Will Nurses Become Extinct?

  1. I am an RN who left nursing over a year ago. To make a long story short, I was very unhappy and didn't want to become a martyr for the cause. I decided to change what I could and walked away.

    Alot of nurses talk about how shortages come and shortages go... However, many believe this one is different and that it will be the most severe ever. I share this belief because I know that many people with whom I entered the profession 5 years ago looked around and said "Oh no, this will never do and I'm out of here ASAP." This is the 21st century and most US-born, bright, educated and talented people (women included) expect--at least-- a humane work environment.

    Many nurses also believe this shortage to be to their advantage, but is it really? If it is as bad as predicted, won't it be to the benefit of the corporations? They'll either import nurses, lower the bar, or do away with us. With the current corporate-centered political climate, this makes it even more to the advantage of the corporation. Bush won't even let airline workers strike...

    I invested alot of hope in California's legislation re: staffing levels and just read that the implementation has been pushed back an entire year. I strongly suspect it will never be implemented.

    Yes, I'm stirring the pot. It's my nature. I just want to hear what others think.


    [This message has been edited by chigap (edited April 07, 2001).]
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   oramar
    For the first time in my life I am questioning some of the fundamental nursing tenents that I have always believed in as far as nursing is concerned. I am actually questioning whether it is even worth it to have a licensed. In our area there are several court cases going on that seem to be scapegoating someone who has a license. In one case the only licensed person in the PCH was an LPN overseeing 100 patients with several NA in the building on nightshift. There was an incident which resulted in a death and of course they go straight to the only licensed person and find criminal neglect. In another case there was a death but no licensed person in the building and there was no body to blame. That case was called an accident. If there had been a licensed person in the second case they would almost surly had found blame. What good is a license if it just allows managment to duck responsibility and push a licensed person up front and say, "it is her fault".
  4. by   mustangsheba
    Interesting comment, Oramar. I have another friend who refuses to get a license in counseling because of the scrutiny and the fact that the licensed person is the one they go after. What else is there that we value as much?
  5. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by oramar:
    For the first time in my life I am questioning some of the fundamental nursing tenents that I have always believed in as far as nursing is concerned. I am actually questioning whether it is even worth it to have a licensed. In our area there are several court cases going on that seem to be scapegoating someone who has a license. In one case the only licensed person in the PCH was an LPN overseeing 100 patients with several NA in the building on nightshift. There was an incident which resulted in a death and of course they go straight to the only licensed person and find criminal neglect. In another case there was a death but no licensed person in the building and there was no body to blame. That case was called an accident. If there had been a licensed person in the second case they would almost surly had found blame. What good is a license if it just allows managment to duck responsibility and push a licensed person up front and say, "it is her fault".
    My first thought was...why would a LPN allow herself to be charged with the care of 100 PTS??? That is waaaaaay to many folks to be the only licensed person in the building, I don't care how many aides she had with her!

    Sorry, I don't believe nurses will ever be extinct. Everyday I'm contacted by new nurses, and students trying to get in nurses programs, that STILL have waiting lists. I'm in a hospital now, that used to use unlicensed people, and they're now going back to LPNs, and using agency...again.

    Brownie

  6. by   snappy
    I do not believe nurses will ever become extinct, although I do question the future of nursing do to the large importing of nurses from countries where nurses hardly speak english and their training may be less than American standards. I also am a little uneasy about the amount of nurses leaving the profession, yes they can be replaced but can their experience?
  7. by   oramar
    Originally posted by Brownms46:
    My first thought was...why would a LPN allow herself to be charged with the care of 100 PTS??? That is waaaaaay to many folks to be the only licensed person in the building, I don't care how many aides she had with her!


    Brownie

    In Pennsylvania Personal Care Homes or Residential Care Homes are not required to have licensed people in the building period. Matter of fact they are hardly regulated at all. However some of them charge more and advertise 24 hour nursing supervision. They do not tell people that this is one LPN for 100 people. Your right, I would not accept an assignment like this but somepeople do. Like I say it just gives managment and law inforcement a scapegoat.
  8. by   Mijourney
    Hi. If I gave up the practice of nursing in the near future, it would have more to do with the needlessly fast pace of taking care of human life, and the fact that boomers seem to have greater needs and desires and are more demanding then our parents.

    Boomers and the overly capitalistic economy control the work environment of today and are wearing me out!

    I agree that we will probably see an increase in the use of nurses from other countries (we've had immigration for centuries in the U.S.); we will also eventually see more computers and use of robotics at the bedside.



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