Wording for a resignation letter?

  1. 0
    Hi everyone!

    I need to quit my per diem hospital job. Now that I am doing school nursing full time, it's just too much for me. I gave it a try doing both, but so be it.

    My question is this... I want to send in my resignation letter on Monday. I am not on the schedule for the next 2 weeks. Since I started working full time, I only do 2 weekend shifts a month at the hospital. So, in my letter, do I say that I am giving my 2 weeks notice, even though I'm not on the schedule during that time? I worked today, and I'd like it to be my last shift there. How do I word it? I still want to be on good terms, so that I can get a good reference if I ever need it.

    Thanks!
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  3. 20 Comments so far...

  4. 8
    I would seriously reconsider resigning from a PRN job to go to nursing school. If it were me, I would find out what the absolute minimum number of hours I have to do a month to stay on payroll and do those hours. In this job market new grads are having a horrible time getting in to jobs. Even if you do one shift a month with this hospital it will keep your connection with them open. You may need that connection when you graduate if the market does not turn around. Really, even in school you can pull a shift or two a month to keep this bridge.
  5. 1
    Quote from TakeTwoAspirin
    I would seriously reconsider resigning from a PRN job to go to nursing school. If it were me, I would find out what the absolute minimum number of hours I have to do a month to stay on payroll and do those hours. In this job market new grads are having a horrible time getting in to jobs. Even if you do one shift a month with this hospital it will keep your connection with them open. You may need that connection when you graduate if the market does not turn around. Really, even in school you can pull a shift or two a month to keep this bridge.
    No, I'm not going to nursing school. I work full time *as* a school nurse. The per diem job is just extra.
    hiddencatRN likes this.
  6. 4
    2 weeks notice is 2 weeks notice -- it doesn't matter if you're on the schedule during that 2 weeks or not. I wouldn't mail the letter, I'd walk it in to HR and to your direct manager -- that way you know exactly when they got it.

    Make it short and sweet, "Dear __________ I am hereby giving notice that I am resigning my position effective two weeks from today, or February 20, 2012. Sincerely, Tina RN"
    somedaypeds, joanna73, Tina, RN, and 1 other like this.
  7. 0
    Thanks, noahsmama! That's exactly the wording I was looking for, and I'm going to use it word-for-word. I was so fuzzy minded after my shift yesterday, I couldn't figure out how to say it! LOL
  8. 3
    Quote from noahsmama
    2 weeks notice is 2 weeks notice -- it doesn't matter if you're on the schedule during that 2 weeks or not. I wouldn't mail the letter, I'd walk it in to HR and to your direct manager -- that way you know exactly when they got it.

    Make it short and sweet, "Dear __________ I am hereby giving notice that I am resigning my position effective two weeks from today, or February 20, 2012. Sincerely, Tina RN"
    I'll 2nd this response, if you're certain that you can't continue the present schedule. However, keep in mind always to leave doors open wherever you go; one never knows when they might come in handy. Best wishes on all of your future endeavors.
    Meriwhen, joanna73, and Tina, RN like this.
  9. 3
    Consider also saying "thank you for the opportunity" or something to that effect, before you sign off. It doesn't hurt, especially since you want to remain on positive terms.
    Amanda.RN, Tina, RN, and Meriwhen like this.
  10. 2
    "Thank you for the opportunity to work at XXX, it has been an educational and worthwhile experience for me. Please accept my resignation effective x/y/z/. Yours truly, RN
    Tina, RN and Meriwhen like this.
  11. 3
    You definitely want to list the positive attributes of working in the position, and the reason for resigning. Don't walk into HR ,and state "I am officially resigning as of today" without reasonable cause or some form of explanation. It's okay for businesses to terminate "just cause", but an individual in this fickle economy needs to be a lot more careful in their decision making.

    HR,

    I would like to formally submit my resignation notice effective _____. Due to an unhealthy professional & academic balance, which is presently interfering with my academic goals, I am no longer able to maintain my per diem shift with this organization.
    I have enjoyed working with your organization, and have benefited from my experience here. If anything should change in the
    future, I am hopeful your organization will reconsider employment opportunities. .......Thank ______,RN(LPN)
  12. 1
    Thanks, all!

    Yes, I will definitely thank them for the opportunity. I have worked there nearly 2 years. Really, the only reason why I'm leaving is that I ended up getting the school job full time. With 2 little kids at home and a house to run, even those 2 shifts a month were starting to get to me. I already feel more relaxed, knowing that my weekends will be free.
    exnavygirl-RN likes this.


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