve the right to NOT pray to other gods. And I think you jumping all over Shay and attacking her belief that she only prays to her god is quite ballsy, if you will.

    My religion is just as dear to me as the patient's religion is to them.
    Last edit by Susy K on Apr 28, '02
  11. by   live4today
    originally posted by lasvegasrn
    if a patient asked you to pray with or for them at the bedside, would you?

    i had this discussion with some other nurses and the responses were interesting. some said they would have no problem, others said it was too personal a request for a patient to ask, and others said they would call the chaplain as they felt it is a chaplain function only.

    i witnessed one occurence where a patient asked his nurse to pray with him. without hesistation, she took his hand and prayed a very nice non-denominational prayer. i realize not everyone can or might not want to do this, but it really brought solace to that patient.

    your thoughts?
    yes, i would pray with any patient who asked me to.
  12. by   Ted
    Yep!
  13. by   shay
    Originally posted by Susy K
    Huganurse:

    If you claim it doesn't make any difference what god the patient asks you to pray to, then why pray to any god at all? Why not have the patient abandon his/her beliefs and pray to the god that the nurse chooses? You made the point of which god is the correct god anyway. Exactly. A nurse should have the right to not pray "to" a specific god of a patient's choosing. I'm sorry, but religious beliefs are a personal thing and a nurse shouldn't be forced to abandon hers simply because she is a NURSE.

    I would pray WITH a patient but I would not pray "to" another god such as Budda, Allah or the sun or the trees. I am Catholic, I believe in God, the Father the Almighty, and I will not give that up or practice what I believe to be blasphemy for any patient. Bowing my head in a moment of silence, participating in a prayer, or guiding a patient through their questioning of faith is one thing IN A GENERAL SENSE. But I reserve the right to NOT pray to other gods. And I think you jumping all over Shay and attacking her belief that she only prays to her god is quite ballsy, if you will.

    My religion is just as dear to me as the patient's religion is to them.
    Thanks, sus.

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