Why nurses don't want to talk to a ward psychologist? - page 4

Hello, Since I often seek and get good information at this forum I had an idea I can ask you for help with my current issue. I am a psychologist working in a pediatric ICU. I am there mostly for... Read More

  1. by   Purple_roses
    Quote from MelEpiRN
    I know many would disagree with me, (which would make me happy, to be honest) but I think it's also a culture of the current workforce. I organize educational opportunities (many offer CE credit) as part of my job as well as community outreach programs and I get almost zero participation. The only time people show up is if you make it super-mandatory (uh-huh, I said it- mandatory doesn't mean diddly anymore) and pay them. You'd think nurses would want to learn, keep up to date with new info, etc, but in my experience people just want to come in, do the job they're [under]paid for, and go home. No extra, even if it helps them.
    To an extent, yes, this is true for me. While I do want to learn, I absolutely expect to be paid for my time, so if something is going to be mandatory, I'll be getting paid for it. Every nurse works hard for every single penny they earn and most are probably underpaid, and we should all respect ourselves enough to know it’s only right for our employer to pay us for coming in for anything. You bet I'm not stepping foot in the hospital if I'm not getting paid.

    That being said, I do look things up on my own at home. While in a t-shirt and undies all snuggled up on my bed with my cat and a bowl of ice cream.
    Last edit by Purple_roses on Nov 3
  2. by   Cat365
    I would never and I mean never seek help from my employer or anything connected to my employer. In fact I don't even have a family doctor right now because I can't figure out where to get one that isn't connected to a hospital which either does or might potentially employ me. Call me paranoid but I work in a hospital I know exactly how easy it is to view medical records.

    I don't even have any diagnosed mental issues and I'm that paranoid. Sorry, I think the idea is a great one, but I wouldn't trust you either.
  3. by   pixierose
    Quote from MelEpiRN
    I know many would disagree with me, (which would make me happy, to be honest) but I think it's also a culture of the current workforce. I organize educational opportunities (many offer CE credit) as part of my job as well as community outreach programs and I get almost zero participation. The only time people show up is if you make it super-mandatory (uh-huh, I said it- mandatory doesn't mean diddly anymore) and pay them. You'd think nurses would want to learn, keep up to date with new info, etc, but in my experience people just want to come in, do the job they're [under]paid for, and go home. No extra, even if it helps them.
    We do indeed want to learn.

    But you might want to check out a few things before making such a blanket statement, like:

    1. WHAT are these programs?

    Are your CE opportunities applicable to the nurses you are hoping to present to? As an example, I had to attend a "mandatory" training last week on trach care and new documentation for the hospital... even though my floor now no longer accepts anyone with trachs.

    2. WHEN are these programs?

    We are seriously short staffed at the moment, with 4 positions open on the unit. During my shift, I can't even leave the floor to go to my car ... never mind attend a workshop. AFTER a shift? I need a break. I pick up a lot of OT to help out the unit and any time spent away is needed. 1x/month (4 hrs) for my residency meetings are enough, and those start at 8a ... which mean I have to get up around 6a when I came home 12:30a the night before from (you guessed it) work.

    In fact, just looking at some CE/workshop/training/etc, they all seem to start at 8a. This sucks if you're going to bed around 1a (that is, if you leave on time that night).

    Like purple roses, I'm a new nurse and I'm constantly looking things up, reading into things ... in the comfort of my home.

    And yes, I like to get paid.
  4. by   not.done.yet
    Even if I were receptive and felt safe in doing this (how is telling someone I am struggling emotionally with my job at work safe?? It's not.), I can't imagine when I would have TIME during my shift for this. I also can't imagine wanting to give up my 30 minutes to myself during my 12-14 hours to talk about the stressful stuff that has been stressing me out all day. Nope. I want to pee. I want to eat. I want to rest and think about something else.
  5. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from Purple_roses
    That being said, I do look things up on my own at home. While in a t-shirt and undies all snuggled up on my bed with my cat and a bowl of ice cream.
    Are we the same person?
  6. by   jodispamodi
    I have to agree with others, I feel as if speaking with an "inside" person would mean less confidentiality, and I guess for me when I saw that person (psychologist) on the unit it would remind me of my mistake and I would feel embarrassed and humiliated all over again.
  7. by   Purple_roses
    Quote from Julius Seizure
    Are we the same person?
    Haha! Basically if I'm wearing pants, I had better be getting paid for it
  8. by   3ringnursing
    I delivered my baby at a hospital I didn't work at to keep a healthy distance between work-medical and personal-medical. No way I wanted someone I knew seeing me in a compromising situation. Period.

    I had the opportunity to select a PCP amongst the many providers at my current employer for reduced health costs. No way, I'll gladly pay extra for my privacy. Although our EMR is protected health information, it's really not. I have a coworker that takes every opportunity to scour other employee's EMR's (including providers) when she is given the chance to do so, and she can't keep a secret even if her life depended on it.

    So, no, I would not divulge in a BH coworker. Paranoia is alive and well.

    I'm genuinely curious, and not trying to be inflammatory, but want to ask the same question to you: would you divulge your problems to a coworker psychologist you work with?
  9. by   Purple_roses
    Quote from 3ringnursing
    I delivered my baby at a hospital I didn't work at to keep a healthy distance between work-medical and personal-medical. No way I wanted someone I knew seeing me in a compromising situation. Period.

    I had the opportunity to select a PCP amongst the many providers at my current employer for reduced health costs. No way, I'll gladly pay extra for my privacy. Although our EMR is protected health information, it's really not. I have a coworker that takes every opportunity to scour other employee's EMR's (including providers) when she is given the chance to do so, and she can't keep a secret even if her life depended on it.

    So, no, I would not divulge in a BH coworker. Paranoia is alive and well.

    I'm genuinely curious, and not trying to be inflammatory, but want to ask the same question to you: would you divulge your problems to a coworker psychologist you work with?
    I'm shocked your coworker hasn't been fired yet? I mean you could bring that to the BON and her license could (and should be) revoked. If it's well-known that she does this and if she's revealed private health info to others as well, you could report her and she wouldn't be able to pinpoint who ratted her out.

    Some people are just so disgusting. I cannot even fathom how any person, a nurse much less, could do that without their conscious gnawing at them the whole time. To peek at that info and then talk about it with others.

    So yes OP, there you have it. Healthcare work environments can be downright scary.
  10. by   Daisy Joyce
    Fear of being ratted out to the higher ups.
    Fear of looking inept or weak to a co-worker (that means you).
    There is a stigma attached to needing help.

    You might be perfectly lovely and compassionate and have great ideas, but you are still a co-worker, and your paycheck is signed by the bosses, and not the nurse-client.
  11. by   Medic/Nurse
    Quote from 3ringnursing
    .... Although our EMR is protected health information, it's really not. I have a coworker that takes every opportunity to scour other employee's EMR's (including providers) when she is given the chance to do so, and she can't keep a secret even if her life depended on it.

    ^^^^ This is why HIPAA Prisons were built & are staffed like a freaking Supermax (or should be)! Actually, those fines can be meaningful too. As can exclusion from CMS facilities (so most everywhere) and professional license discipline. And once someone gets fired, well shift that paradigm.

    Next time this Nosey-Ass Co-Worker did this, I'd make certain I had the meddler dead to rights here - being clear on date/time/terminal ID & the activity well documented. I'd make sure corporate compliance was made aware. I might even report to the Feds (HHS) if this person is "special" to management. Cause damn.

    I'd shut that $#!% down in a heartbeat. Actually, half a heartbeat. Like R on T half heartbeat - but, I'm not very tolerant of these type of shenanigans.

    All EMRs leave electronic "breadcrumbs" - meaning IT can positively identify via logon/terminal ID who accessed the record, how long, what they looked at, any change or entry, if anything was printed or emailed.

    This is a big deal. If this was my employer and my med info was "breached" in this manner & I found out, I'd bring action against the person & facility just to ensure that this never happened again.

    Folks --- also LESSON cause there are folks like this --- always LOG OUT when you step away from a terminal or access point. Wow.

  12. by   3ringnursing
    Quote from Medic/Nurse
    ^^^^ This is why HIPAA Prisons were built & are staffed like a freaking Supermax (or should be)! Actually, those fines can be meaningful too. As can exclusion from CMS facilities (so most everywhere) and professional license discipline. And once someone gets fired, well shift that paradigm.

    Next time this Nosey-Ass Co-Worker did this, I'd make certain I had the meddler dead to rights here - being clear on date/time/terminal ID & the activity well documented. I'd make sure corporate compliance was made aware. I might even report to the Feds (HHS) if this person is "special" to management. Cause damn.

    I'd shut that $#!% down in a heartbeat. Actually, half a heartbeat. Like R on T half heartbeat - but, I'm not very tolerant of these type of shenanigans.

    All EMRs leave electronic "breadcrumbs" - meaning IT can positively identify via logon/terminal ID who accessed the record, how long, what they looked at, any change or entry, if anything was printed or emailed.

    This is a big deal. If this was my employer and my med info was "breached" in this manner & I found out, I'd bring action against the person & facility just to ensure that this never happened again.

    Folks --- also LESSON cause there are folks like this --- always LOG OUT when you step away from a terminal or access point. Wow.


    Sadly, many of us work from home. I never witness it, but I've heard about it after the fact. Hearsay. My word against a special, special snowflake.

    I fiercely guard my pt's (and at times coworker's, or their family) EMR's like I would my own. That s!∆* is private!
  13. by   3ringnursing
    Quote from JKL33
    Regarding the original topic, I echo J. Seizure.


    Maybe you should seek to simply develop trusted and friendly relationships with staff on the ward and offer care over time? Just sort of "become" someone, over time, whom they will approach casually with issues that crop up. I think your position (at least as far as the staff is concerned) would be better utilized as simply a resource present on the ward whom anyone can casually and informally interact with - - not as someone with whom staff makes an appointment and goes to for "therapy."

    Now that I'm thinking about it that might be a very helpful thing.

    We had a priest at a VA I worked at years ago. He carefully established relationships over a period of time, came around and spoke to those whom wanted to speak to him (almost everyone) and was a good, nonjudgmental source of comfort for many. He didn't pry, ask about your mother, or do anything remotely threatening.

    When 9/11 blew up in the world's face he was there. Many (including me) leaned on him as a source of comfort - I'm not even Catholic. But he was a trustable, likable guy that exuded bonhomie, and good will.

    I had no reservations discussing many things with him in my very limited time.

    This was a very special type of relationship with a very unique person. The VA was his "church" and we were all his charges. This isn't something easily replicated - he had it down to an art form.

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