Why not manage nurses like professionals?

  1. I'm 10 months into my second career as a registered nurse. In my previous career I managed departments of people for 20 years. If I had treated and managed my department co-workers as I've seen professional nurses treated I would have been doing the job all alone!

    Is it just me or is there a super CNA mentality to how professional nurses are managed? I've seen nurses reprimanded in public, scheduled to work days they were to be off without being asked, reprimanded for not "punching out" for lunch, and on and on and on.

    Finding out these things has been the biggest "downer" of my career change. I'm one who works extra when needed, arrives on time, does my work with compassion and skill and works as part of a team. I've been in environments where there is no team. When you take lunch you also answer your call lights during your lunch. Our ER send patients to just before shift change to clear their area for their shift. When asked why we don't talk about this I'm told "It's just the way it has always been".
    I've not seen nurses discussing patients between themselves to gain or share knowledge.
    I'm in shock at these situations within the profession. I've considered just getting enough experience to go Home Health. Anyone addressing these issues?

    Where does the timeclock mentality apply to professionals.
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   underpaidrn
    Quote from kstaffeil
    i'm 10 months into my second career as a registered nurse. in my previous career i managed departments of people for 20 years. if i had treated and managed my department co-workers as i've seen professional nurses treated i would have been doing the job all alone!

    is it just me or is there a super cna mentality to how professional nurses are managed? i've seen nurses reprimanded in public, scheduled to work days they were to be off without being asked, reprimanded for not "punching out" for lunch, and on and on and on.

    finding out these things has been the biggest "downer" of my career change. i'm one who works extra when needed, arrives on time, does my work with compassion and skill and works as part of a team. i've been in environments where there is no team. when you take lunch you also answer your call lights during your lunch. our er send patients to just before shift change to clear their area for their shift. when asked why we don't talk about this i'm told "it's just the way it has always been".
    i've not seen nurses discussing patients between themselves to gain or share knowledge.
    i'm in shock at these situations within the profession. i've considered just getting enough experience to go home health. anyone addressing these issues?

    where does the timeclock mentality apply to professionals.

    it's hard to believe how i have seen nurses treated over the years. i always told myself that when i got into management, i would never treat my staff like i have been treated over the years. i have been in an administrative position for over 10 years and treat people with courtesy and respect. i am no pushover and expect things to be done, but there is a right way and a wrong way to deal with people. i have never discussed anything in front of other staff. it was always in a closed door session and was not a yelling match. more of a how can we work this out type of situation. as far as nurses not talking about patients anymore, well you can't really blame them with all of these hipaa laws out there. you're almost afraid to open your mouth. as long as the majority of nurses puts up with antiquated employment practices, nothing will change. i'm only one person and i can make a difference in my home health company, but not any where else. best of luck to you.
  4. by   kstaffeil
    Thanks for getting back to me! I have another question.. If I would specialize in LTC, Rehab, geriatrics this early in my career how would I get the ACLS and additonal clinical experience I need?
  5. by   underpaidrn
    LTC and acute rehabs have the same problems as hospitals. Most of the time in LTCs you are going to lose some of your nursing skills because you don't have a high acuity level of patient. You can get ACLS training through your local rescue squads. Around here, they offer courses for medical staff. You can also check with the hospitals. If you can, stay where you are at for a while longer and get that year of experience, minimum, then start looking at home health. The wide variety of patients would interest you. Best of luck and let us know how you made out.

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