Work Ethics (Warning Rant Included)

  1. Does other's people's work ethics bother you. Lately I've found myself getting infuriated at my coworkers. For instance, one nurse called in "tired", "I've been running around all day, I'm going to take a nap and come in about four hours late". The same nurse had her assignment switched from one day to the next with good reason, and decided to leave the unit short staffed and went home because she didn't like her assignment. (It's very very hard to get fired these days, must be counseled and written up a hundred times).

    Another nurse has a low priority for antibiodics and meds. She just leave the meds at the bedside uninfused. Plus she lies. I despise lying.

    Another CNA saw she was floating. While I was counting narcs she called the staffing office with a sudden onset of illness and went home.

    I give 110% and more, and work like a fool getting my job done, while providing leadership and patient care, and only call in sick when sick (which has been over a year ago). These people can't even muster up 10%.

    I hope I'm not sounding "holier nurse than thou".

    What bothers me, is the guy I'm precepting is choosing loosers for role models and has said things like "well, no one else charts that way, why should I" "when I get off orientation I'm not doing all that work".

    I should just live and let live, concentrate on myself and my work and not worry about others. The overwhelming majority of nurses I work with kick butt and work hard. But I'm get so seething angry sometimes at this dead weight.

    Thanks for letting me vent.
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   nakitamoon
    thirdshiftguy,,,, First nice to meet you~~~

    I am dealing with the same problems on a day to day basis,,, & it is driving me crazy,,, As DON of an assisted living facility,, I try to keep my direct care staff working at 90,,, to 100% I give 110 / 150% myself,,,,

    The other departments,,, and some of my employees feel giving 25% (and that is on a good day) is acceptable,,, it isn't~~~~

    I have racked my brains,,, to fix this problem,,, I haven't had luck so far,,,, lead by example,,, huh,,, they just sit and let you do the work,,,,

    The biggest problem I face,, is I really can't relate to the work ethic,,, I never had a job I didn't give at least 100% to,,, take pride in my work,,, and I just don't understand anyone doing less,, especially in our field,,,,

    I am at my wit's end,,,, write them up?,,, they will walk out,,, the next person worse,,, is known problems better than unknown????

    If I hear one more time,,, 'that's not my job',,, or 'I am not dealing with that _____ anymore",,,,, My god ppl,, they are all here for a reason,,, they need our help,,,, that is why we have a job!

    I have about 7 employees,,, CNA'S,,, Nurses,,, I would love to clone,,,, My job would be so much easier,,,, they too have voiced to me,,, how difficult it is to carry out thier duties,,, around the other employees,,,,,, How do I keep the good ones motivated,,,

    Another problem I face is,,,the home office,, will and has kept long term,,, staff who's performance leaves a lot to be desired,, when someone see's that,,,, again,, where is the motivation to do your best,,,,,,,

    Thanks for giving me the opportunity to vent to,,,, Don't have the answers,,, but have the problem,,,,

    If someone has suggestions,,, please,,, I am willing to take any advice!!

    ~kitamoon
  4. by   sjoe
    These are all management problems.

    There are many, many books out on leadership skills and managing people, on accountability, motivation, etc. There is even a "Managing for Dummies," if you are looking for a place to start. Many community colleges, universities, and some private companies offer management training courses, etc.

    The key is the component singularly lacking in all of the the many nursing environments I have experienced--LEADERSHIP. (Which also happens to be the name of Rudy Giuliani's now book.)

    Poorly run facilities promote their people to supervisory positions without providing adequate or suitable leadership or management training. One who accepts this kind of position therefore needs to obtain the training on his/her own, and if this is not done, will only experience increasing frustration and/or burnout, and will in the process pick up a well-deserved reputation for being a b*tch.

    On the other hand, after he/she does acquire more training, the overall absence of leadership and vision in the organization itself (be it at the home office or locally) become just that more obvious, so that in itself creates frustration. But at least by then some tools have been learned to better deal with it. Or to realize that it is not going to change and to deal with THAT.

    IMHO
    Last edit by sjoe on Nov 1, '02
  5. by   Flo1216
    Just out of curiosity....do you rant to the DON the way you are ranting here? You should. If I were in charge, these people would be so fired. Or else I would find another place to work.
  6. by   Sleepyeyes
    The guy you're precepting needs to be reminded that he's not charting for the facility--he's charting to cover his own butt in the eyes of the State and the BON.

    Many times I've gone the extra mile --not because of facility policy, but because it was a requirement of my license.

    So when someone would say, "I'm not doing that," I'd respond, act nonchalant and say, "Fine; you're the one who has to answer to the Board for it, not me."

    I found it easier to survive if I just did my own thing and pretty much ignored the others' work, unless I got a lot of backup from my DON===and you probably won't get that on 3rd shift, because most nursing homes revolve around day shift.
  7. by   KARRN3
    BOY DOES THIS ALL SOUND TOO FAMILIAR. THE "WORKS WELL UNDER CONSTANT SUPERVISION AND WHEN CORNERED LIKE A RAT IN A TRAP WORK ETHIC." A FEW PEOPLE WITH A LOUSY WORK ETHIC ARE LIKE A PLAGUE THAT CONTAMINATES EVERYONE ELSE. WHY DO I HAVE TO DO IT IF SHE DOESN'T,I CAN CALL IN SICK WITH NO NOTICE BECAUSE I SAW SO AND SO DO IT LAST WEEK.IF PEOPLE SEE SOMEONE ELSE DOING LESS, IT MAKES THEM THINK THEY CAN DO LESS TOO.PEOPLE RISE TO THE LEVEL OF EXPECTATION, JUST BECAUSE OF THE SHORTAGE DOESN'T MEAN STANDARDS CAN BE LET TO SLIDE, BECAUSE IT'S THE PATIENTS THAT SUFFER.MANAGEMENT NEEDS TO REALIZE THAT ALLOWING EVEN ONE OR TWO OF THESE SLACKERS TO STAY DECREASES JOB PERFORNANCE FOR EVERYONE.AND THIS FROM A STAFF PERSON.
  8. by   Sleepyeyes
    Dear Krrn3,

    Welcome to the board! I enjoy reading your posts, but I thought you should know that if you write in all capital letters, it means you are shouting when writing on the Internet. Some people might think you are rude and might not answer politely as a result.

    Please keep posting! I would've private messaged you to tell you this, but your button wasn't there.... i dunno why...
  9. by   l.rae
    Ok...just a thought.....how many of those lazy workers are just plain burned out?...In the climate of nursing today, l find it more and more difficult to go above and beyond..no one EVER says thank you when you come in sick...mostly complain if you don't pull your weight...l am all for doing a great job..for myself and for my patients...tired of sacrificing my time, family and health for management who never seem to acknowlege and promote...l will defanately conceed that there are some staff that are just plain lazy....and most of time they are "friends" with the powers that be....does that make me want to give more that 100%?...NOT!....just some different thoughts here.......LR
  10. by   legsmalone
    3rdshift, I can't believe this guy you are precepting is telling you those things. Does your facility have a failsafe for new hires, the type of thing where if the preceptor doesn't feel the nurse is ready, they don't come off orientation? I know a hospital I worked at as a CNA had a problem with a new nurse (who unfortunately graduated from my school ) that was pulling some of the same s***, very lazy, wasn't wrong about ANYTHING, and constantly putting her patients at risk with serious med errors. She was a liability to the hospital, so back on very tight preceptor orientation she went....and failed, commited another serious med error when she flip flopped IV antibiotics on two patients, and one got a medication they were allergic to. Did it while he preceptor was on the phone with an MD, because she "could handle herself and her nursing responsiblities." Scary, scary.
    And if there is anything I have learned about my charting, it is all about CYA, cover your a**, cause other nurses, doctors and the hospital sure won't.
  11. by   Tweety
    Thanks everyone for listening. To the Devil's Advocate, I hear you, there are times, I'm so tired and burned out that I can't emotionally and physically be there 100%, but the point being that I try. Ranting and raving and holding my peers hostage and then abandoning them because I don't like my assignment is not appropriate behavior.

    In these days of nursing shortages and fear of being accused of being racist (not an issue because the people I speak of are not minority, but it quietly seems to be an issue, but we won't go there), it seems management does have to put up with a lot.

    I like the response "It's you who has to answer to the state board, not me". And yes, my preceptee's orientation has been extended much to his dismay.

    It is good to know that most people out there are wonderful.
  12. by   aus nurse
    sjoe hit the nail on the head I think....it all comes down to management.

    If nurses feel appreciated and valued then they put more into their work performance. Nurses burn out when they feel undervalued and are treated as a warm body. I speak from experience. In this day and age of increasing workloads and accountability, nurses need to be appreciated. In my old place of employment, we used to bend over backwards to accomodate any management requests...because they responded when we requested something. It was a 2 way street. Now, noone tries at all, coz there is never any appreciation of the extra effort or work performance. It is solely the reason I left that establishment, after many years.

    Leadership means valuing your staff and asking for their input on policy decisions.
    Of course there will always be lazy nurses, but I think these are definetely in the minority.
  13. by   sanakruz
    sjoe and aus nurse- Yeppers-lack of leadership and good management are certainly what ails me.I'm the only nurse ( and an LVN) at a small rural outpatient mental health clinic. The clinical director is a politician, the deputy directors chair is empty, as is the bookkeeper, two clerical staff, office manager, and a full time clinician for adult services. (This is what the county has alotted us too not what in reality would be efficient)By default, guess who's doing the deputy directors job as well as her own and reining in 3 docs all over 70? I'm ready to grieve it to the union. Litterally no one is watching and the clinicians are pulling "It's not my job Im busy I dont know how to make copies answer the phone file
    take a crisis call" Didnt Woody Allen once say " It has the body of a crab and the head of a social worker?"

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