Would You Pray if your Patient asked? - page 10

If a patient asked you to pray with or for them at the bedside, would you? I had this discussion with some other nurses and the responses were interesting. Some said they would have no problem,... Read More

  1. by   Rustyhammer
    As an athiest I would not even know where to begin. I have never prayed. but I surely respect the power of faith!
    -Russell
  2. by   eagleRN
    For a pt. to even trust us enough to ask to pray, is one of the biggest compliments we could ever receive. I have prayed many times with pt's, and pt's family. I have prayed over pt's dying, asking God to please take them on, instead of letting them suffer. The greatest honor I have performed as a nurse is to pray and help alleviate the fear from dying. I now work at a convalescent center, where the last stage of living happens, (death.) Sometimes all it takes it to say aloud, "Dear God, help me today, work through my heart and my hands. Thank you for entrusting me with the knowledge to take care of (pt's name.) Amen. *You can pray that silently before any pt. ask you to pray.
    Because, don't we all need that?
  3. by   micro
    Originally posted by Rustyhammer
    As an athiest I would not even know where to begin. I have never prayed. but I surely respect the power of faith!
    -Russell

    rustyhammer,
    you sound like a very caring person
    if your belief system is atheism.......i respect that
    if you want to pray with your patient(s).........you will be able to.......it is not that you have to actively seek out opportunities,
    in nursing we are in such personal spaces with our patients and their "families" that just by being yourself and offering the right word at the right time, or just a smile, or just a ............
    prayer can be specific as in a specific religion or belief system,
    but i humbly feel that in nursing, at least for myself, it is just a way of being and caring...........
    micro
    Last edit by micro on May 6, '02
  4. by   fedupnurse
    In a heart beat!
  5. by   CattiesNaNa
    I have prayed with patients in the past and felt honored that they would ask me. If you feel uncomfortable call the hospital chaplin, or offer to call the patients' minister or priest.
    CattiesNana :angel2:
  6. by   nightmoves
    I can't recall where I saw the results of this study, but patients scheduled for elective surgery at one general hospital were randomly assigned to two groups, and a local church was given a list of the patients in one group with a request for prayer. The patients in the prayer cohort did better postoperatively--sorry I don't remember the details of the study.

    And to be honest about it, I pray in the car every night on my way in to work!
  7. by   mattsmom81
    I remember an ICU patient whose family was into crystals as their source of spirituality. I thought it was interesting, and I allowed the crystals to be present , just worked around them best I could. I would do this with any religious activity as long as it doesn't become too disruptive to the unit and my care of the patient.

    If I don't understand, I politely decline from taking part in their rituals but I try not to discourage them as it is not my place.

    A coworker of mine told stories of religous artifacts hung about a patient's room which smelled horrid...I may have had a problem with that...due to the pervasive foul odors and other patients being exposed to it...but I would always involve my higher ups in any decision to limit religious ceremony for sure....
  8. by   mtgirl63
    I would consider it a blessing to be asked to pray with a patient. I have prayed with/for my residents before. One had just had a stroke, was non-responsive, and was care and comfort only. I prayed aloud so she could hear me, and when I was done praying, her breathing was more relaxed and she had tears rolling down her cheeks. So even when we think they're "unresponsive" --- well, we just might be surprised....and blessed.
  9. by   Agnus
    Originally posted by mtgirl63
    I would consider it a blessing to be asked to pray with a patient. I have prayed with/for my residents before. One had just had a stroke, was non-responsive, and was care and comfort only. I prayed aloud so she could hear me, and when I was done praying, her breathing was more relaxed and she had tears rolling down her cheeks. So even when we think they're "unresponsive" --- well, we just might be surprised....and blessed.
    Beautiful! What a testament to the power of prayer, and to the belief that hearing hangs around long past anyother sense, and that comotose patients hear us.

    I will remember this one. :kiss
  10. by   micro
    i looked into my patient's eyes last night.......she shed a tear, then i told a mild joke and she smiled and almost laughed.........

    that to this nurse kid is a prayer..........

    and as one of the great chaplains where i work wrote once........

    thanks to all the nurses here on this unit for the "comeup alongsideness" with our patients and families.........

    that is all
  11. by   zudy
    I have prayed with my pts and other nurses so often I really didn't think about until I picked up this thread! And yes, I pray with pts of other religions ,it's not like they are trying to convert me. If it helps my pts, I'm all for it. As for the singing of hymns..... one of my favorite days in ER was the day we all sang the Bible songs we had learned in childhood ( like in vacation Bible school) the pts loved it!!
  12. by   boobaby42
    I have prayed, cried, and hugged many patients when they've initiated it. I have initiated a few hugs and kisses myself, when appropriate. Mostly the kisses and hugs were for my little patient's. You can see the need in their eyes, if you look close. Especially, the ones with only hours to live. It brings you (me) closer to God. That's how it makes me feel. : ) I think it makes the patients feel that way too.
  13. by   caroladybelle
    I don't mind praying with my patients; However, as a jew in the Bible belt, there can be some doctrinal problems.

close