Would like to know what you think about Sustainable English

  1. 0
    Hello! I would just like to know what the nursing community thinks about Sustainable English.

    I am an English communications consultant and currently work with international corporations in IT, outsourcing, and finance. My work involves training and coaching native English speakers to the difficulties non-native speakers have when they communicate. I provide effective English communication skills and train native English speakers to create a communication-friendly environment. At the core of my work lies Sustainable English - the productive use of English to cultivate relationships.

    My questions are: As nurses, do you think there would be any interest in this type of training for you? Do you have any difficulties or feel frustrated when you communicate with non-native English speakers?

    I thank you for your time and any insight you could offer.
    Last edit by SteveNNP on Jul 23, '08 : Reason: removed link to business website per site TOS

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  2. 10 Comments...

  3. 1
    I was going to reply until I noticed this at the very bottom.

    " Last edited by SteveRN21 : Today at 11:47 AM. Reason: removed link to business website per site TOS"


    This is a nursing related discussion board. Please spam somewhere else.
    canoehead likes this.
  4. 1
    My questions are: As nurses, do you think there would be any interest in this type of training for you? Yes.

    Do you have any difficulties or feel frustrated when you communicate with non-native English speakers? Yes.


    ...which is why there are many nursing researchers working in this arena. That is, researchers who are not "IT, outsourcing, and finance;" researchers who actually have a clue as to what we do and what we deal with.

    The last thing that nursing and health care need these days is another entrepreneur who thinks that patient care is just business with living product.

    If you really think it can make the transition from business to nursing, contact a researcher, hospital or univeristy. But you better have a ton of data that say something other than, "It makes money."
    talaxandra likes this.
  5. 1
    I apologize because I have clearly offended some people and broke the forum rules by adding my website under my name.

    It was a careless mistake on my part and I realized it only after I finished making lunch for my daughters. I had copied and pasted my original post from a communications forum for professionals, which allows contact information in posts. I was in a hurry and it did not occur to me that I had made a mistake.

    Please accept my sincere apologies.
    Last edit by sirI on Jul 23, '08 : Reason: removed name
    barbyann likes this.
  6. 0
    Thanks for the feedback, MNC RN.

    To reply to your response, I would just like to add that my original degree lies in Human Development with a focus on gerontology. On my advisory board, I have linguistic researchers and a professor of gerontology in the department of health and community services at Cal State University, Chico.

    I am not "...another entrepreneur who thinks that patient care is just business with living product."

    My main drive is not money...it is to help native English speakers communicate effectively and strive for empathy, self-awareness, and sensitivity when they communicate with non-native speakers.

    What you are implying is surly stereotypical.
    Last edit by sirI on Jul 23, '08 : Reason: removed name
  7. 6
    It looks like this thread is going to end up being locked anyway, but I will add my 0.02 worth. First of all, I am not really sure what you are talking about. Are you asking if we as nurses need to be more aware of the needs of people who don't speak English? If so, no, we don't, We have to be aware of many differences in culture, dialects. personalities, reactions to illnesses, anger, psych problems, etc. So language is just one more problem we deal with on a daily basis.

    I have never heard the term "Sustainable English" before and on the surface it sounds like learning enough English to get by, sort of like learning a little conversational Spanish, French, etc before taking a trip to another country.

    Now for the non politically correct portion of my comment. If someone comes to this country to live, work, have their children in school, shop in the stores, vote in elections, drive on the roads....then they need to learn the language of the country they are living in. In this case it is English. I would never go to another country and expect to have translators in schools, hospitals, be able to vote in their elections, and have instructions for everything from surgical consents to cooking rice a roni in my native language! It would never be done or tolerated!

    Still, I don't know what you are asking, but I feel better for venting!
    MrsAmesRN, Jessy_RN, noc4senuf, and 3 others like this.
  8. 0
    I was not entirely clear in that I would like to know if you, as nurses, as experts in your own field, experience problems due to:

    - Language Barriers

    Could your work be enhanced if you, as native English speakers, had specific skills and techniques to facilitate communication in English in order to decrease the language barrier?

    Sustainable English is effective English when a native English speaker must communicate in English with a non-native speaker. It is a consistent, creative, and applied approach.

    I agree with your point-of-view in terms of integrating into society. I struggled with French for 6 years before I was fluent enough to "integrate" into French society and be accepted.

    My point is, native English speakers can be compassionate and have effective communication skills when they communicate with non-native speakers. I am sure the majority of non-native speakers have English classes and believe me, they struggle like hell.

    Why not help them with clear English...especially in a situation when you must take care of them in a hospital?
  9. 0
    I think this type of program would help nurses. However, a bigger problem is those who have been living in this country for YEARS and never bothering to learn English. I have a real problem with that.
  10. 1
    In the US, we are required to provide translator services if someone does not speak English or well enough to sign a legal document, etc.

    Sustainable English as you call it would not be valid in any hospital here in most cases. Trying to get someone to communicate in a language that they are not familiar with as much as they should be when they are ill is not a good thing and can get them more stressed.

    I easily communicate with patients that do not speak English or any of the other languages that I am able to deal with, and it has never been an issue for me. But trying to get them to use English when they are not comfortable with it will only make things worse in my opinion and can lead to serious misinterpretations that could become quite dangerous for the patient.
    BBFRN likes this.
  11. 0
    Thank you, Suzanne4, for taking time to explain to me how native to non-native interactions work. I understand better now.

    Each profession has its common practices. I am happy to hear that the patient's well-being and health come first. So, you are able to communicate with non-native speakers either in English or another language, but if they have difficulty expressing themselves in English, you do not force the language upon them. You contact a translator.

    Are there translators on call in the hospital? Do you hire a translating service (a third-party provider) or do you use a competent person who speaks the language in the hospital?

    You were correct, in my opinion, by saying, "But trying to get them to use English when they are not comfortable with it will only make things worse in my opinion and can lead to serious misinterpretations that could become quite dangerous for the patient." Your sentence touched me. If only the same attitude existed in the business world.

    I have seen English being forced upon non-native speakers in different companies and believe me, their well-being and productivity suffer a lot. There are serious misinterpretations and misunderstandings. But, it is too expensive to retain the services of a translator all the time, so non-native speakers struggle and often feel frustrated by the "English imposition".

    Now, I totally agree with Babs0512. If you live and work in a country, I think you must make an effort to learn the language and integrate. However, if you are in an environment in which English is used recklessly, inappropriately, and in an insensitive manner, than people's well-being are at stake.


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