would you be a RN for $11.00/hr? - page 17

Just for fun lets just pretend the starting wage for an RN (regardless of education just RN) started at $11.00 hr. Would you still be a nurse? Also, what would be an acceptable starting pay for you... Read More

  1. by   oneLoneNurse
    Nope, I would have stayed in the patch.

    In retrospect that might have been a good decision.
  2. by   Ginger35
    Quote from mshellfinch
    No I would not work for $ 11.00 and hour. It has less to do with the fact that I made that as a CNA 10 years ago or that I couldn't feed my family on that, then the fact that RNs are worth more then that.

    We need to remember that we are educated professionals, we are a PROFESSION> and we should never tolerate being underpaid. We go to work everyday and are responsible for the lives we care for, we are the last line of defense between a transcription error and a patient being harmed. We are the doctors' eyes and ears. We are the ones that can make a difference between a patient recovering or getting worse.

    $11.00 an hour? NO WAY! That is inexcusable and no RN should ever work for that.
    Mshellfinch,

    I could not have said it better myself. We are a profession, yet there are those that tend to do things to undermine and degrade us as nurses and a profession. Many physicians argue that they gave up their youth to go to school and become educatated to serve the greater good and this is why they should receive the wages they get. On the other hand, people don't realize, that nurses have given up much of the same. Granted, most of us have not went on to a doctorate degree, however, look at what we do....How would a hospital operate if nurses were not there? How would physicians get the job done? $11.00 an hour is insulting!!!

    Perhaps 20-30 years ago, nurses were able to work and it didn't matter what the pay was - I don't know. However, nowdays things have changed and we have way more sick patients to be responsible for than ever. The stakes are higher now than ever and I don't see it getting any better....Currently, with the pay scale on a national level and working conditions- the risks don't outweigh the benefits!!! I don't think it is worth it to risk permanent spine injury, exposure to disease, emotional & physical abuse for say 50k - 60k annually.
    Last edit by Ginger35 on Apr 5, '07
  3. by   Scrubz
    How much you get paid should compensate how much you're doing, how much responsability is in your hands, and how stressful the job is. And since nurses are constantly on the move, hold a lot of responsbility, and since nursing can be a very, very stressful occupation at times, I think nurses should get paid more than they do. I think there are a lot of jobs out there that either pay too much or too less than what the people deserve.
  4. by   LiveLongBeProsperous
    No way, you just do not go through college and nursing school to get out and make $11.00/hr. To be willing to do so, except in a crisis, would be a show of disrespect to the nursing profession. We should not lower our standards or what we are worth to the public.
  5. by   Gromit
    Suebe, where do you work now (state) ?
    I'm in Florida (as it says on my blurb) but in another few years, plan to leave -just not really sure where. I was born and raised in this state, but don't intend to die in it. Traveled the country (well 48 states of it) while driving rigs long-haul, but never had much of an eye out for cost of living in each state. Times have changed, and so have I. The wife knows I don't want to be here for many more years and seems cool with that (was no secret before we got married).

    -

    Hospitals kiss Drs. butts because they cannot function without doctors. This is very true. But they seem to believe that WE don't realize the other part of that truth. They (doctors OR hospitals) cannot function without US.
    It always makes me suspicious when a hospital offers the moon to try to get you to come over -if conditions are so bad that they have to offer small fortunes and big promises, do I REALLY want to go there?
    Knew a few nurses that got wooed by the large facility in Orlando -two of 'em were so disgusted after a couple of months that they broke their agency contracts to leave. These were seasoned nurses, so I took their hint and filed paperwork for that facility into my 'outgoing' (garbage) bin . Never hurts to keep your eyes open, but it pays to be a little suspicious.

    -
    I just never have understood why these facilities don't just spend a little to 'fix' the problems instead of paying a lot to try to fool others into coming in to replace the ones who got fed-up with the lies. It would seem to be better (financially) in the long run if they just worked with their existing staff.
    When a staff is happy, people talk. Word of mouth travels. Others want to join. When unhappy, even the patients can tell.
    Last edit by Gromit on Mar 13, '07
  6. by   EmerNurse
    I've never worked in any job as hard as I do in mine. I usually love it. But after getting a look at my upcoming schedule (which is worse than the last one, with almost ALL the weekends, and nope I had NO input into it!!), I'm debating if it's even worth what I do make, let alone $11 bucks an hour.

    Fed up beyond belief right now. The more you do, the harder you work, the more abused you get. The slackers keep slacking and the hard workers just get more expectations heaped on them. I'm damn upset right now. Good grief just LET them ask me for a favor right now. I'll pull agency before I'll work OT for them at this point. I've HAD IT.
  7. by   lindarn
    Quote from Gromit
    Suebe, where do you work now (state) ?
    I'm in Florida (as it says on my blurb) but in another few years, plan to leave -just not really sure where. I was born and raised in this state, but don't intend to die in it. Traveled the country (well 48 states of it) while driving rigs long-haul, but never had much of an eye out for cost of living in each state. Times have changed, and so have I. The wife knows I don't want to be here for many more years and seems cool with that (was no secret before we got married).

    -

    Hospitals kiss Drs. butts because they cannot function without doctors. This is very true. But they seem to believe that WE don't realize the other part of that truth. They (doctors OR hospitals) cannot function without US.
    It always makes me suspicious when a hospital offers the moon to try to get you to come over -if conditions are so bad that they have to offer small fortunes and big promises, do I REALLY want to go there?
    Knew a few nurses that got wooed by the large facility in Orlando -two of 'em were so disgusted after a couple of months that they broke their agency contracts to leave. These were seasoned nurses, so I took their hint and filed paperwork for that facility into my 'outgoing' (garbage) bin . Never hurts to keep your eyes open, but it pays to be a little suspicious.

    -
    I just never have understood why these facilities don't just spend a little to 'fix' the problems instead of paying a lot to try to fool others into coming in to replace the ones who got fed-up with the lies. It would seem to be better (financially) in the long run if they just worked with their existing staff.
    When a staff is happy, people talk. Word of mouth travels. Others want to join. When unhappy, even the patients can tell.
    They don't work to "fix" the problems, because they don't want to. Admitting that they need nurses would give nurses power, and control, if we knew that they needed us. All it is, is an affirmation that they don't need us. And the truth is, they don't. Nurses are a dime a dozen, and there is always another warm body, in the form of either a new grad, or a foreign nurse who is willing to work. Or a "martyr mary", who thinks that patient care begins and ends with them. ABC Community college churns our new grads every six months. Increasing the entry into practice would reduce our numbers, and make us more marketable, and give us the power that PTs and OTs have. They reduced their numbers by increasing their educational requirements. The fewer of them that their are, the more money they ASK for. Not beg.

    If there was really a nursing shortage, we would command six figure salaries.
    But there is no shortage, and hence our salaries have remained flat.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  8. by   areafl
    why do people work? to make money. and people go to school to make more money and to find a profession that they enjoy. nurses are responsible for a vast array of things from patient advocate, to supervisor. they work long hard hours often with no breaks. i worked in a factory and made about $12.00 an hour with no education, no real responsibility, and i was guaranteed my breaks. so to answer the question...no i would not and i highly doubt there is a nurse out there that thinks $11.00 an hour is enough for the work they do
  9. by   caliotter3
    One of the home health agencies I worked for quoted $22/hr to me until they found out I wasn't an RN, then it went down to $17/hr. Afterwards, I found many instances where they were paying as low as $15/hr, not far from the $13/hr advertised by a competitior. Yes, there are several schools in the area that pump out new grads on a regular basis and the area is known as an entry point for the foreign grads who come in. There certainly is no shortage of nurses around here, from the overqualified to the unqualified. All of the employers take advantage of this, and place their compensation packages and offers of work accordingly. That is a major reason why you will find tons of 20 hrs a week or less job offerings and a workforce that competes for these jobs, helping to keep wages and benefits low.
  10. by   Gromit
    The poor staffing, and hospitals offering incentives to hire on (sign on bonuses being the usual) and the very fact that a facility will pay higher than wage scale to hire an agency nurse -all of these things say that yes, there IS a shortage. Our floor regularly tries to get folks to work overtime (RNs, not techs, not Unit Coordinators/secretaries, and not housekeeping or dietary folks for the cafeteria -nurses. ) by offering to pay "critical shortage incentive" pay (which is time plus .8 -a bit better than time and a half, isn't it? )
    There is DEFINATELY a shortage of RNs who are willing to work at the bedside. Yes, the schools keep pumping them out. But they are quitting (in some areas as fast as the newbies come out) in droves too. Many newbies had no idea what they were REALLY getting into, and quit within the first year -no, I don't have stats, but I do know folks from my own class who left in the first year, and I've met quite a few others who are getting ready to quit after less than a year. Lets not forget the soon-to-be-old-fartknockers out there (grin) the 'boomers' who are getting well on into their senior years -quite a few more soon-to-be-patients, and no way is the number of RNs who work bedside going to keep up with THAT.
    As you could probably tell, I'm not really worried that the jobs will dry up. The only way a hospital wouldn't need us is if the docs would actually do bedside care. Now, I'm a sick man, so please don't get me started laughing at THAT idea!
  11. by   jms79
    Whoever said that Taco Bell was paying $8 an hr for high school students isnt true for my area. I worked for taco bell I was an assistant manager. I saw the money people were making. The most some high school student were making was alittle over minimum wage. I would take a nursing job over any fast food job anyday. Because its also alot more rewarding.
  12. by   areafl
    Ok...maybe I am getting the wrong idea from the post but working at Taco Bell is a job that requires little brain activity...(not saying that in a bad way) where as nursing requires you to constantly be thinking you are responsible for your patients and your co-workers. What do you have to think about at Taco bell?? (ok I put the meat on the taco then the lettuce, tomato, followed by cheese??) You don't have to think if I put the tomato on before the lettuce will my customer die.
    Nursing would be a much more rewarding job but it is far from easier, and that is why nurses should be compensated.

    (I hope I don't sound b!tchy...)
  13. by   SueBee RN-BSN
    I live in the midwest now.

    Nurses are seen as door mats, because too many nurses allow themselves to be treated poorly. How many times have you, or have seen another nurse spoken to like dirt by a doctor? Only to walk away hurt, but saying it dosen't bother them. We all say that doctor has the problem, but what it really is- abuse, and it causes a hostile workplace. Nurses have allowed this to happen to the porfession.

    Nurses also abuse each other, and are very good at doing so. I can remember some first days on the job, being assigned a preceptor, and being ignored by that preceptor. I can remember having very sick patients, getting worse by the minute, and other nurses refusing to help out with me having to leave the bedside to call for help. I can remember delivering a baby with another nurse standing behind me with her arms crossed and lips purched. Real professional. Not to mention the back biting, and pure trash like ways some nurses use to make themselves feel like they are worth something. How sad, but nurses have allowed this to happen.

    I don't know about you all, but I did not go to school for 4 years, with a caring heart for others just to be treated like dirt.

    I think it's time to put hospitals, doctors and other nurses on notice. Their negative behavior will not be tolerated.

    I saw a doctor shove a nurse out of her chair in the PACU one day. Her butt hit the floor, and she just walked away. I went over to that doctor, and told him that if her ever treated me that way he would have a nightmare of legal problems. I also went from the nurse manager to the hospital CEO. This doctors behavior changed. It felt so good. All nurses have to do is stick together, and standup for themselves. It is really that simple. Nurses can make this happen.

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