Would You Pray if your Patient asked? - page 16

If a patient asked you to pray with or for them at the bedside, would you? I had this discussion with some other nurses and the responses were interesting. Some said they would have no problem,... Read More

  1. by   Agnus
    Ah heck haven't you heard we live in an age of technology. The Gods now have telephones, computers, faxes they can use to relay messages and wrong numbers. And to top it off they have and operator that know where to direct the call.

    I think God is smart enought to figure out what to do with the prayer.
  2. by   Q.
    Originally posted by Stargazer
    Actually, "Allah" IS the same thing as God. The most user-friendly article you'll ever read on the subject: Ten Things Everyone Should Know About Islam
    I should have known that you would steer me correctly.

  3. by   Stargazer
    I got your back, babe.
  4. by   happthearts
    I feel its perfectly OK to pray with a PT a short little prayer if it gives them comfort or you can ask them if they want to talk to there clergy. I prayed everyday the Rosary with My last PT She was Catholic and I was Mormon I saw the physical comfort it gave her, when she was agitated or in pain and couldn't sleep. The other nurses were amazed that she didn't sleep on there nights and she would sleep on mine. I told them my secret. When they started doing it My Pt slept well. Do I pray with My Pt Yes I do! I have seen the great medical effect it has had on them.
  5. by   Agnus
    Happyhearts,
    I know that is a streatch for a Latter-Day Saint to pray the Rosary. How generous, loving and wise of you.
  6. by   happthearts
    Hey Angus
    Thanks for the nice comment, I just feel if it works for them that's great and I do believe like you God Knows just what to do with it. Be his name God, Allah Mother Mary or mother earth. I just see the medical effect over the years By praying. I am not what you would call a religious nut. But if someone wanted me to pray I would. My Pt just got to the point She couldn't do it for her self.

    I even knew a RN I worked with that the Pt had asked her to pray and she was an Atheists. She read from the bible and said a little prayer. She said the same thing I did if it makes them feel better Medically its better then giving them a pill when they don't really need it. Its there faith that makes them feel better.
  7. by   gambroRN
    I would be honored if a patient feels enough trust in me to ask me to pray with them.
  8. by   psychonurse
    I can remember 17 years when I was taking my RN classes, more than once I had my instructors talk to me about praying with my patients and my OB instructor taught us how to do the baptismal on a newborn when they are not doing well or stillborns. I can remember having to do that once while I was a student, I had a mother whose infant wasn't going to make it and I babtized it before it died.

    When I worked in hospitals I occasionally would pray with my patients and would sometimes pray for someone that was suffering and would ask for them to have some peace even after I got off work. I also prayed for my parents when they were dying so that they didn't have to suffer anymore.

    Now that I am working where I do, I do not pray for my clients as I think that I would probably lose my job for getting to close to them. I have never discussed this with the powers that be but I don't think that correctional nurses should pray for their patients. That could be construed as getting too emotional and getting involved with them. So for now I just say my nightly prayers about keeping my job and stop at that.
  9. by   mario_ragucci
    i enjoyed psycholnurses post very much because it introduce new vocabulary. Correctional nurse.

    f someone baptized my unborn baby I would just note what year it is. Even though it would be something intended to comfort the living, not a stillborn baby, who has no life. I don't think it is respectful of any mom to display a ritualistic behavior during such a personally tragic event. It's irreverant, and wrong. (no kidding)
  10. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by mario_ragucci
    i enjoyed psycholnurses post very much because it introduce new vocabulary. Correctional nurse.

    f someone baptized my unborn baby I would just note what year it is. Even though it would be something intended to comfort the living, not a stillborn baby, who has no life. I don't think it is respectful of any mom to display a ritualistic behavior during such a personally tragic event. It's irreverant, and wrong. (no kidding)
    How can it be irreverent to want to have your stillborn baby baptized? (she did not baptize an UNBORN baby-but a stillborn one-there is a difference)Nothing is more important to a believer then a baptism.Many find comfort in their religion during such a tragic event....Who is this "ritualistic behavior disrespectful to"? You? You may not be a particularly religious person-but many others are and this is acceptable behavior in most religions.....Now I have to ask-how many babies have you lost? How do you now what is acceptable behavior for someone going through such a thing? I sincerely want to know-what field of nursing do you wish to ultimately pursue? I think you had better pass on L&D and psych.....(no kidding)
    Last edit by ktwlpn on Oct 27, '02
  11. by   cargal
    Mario,
    As nurses we must not pass judgement or impose our values on others, but support the person wholly. Psychosocial interventions are probably our most important job as nurses. You must bury your own values or lack of and unequivically give yourself to those in need, unless they are harming themselves or others. A religious ritual is part of the grieving process for some, and those of us who are not relious can never pass judgement on something so sacred as another's religious needs and beliefs. (no kidding).
  12. by   Rosiern
    I've prayed with patients and for patients and their families on many occassions. Patients ask you to pray for and with them because they are frightened of what is going on. They believe in God, or a higher being, but it is being tested at that particular time. What better way to help and gain that patient's trust than to pray with them. It doesn't have to be set prayers, if that makes you uncomfortable. It can be very simple. When you become a nurse you take care of the whole person. That means his spiritual person also.
  13. by   mario_ragucci
    I'm not passing judgement; just displaying my own thoughts. I'm not looking at it from any religious standpoint, and what other people do is part of their own conscious. Respect is paramount to the mom, I think. So if a professional health care worker starts to recite a ritual over my dead life, well, I just think it would be better off for the mom to initiate that stuff, as opposed to a health care worker turning a sensitive, tragic event into a pland for their own ritualistic behavior.
    You know what I mean. I would just be quiet and allow the mom to cry in peace and be ensuring her safelty and health. nd to listen and comfort. Thats all. if it was a Christian mom of strong faith, who began to vocalize her feelings, of course I would pray with/for her if it's something she wanted. I would NEVER initiate anything like that though, and NEVER jump to conclusions about what are my personal beliefs and what my patient deserves as respect.
    I will support and protect my patient, and also educate. Spirituality is also important, but I would never be any way accept open ended.
    The still born , I'm imagining, is extremely painful for a mom, and I couldn't take advantage of a situation to introduce myself as a quack "person of cloth" by default if the mom is not mentioning theistic stuff.

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