Will I Find Another Nursing Job?

  1. I quit my job a week ago without a notice! I worked on a horrible tele(= everything else) floor, and had no energy to look for another job while I was working! called my NM on my day off and left message I was not returning back to work, she called back to ask if this was a 2 week notice or immediate resignation, I said it was immediate...NOW i WISH I SAID IT'S 2 WEEKS BECAUSE EVERYWHERE I APPLIED THEY ASK FOR REFERENCES(MY MANAGER'S NAME AND PHONE#!!!!) WILL I GET BAD REFERENCES BECAUSE OF THIS? WILL ANYONE HIRE ME AGAIN?
    I know this was a harsh decision, but I HAD to do it to keep sane!!! Things were so bad on this floor, nurses would cry almost every evening(including me)!!! Staffing was horrible, considering the patient load and acuity...I could not/would not stand it anymore!!! We were asked every evening if we could stay for nights(or would get mandated) so we could admit more patients on the floor....I like nursing, but I would like to see patients get better and get the care they deserve, instead of feeling like I am walking the line everyday....Is it too much to ask?
    Still worried i may not be able to find another job, tough....
    Please someone reply? Has this happened to you?:uhoh21:
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  2. 21 Comments

  3. by   Jules A
    Of course you will find another job but it will probably be harder than if you had a decent reference from your last employer. Many places won't give references for legal reasons and will only confirm your dates of employment so hopefully your old job is one of those places. Could you call your former manager, apologize and explain that you were just under so much stress etc.?

    I would also think about the way you left things. It sounds like it was a horrible situation but quitting without notice is really harsh in my opinion. Not only do you lose professional credibility but your patients suffer from staffing problems and you said it was already a bad situation. I'm not saying anyone should stay at a job where they are miserable just that being responsible and finishing your obligations goes a long way. Two weeks is not a huge amount of time in the big picture. Burning bridges is never a good idea and in this business it can be a fatal error. Good luck to you.
  4. by   Epona
    Hi. Sorry to hear things were so bad. Looking back, I prolly would have given a two week notice. It may prove hard to get references from this head nurse now. Yikes! Oh well.. we do what we have to do at the time. You did what you thought you had to do, so you can't look back. Move forward and have good thoughts!!



    Good luck!
  5. by   traumaRUs
    Sorry things were so bad. Several factors will influence you in how easily you get another job:

    1. How long was this job? If less than one year, you can legitimately say it wasn't a good fit.

    2. How much experience do you bring to your new job?

    3. What is your educational background? Can you say you are looking for a more challenging position?
  6. by   needrn
    Quote from Jules A
    Of course you will find another job but it will probably be harder than if you had a decent reference from your last employer. Many places won't give references for legal reasons and will only confirm your dates of employment so hopefully your old job is one of those places. Could you call your former manager, apologize and explain that you were just under so much stress etc.?

    I would also think about the way you left things. It sounds like it was a horrible situation but quitting without notice is really harsh in my opinion. Not only do you lose professional credibility but your patients suffer from staffing problems and you said it was already a bad situation. I'm not saying anyone should stay at a job where they are miserable just that being responsible and finishing your obligations goes a long way. Two weeks is not a huge amount of time in the big picture. Burning bridges is never a good idea and in this business it can be a fatal error. Good luck to you.

    Thanks, Jules A! I think I will call my former NM and explain the situation, hopefully she'll be understanding...and maybe not give me a horrible reference!!!.... Although she did try to accomodate me by putting me on a diffrent shift, I just did not have the guts to tell her that working on the floor is pure hell!! (I think she knew that already!!!)
    I think the last draw was coming home after an exrtemely bad night and being pressured to quit by my husband who hated seeing me stressed out and miserable every day....and who thinks I can get another job anywhere just like that!!! I wonder???!!!
  7. by   needrn
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Sorry things were so bad. Several factors will influence you in how easily you get another job:

    1. How long was this job? If less than one year, you can legitimately say it wasn't a good fit.

    2. How much experience do you bring to your new job?

    3. What is your educational background? Can you say you are looking for a more challenging position?
    I was in this job for little more than a year, and I knew for a while that it was not a good fit for me. I tried to stay for financial reasons(my son just started college). I tried transferring to different departments twice, and twice I was stopped by my nurse manager. She wanted to know if I was trying to leave the floor. I did not have the guts to say that I had a hard time working on her floor, and said I need to work a different shift instead, which she was ready to accomodate, as long as stayed. I guess I should have been upfront with her, except that now I felt that I should stay because she was so accomodating. I have an Associate Degree in Nursing and an Associate Degree in Business Administration. I have a background in business/finance. I would like to find a job in case management or something on that line.
  8. by   Jules A
    I think thats a good plan and I hope she is receptive. All you can do is try, right? Best of luck in finding a wonderful job. Please keep us posted. Jules
  9. by   IMustBeCrazy
    Generally I think giving notice is the best idea in most situations. But I don't agree with calling the ex NM and sucking up. I guarantee she knew EXACTLY what was going on in her unit, and didn't/couldn't do anything about it for any one of a million reasons which I'm sure sound great to administration. You need to make peace with the decision you made and move forward.

    As nurses, we preach to our patients every day about taking care of themselves including interventions and rationales. Who looks out for us? NO ONE EXCEPT OURSELVES. If you remain such a basket case after work that you can't unwind at home, how can this possibly be good for your health? Sometimes "you gotta do what you gotta do." Look at it this way, you didn't endanger patients and you at least told her beforehand, you didn't just not show up. There is this thing called registry, I'm quite sure your NM has heard about it. Let it go and move on.
  10. by   slinkeecat
    I can sympathize w/ you and the horrible job, HOWEVER.....
    Quitting like that w/ no notice is a very unprofessional thing to do. I understand that you felt stressed. You had an opportunity to tell your Nurse manager why you felt the need to leave abruptly. She may not have been aware of the problems and you could have been the voice for yourself and your co-workers...
    I am in no way "judging" you, I just think that you made a rash decision that you could have handled better.
  11. by   slinkeecat
    oh, and yes you will get another job.... The need for nurses is endless. Good luck to you finding a dream job....
  12. by   IMustBeCrazy
    Nursing is one of a billion jobs that people like us do every day. Every day, people quit jobs without a 2 week notice for a variety of reasons. There is no glory in being a nursing martyr or any other martyr for that matter.

    I believe in most situations you SHOULD give notice. However, when a unit is so poorly managed that staff are being run literally into the ground, enough is enough and all bets are off. When those same nursing managers/administration have enough integrity to help in the trenches then that is one thing. But when all you get is lip service and Disney mentality, do more with less, work this extra shift because it's mandated -- every day -- it's time to vote with your feet.

    You are not being a 'good girl' to anyone by staying in such a patently dangerous/unhealthy situation - one that you did not make. I say this again -- YOU DID NOT CREATE THIS SITUATION. Professionalism cuts both ways.
  13. by   augigi
    I'd just get a statement from my previous employer as to how long I worked there. I may tell a prospective employer that there was a difference of opinion about patient safety as to why I didn't get a reference from that DON. There are so many jobs for nurses, I truly believe you'll get a great chance soon.
    Last edit by augigi on Sep 30, '06
  14. by   Jules A
    Quote from IMustBeCrazy
    Generally I think giving notice is the best idea in most situations. But I don't agree with calling the ex NM and sucking up. I guarantee she knew EXACTLY what was going on in her unit, and didn't/couldn't do anything about it for any one of a million reasons which I'm sure sound great to administration. You need to make peace with the decision you made and move forward.

    As nurses, we preach to our patients every day about taking care of themselves including interventions and rationales. Who looks out for us? NO ONE EXCEPT OURSELVES. If you remain such a basket case after work that you can't unwind at home, how can this possibly be good for your health? Sometimes "you gotta do what you gotta do." Look at it this way, you didn't endanger patients and you at least told her beforehand, you didn't just not show up. There is this thing called registry, I'm quite sure your NM has heard about it. Let it go and move on.

    WOW, it is so rare that I am speechless, lol.

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