Why LPN??

  1. i often wondered why some people choose to become an lpn verses an rn, or why go for a 2 year program and just not go for 2 more years to get your bs? especially with the threatened lpn layoffs, the lower pay, the limited employment choices. is it money? is it wanting to get your ability to work sooner? please enlighten me. thanks.


    moderators note: this thread was started on march 3, 2001. so please, if you should find yourself taking offense to a post or inclined to qoute or otherwise address a posters comments directly consider the age of the post you are replying to. -thanks, nancy
    Last edit by kids on Aug 4, '03
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  2. 172 Comments

  3. by   C.LO
    I feel that LPN's are not neccessary for patient health care. I understand the rationale for certain hospitals to eradicate LPN's. I feel they are more of an added responsiblity to the R.N. Now concerning 2 year programs, I feel that some of the best nurses have come out of those programs. I graduated from a 2 yr program and continued on for my B.S.N. and it was an excellent transition for me. I do not regret my path, and I feel as If the 2 yr program prepared me more for the clinical responsiblity as a RN.
  4. by   iris
    How dare you make the idea of becoming an LPN
    sound like it's a waste of time. You think having that RN title make you a better nurse.
    Why should any one of us enlighten you to what we choose to do!!! What makes you think just because your an "RN" that makes you a better nurse....What nerve. How about, just wanting to be an LPN,that may be just enough for some of us.
    I'm curious to know where on earth are they laying off LPN's. I've yet to meet one LPN that's in need of a job. And as far as low pay... I don't think so. Out of my entire
    graduating class, I'm the lowest paid LPN that I know. That's because I choose to work in a hospital environment. Making 17.50-25.00 if not more an hour doesn't sound to bad to me. So get off your high horse and stop looking down on all that's in the health care business. For all you "INSECURE RN" get with it. Times a changing and its only going to make you more frustrated. So if you can't handle all the change in the medical field, it's probably time for you to look else where. You're frightend by the LPN's, EMT's, OR Techs, and even NA. Sometimes I don't know whether to laugh or to get angry by some of the comments made in this forum. But, thank goodness the majority of you RN's are level headed and have a great deal of common sense and a great respect for the medical field, that they
    know it takes all kinds to make this a great system. It's only that handful that makes it bad the the rest.
  5. by   Q.
    Woah, Iris, cool your defenses. It appears that you may be the insecure one that can't even discuss your role in healthcare. I challenge you to point out to me where I mentioned that LPNs are useless or that I am am above them for having an RN. Also, if you open your mind, you may realize that in SEVERAL areas of the country, LPNs are being laid off left and right, and in fact, is being discussed in some other posts on this very bulletin board. You make quite a bit for an LPN - RNs in my area don't make that without overtime, hon, so, hence, my ASKING about LPNs rather than ASSUMING, which is what you did. I seriously wanted to know what prompts people to go the LPN route, IN LIGHT of the layoffs, and limited employment opportunities. A simple, "I never want to leave the bedside" or "I just don't have the desire to be an RN because......" or "I prefer to work under an RN" or "when I chose to be an LPN there wasn't lay offs, etc" would suffice. Drop your defenses Iris and get more secure in your own self before bashing others.
  6. by   C.LO
    Right on Suzy K!!! I fully agree!!
  7. by   Sunshine55
    Suzy your question was not out of line. But, C.LO's response to Iris was nasty and uncalled for. I became an LPN due to time restrictions, finances, having an 8 year old and a new baby and an impending divorce. I have never had an interest in hospital nursing which is the only area I'm aware of that has laid off LPN's. I have worked in long term care on a 42 bed skilled nursing floor. Myself and another LPN were in charge. Also, worked in an OB-GYN group practice. Also, worked in home health care. Lastly, worked in a group home for the developmentally disabled. Rarely, have I needed the assistance of an RN in order to perform my duties because of my expertise and professionalism. I saved them a lot of work and this allowed them to tackle other duties. I've received compliments from team members in all disciplines and the patients, too. Once, I even saved the lives of 12 individuals by evacuating due to a faulty furnace repair - carbon monoxide level was at the deadly level in the basement. Even received a commendation for my work as a preceptor for 3 new graduate LPN's after being an LPN myself for only 6 months. I know I'm needed when patients specifically request me because I always manage to make time for them. In many areas of nursing LPN's are a necessity.
  8. by   duckie
    I actually had two reasons for becoming an LPN. First, I really thought nursing was what I wanted to do but having never done it, wasn't sure and figured if it wasn't, then it wouldn't be as expensive or take as long to find out. My main reason was because I had quite school when I was only 16, so my education was very limited and I was afraid I couldn't cut it education wise. But thank the dear Lord, I did very good in school and once I got into it, I liked where I was and what I was doing and just didn't feel the need to go on. If I were younger and didn't need to work full time, I would get my RN now, but only for the reasons of when I get too old to cut the long hours and then I could go into teaching, which I love to do even now. I really enjoy showing the new nurses the ropes. Even though I have lots of experience I cannot teach and that makes me sad. But I'll keep plugging away until I can't hobble down those long halls anymore. I think the war between LPN's and RN's is truly a waste of good energy. This profession is big enough for all of us and we are all very much needed. I have never had problems finding a job and I am thankful for what I can do.
  9. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by Susy K:
    I often wondered why some people choose to become an LPN verses an RN, or why go for a 2 year program and just not go for 2 more years to get your BS? Especially with the threatened LPN layoffs, the lower pay, the limited employment choices. Is it money? Is it wanting to get your ability to work sooner? Please enlighten me. Thanks.
    Thank you Susy K, for asking, rather than assuming. I find this very refreshing, after seeing posts full of wrong assumptions.
    When I came into nursing, I didn't intend to do it as a profession, but as a way to gain more knowledge to take care of my child who was very ill during the first two yrs of her life. After sending 60 days in an NICU, and almost losing her, I went to school, the next month after she received a trach. I probably would have went to an RN program, if my ex hadn't been the military. The LPN program was 15 mos long, and the RN program 24 mos. As we were transferred after only one yr most times, I felt I could handle 3 mos. without his help, but not 1yr., if he was transferred before I completed school. But when I graduated, and started working in the NICU, I realized, I had finally found my niche! After one year, I was making more than some RNs, while working per diem, and functioning in the newly started primary care modules, with my own pts, obtaining orders, doing pt. assessments, and being responsible for my actions, but also keeping the charge nurse, fully informed of any changes necessary. During my many years of nursing, I didn't then, nor have I now ever had any problems finding a job, as my references are excellent, and glowing, from the RNs I have worked with, who saw me as an assest, not a hinderance. The pay I receive as a travel nurse is the same or more than "some" RN staff nurses, and even "some" RN travelers. Also ,it has always puzzled me, as to why some nurses, take the time to get their BSNs, MSNs, or become NP, but I never hear them asked why they didn't become doctors. Everyone has someone above, or below them on the totem pole, and we all can't, nor should we all wish to be at the top. I can remember working in hospitals, that only allowed BSN, or MSN nurses to be in charge of a floor. I would later see those same nurses, come back to the floor, as they discovered being at the "top" wasn't for them. A person must be true to their own calling, and their own comfort level. The level of ones career, and or their aspirations shouldn't be determined, or defined by anyone, but themselves. Nor should they be discouraged from staying at their level of comfort, unless they perform poorly in their positions. If the opportunities exist for them to work at the level they wish, then by all means they should be allowed to do so. There are many RNs,LPNs,CNAs, and others, who should have never even came into the field, let alone have progressed beyond their initial levels of education. For the record, my top pay now is up to $28.00/hr plus mileage, which tops out at $31.00/hr per diem, or $23.00/hr plus travel of $182.00 a week!
    P. S., the later includes a FREE, fully furnished apartment, utilities, benefits, and much more! And as for hospitals getting rid of LPNs, I have seen them do it, and seem them regret it. This is part of the reason I have no trouble getting travel assignments, as most hospitals when they decided to get them back, couldn't find enough, or those with acute care experience.
    So although I'm deeply saddened by anyone having to lose their job, I'm glad the hospital's payback, is to have to pay us, a lot more than the LPN/LVNs they losted.
    Brownie


    [This message has been edited by Brownms46 (edited March 26, 2001).]
  10. by   oramar
    I bet you do not know how old this question really is. Nearly 35 years ago when I was only 18 my family doctor gave me a real hard time about the fact that I was going to a LPN school instead of a Diploma nursing school. He said it was a waste of time. He was a middle class professional person who could not comprehend the economic realities of a girl child from a poor blue collar family. It is the same with many of these people who heap derision on the heads of ADN grads. Most ADN grads are from more economically modest situations than BSN programs, they are older and usually have children. A BSN program in one huge gulp is not a possibility for most 30 year olds with a couple of kids. I would recommend that a youngster with doting parents who can give them financial support go to a BSN program. It is easier and cheaper to get you LPN, get a job somewhere that offers tuition assistance and go to a ADN program if you are poor. Matter of fact many, many people follow just this career tract. Right now nursing education is gastly expensive. However, more help from the goverment could be forthcomming very soon.
  11. by   iamme457
    As an ADN degree nurse I agree on the financial reasons for becoming what you can afford at the time in money and time involved. Many facilities will assist you financially with furthering your education.
  12. by   morningwind
    Originally posted by Brownms46:
    Thank you Susy K, for asking, rather than assuming. I find this very refreshing, after seeing posts full of wrong assumptions.
    When I came into nursing, I didn't intend to do it as a profession, but as a way to gain more knowledge to take care of my child who was very ill during the first two yrs of her life. After sending 60 days in an NICU, and almost losing her, I went to school, the next month after she received a trach. I probably would have went to an RN program, if my ex hadn't been the military. The LPN program was 15 mos long, and the RN program 24 mos. As we were transferred after only one yr most times, I felt I could handle 3 mos. without his help, but not 1yr., if he was transferred before I completed school. But when I graduated, and started working in the NICU, I realized, I had finally found my niche! After one year, I was making more than some RNs, while working per diem, and functioning in the newly started primary care modules, with my own pts, obtaining orders, doing pt. assessments, and being responsible for my actions, but also keeping the charge nurse, fully informed of any changes necessary. During my many years of nursing, I didn't then, nor have I now ever had any problems finding a job, as my references are excellent, and glowing, from the RNs I have worked with, who saw me as an assest, not a hinderance. The pay I receive as a travel nurse is the same or more than "some" RN staff nurses, and even "some" RN travelers. Also ,it has always puzzled me, as to why some nurses, take the time to get their BSNs, MSNs, or become NP, but I never hear them asked why they didn't become doctors. Everyone has someone above, or below them on the totem pole, and we all can't, nor should we all wish to be at the top. I can remember working in hospitals, that only allowed BSN, or MSN nurses to be in charge of a floor. I would later see those same nurses, come back to the floor, as they discovered being at the "top" wasn't for them. A person must be true to their own calling, and their own comfort level. The level of ones career, and or their aspirations shouldn't be determined, or defined by anyone, but themselves. Nor should they be discouraged from staying at their level of comfort, unless they perform poorly in their positions. If the opportunities exist for them to work at the level they wish, then by all means they should be allowed to do so. There are many RNs,LPNs,CNAs, and others, who should have never even came into the field, let alone have progressed beyond their initial levels of education. For the record, my top pay now is up to $28.00/hr plus mileage, which tops out at $31.00/hr per diem, or $23.00/hr plus travel of $182.00 a week!
    P. S., the later includes a FREE, fully furnished apartment, utilities, benefits, and much more! And as for hospitals getting rid of LPNs, I have seen them do it, and seem them regret it. This is part of the reason I have no trouble getting travel assignments, as most hospitals when they decided to get them back, couldn't find enough, or those with acute care experience.
    So although I'm deeply saddened by anyone having to lose their job, I'm glad the hospital's payback, is to have to pay us, a lot more than the LPN/LVNs they losted.
    Brownie


    [This message has been edited by Brownms46 (edited March 26, 2001).]
    right on and very well put. I was very hurt when I read the first post on this situation. The RN's that I work with at my local hospital do not see me or any LPN as a hinderance, but an asset. I have only been at this for 1 year, but it has been a lifelong goal. I was a CNA/CMA for years until I could see to it my son had the education he needed and wanted. When that was a reality, I started on mine. I will pursue my ADn at some time, but right now I am happy. If it means loosing the patient contact that I have, then I may never do it. I do all things except hang blood products, and give IV meds that an RN can do. That is the only difference between us (and 1 year of education, and NCLEX-RN) I work with my RN and do all that I can to help her. Sometimes a mature LPN is worth as much as a young RN when it comes to decision making. This profession is hard enough without the battle between the titles. We all need to work together.
  13. by   hannabear1
    I have been in the nursing field for 7 years. I started out as a CNA which I obtained through a job-training program paid for by the state. It was the only way I could afford training. After a few years working in geriatrics, I felt I needed a change, to do more than what I was doing. So I decided to go back to school. It was a struggle-having to work and manage school at the same time. I worked in SICU with heart patients for a little while during school until after the third semester of an ADN program and obtained my LPN license. I did finish the program but was able to work as an LPN with better pay. I have since then been continuing to work as an LPN through an agency which is very good pay, and I am able to make my own schedule and not have to deal with the politics that go on within the facilities. Right now I am struggling to try and pass my RN state boards. I am working with geriatrics because in my area the hospitals do not hire LPNs. I have been at one facility pretty regularly over the past few months-I actually am a former employee there so it makes it nice to see familiar faces. As I am there, they have RNs, LPNs, CNAs, and Unit Aides. To tell you the honest truth, I don't really see a big difference between an LPN and an RN-there are LPNs there who are in charge because there aren't enough RNs. In my opinion, if it weren't for LPNs, who would fill the positions to take care of the people? also I feel that LPNs are a big help to RNs in that they save RNs a lot of time. I know that working as an LPN until I pass my boards will only increase my understanding and respect of how important LPNs, CNAs, and Unit aides are. It is definitely true that we are all here to help take care of our clients, to work as a team-THAT IS THE POINT!! So all you veteran LPNs and new LPNs-don't ever let anyone tell you that it is a waste of time.....
  14. by   theboss
    man, what is up with the old rn,lpn junk!!!!i am an lpn and have been for 6 years. i am currently working in the er and have been there for 3 years, and not as a tech or just taking vs and cleaning up pts.. i am also acls and pals certified ,and plan to get my rn license in the future!!! for now being a mother is more important!!!! i dont know about the rest of you lpn,s but i also work under my own license not just the rns.dont worry lpns i wont forget where i came from.. by law the only thing an lpn cannot do is hang blood...in oklahoma anyway..i do everything the rns do ..the only difference is they get paid more money..at my job i am highly respected for my nursing abilities,i have been told by rns,doctors, and management that i am a very good nurse and an assest to there er. this is because of the people i work. i have been taught by the best without prejudice.the rns and lpns i work with are awesome, and have been in the buisness for years , you can say that they have seen it all,the nurses i work with are proud to work with the lpns and encourage the best in us.. we work as a team ..this is because they are professional and have respect for nursing...so all of you rns who have a problem or feel threatened by the lpns, get over yourselves because the lpns are here to stay...just because your initials say rn doesnt mean you should be one..take lessons from the rns,lpns that are better than you, you just might learn something, to everyone reading this message you know who you are.. there was a question of why an lpn, well there are many reasons, same question why an rn, when it comes down to it, it really doesnt matter, what ever we decide to be for what ever reasons, we should be the best and most professional that we can be. the day any nurse thinks that they know it all then they become dangerous,...to all the rns who are professional thankyou and hold your head up high..for all the lpns just be the best nurse you can be and further your education if you can if not thats cool too.. hospitols around the states are laying off rns and lpns not just one or the other and for many different reasons..there is enough pain in the world we shouldnt cause it amongst each other..thankyou alicia




    [This message has been edited by theboss (edited March 26, 2001).]

    [This message has been edited by theboss (edited March 26, 2001).]

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