Why LPN?? - page 12

i often wondered why some people choose to become an lpn verses an rn, or why go for a 2 year program and just not go for 2 more years to get your bs? especially with the threatened lpn layoffs, the... Read More

  1. by   mattsmom81
    I agree with Oramar...anyone who reads other posters stories and opinions on this board should have insight as to why many of us attended LPN school (or ADN or Diploma) vs a 4 year degree.

    I just can't help but wonder why it is being brought up again...maybe just another disguised 'argument' ..er.. debate? RN vs LPN, 4 year RN vs lowly ADN Diplomas...here we go again <sigh>.

    Perhaps some here should try and understand the tiresomeness of these 'debates'. Particularly when they always seem to hurt feelings and generate tension. JMHO.
  2. by   JMP
    LDUTCH!!!!
    OH MY GOD!!!! do you realize that the post you are refering to from C.LO was posted 2 years ago!!!??????????????

    This person has not subsequently posted on this board since 2001!!!!!

    Why oh why does this persist in this manner!!??!?????!?????

    ALl this talk about hanging blood-skill orientated things!! dropping NG tubes is TOTAL a waste of time. In my opinion.... these things are irrelevant to the original post, which was a question, that I am sure was answered long ago, like two years ago, about why someone would choose one educational route over another.

    Lets move on..and yes, I realize that by posting this message I am futhering this thread....but man oh man, some days these types of posts are harder to pass over than others.

    Can I add one more thing!!? Skills do NOT MAKE a nurse. You can teach anyone to do almost anything..... lets understand that there are many ways of doing things, BUT as long as you reach the desired outcome and have good technique.... and you can back up your technique with logic...then it is OK. You need to understand the principals BEHIND what you are doing, the potential outcomes and YES I WILL SAY IT...here it comes......... you need to use critical thinking.

    OK I am done.
  3. by   lduch
    Originally posted by JMP
    LDUTCH!!!!
    OH MY GOD!!!! do you realize that the post you are refering to from C.LO was posted 2 years ago!!!??????????????

    This person has not subsequently posted on this board since 2001!!!!!

    Why oh why does this persist in this manner!!??!?????!?????

    ALl this talk about hanging blood-skill orientated things!! dropping NG tubes is TOTAL a waste of time. In my opinion.... these things are irrelevant to the original post, which was a question, that I am sure was answered long ago, like two years ago, about why someone would choose one educational route over another.

    Lets move on..and yes, I realize that by posting this message I am futhering this thread....but man oh man, some days these types of posts are harder to pass over than others.

    Can I add one more thing!!? Skills do NOT MAKE a nurse. You can teach anyone to do almost anything..... lets understand that there are many ways of doing things, BUT as long as you reach the desired outcome and have good technique.... and you can back up your technique with logic...then it is OK. You need to understand the principals BEHIND what you are doing, the potential outcomes and YES I WILL SAY IT...here it comes......... you need to use critical thinking.

    OK I am done.
    Okay you got me,, but I'm new to this board and I've never been on a board that has 2 YEAR OLD posts STILL on it, so I assumed it was still pretty new. So excuse me,okay? So what if it's been 2 years since she posted that. There are still a lot of RN's out there with that mentality towards LPN's. If there
    is any RN on here that feels the way she does, I would like to know why they feel this way.

    "Why does this persist in this manner?" What manner are you referring too? If you are meaning why the subject got off the original post, well this is a discussion board and many different discussion can branch off of one simple question. You don't have to like it. Other than that, I don't know what you mean by saying,"why does this persist in this manner?"


    QUOTE: "Skills do NOT MAKE a nurse. You can teach anyone to do almost anything..... lets understand that there are many ways of doing things, BUT as long as you reach the desired outcome and have good technique.... and you can back up your technique with logic...then it is OK. You need to understand the principals BEHIND what you are doing, the potential outcomes and YES I WILL SAY IT...here it comes......... you need to use critical thinking."

    You are exactly right and LPN's are just as capable of this as RN's.

    Another QUOTE: "OK, I'm done." Well good! And that's DUCH not Dutch, thank you.
  4. by   MarcusKspn
    I am actually working my way up the ranks of nursing, starting as a Nurses Aid 2 1/2 years ago, then as a med aide, now in LPN school and going on to RN school. The reason I started out as an CNA was to get experience in the field and to see if I would like in nursing before I invested all the time and money in the program. I am now in LPN school because it is only a one year program. I get to work in the field and specialty area that I want to work in while I go to RN school. As for wasting time most RN programs in this state give you a year credit for being an LPN so I'm not wasting or losing any time by being an LPN first. And by slowly working up the ladder in nursing and performing the jobs of all the "lower" nursing carrers I not only get a feel and understanding and respect for those other nurses and aides, but when I graduate from RN school I will be able to say that I have 3 years of experience in Bedside care, 2 years experience in handing out mecications, 1 year experience as an LPN, compared to the RN who only went straight to RN school and has no experience. Plus I will earn an LPN wage while going to RN school (which beats working at 7/11). On another note I seriously recomend to ANY RN student to go to LPN school first. At my hospital where I work the RN students get 2 weeks worth of clinicals and the LPN students get 5 months. We get a lot more hands on experience during our school. And a lot of us have to show the RN students how to perform most skills. I don't mean to say that RN students have a worse programm. But being a degree program they have to take lots on non-nursing related classes. The SN at our hospitals can tell you everything out of the book, they are the smartest people I know, but they just don't have the time for the hands on experience. Another reason why I went to LPN school first.
  5. by   jlsand
    Just wanted to say that some of the best nurses I have ever worked with were LPN's. In fact, where I work now, we don't use LPN's and I wish we did sometimes! With this nursing shortage, it would make sense to me to use LPN's more, not less. By the way, some of us didn't have a lot of money to continue our education. I worked up from NA, to CNA, to LPN, to RN, ADN and will probably up to BSN and even my MSN at some future date. I don't regret it at all. I feel I'm a better nurse because of it!

    John' blog
  6. by   opalmRN
    Here's a thought.

    Why does anyone choose the profession they do?

    Why aren't we all Waitresses, or Lawyers or for that matter why aren't all Lawyers corporate lawyers rather than criminal, judicial, child, labor etc.

    I think the answer to this as well as the original question is obvious.

    Different strokes for different folks. If the healthcare system didn't need LPNs there wouldn't be thousands of job openings for LPN positions. It's all a matter of choices and interests it's not a big mystery.

    C
  7. by   JMP
    duch

    FYI at the bottom of EVERY post is a date. Threads like this can live on due to someone recently posting them.

    My point about skills is this.... some skills are not appropriate for LPN's. WHy you make ask? Due to the educational background that each aquire.

    That is why there is a difference between levels of responsbility, pay ect.

    SKills can be taught, but just like a CNA can not pass out meds like a LPN, LPN's can not do certain things that a RN can just like a RN cannot do some things a NP can do.

    It is what goes on behind the "skill" in question. You see?

    I find you defensive and if you are new on this board you will have a hard time when your attitude reflects such behaviour.
  8. by   lilnurse2b
    Well, as per the difference between the two, I can tell you it certainly is a hard decision to make. In Florida, RN school is full-time which makes it hard to have a job (full- or part-time) on the side. LPN school is less expensive, and you have a choice to go full-time (13 months) or part-time (21 months), allowing you to have a full-time job. My problem with going to school part-time for LPN is that LPN's earn a certificate only. My logic, is this: If I'm going to go to school for TWO YEARS, and spend ALL THAT MONEY, I'd darned-well better earn a degree for it! But then again, it's the viscious cycle - I'll have to give up my job at the School Board if I want to go for RN and earn that degree. I don't think either title (RN / LPN) is any less competent than the other. LPN school here is $3,000 for the entire course. RN school costs roughly $7,000. Of course, financial aid is available, but then again, which should I choose? I really agree it depends on the person's financial situation at the time. I personally think it's unrealistic for schools to make all these classes "full-time" and not expect the students to have a job - people have bills to pay!! I know people have gone through Nursing School with full-time jobs AND full-time schooling... some, even full-time parents too! I just know that I couldn't handle it all at once. For me, it either has to be part-time school and full-time job (LPN) or quit the job, and go full-time to school (RN). Either way I go, I want to be a specialized RN and work in O.R. Sometimes I just feel like it's going to take me FOREVER to be a nurse! HEEEEEELPPP!! What should I do?
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    All i can say is i hope my PATIENTS do not see me as "unecessary" in healthcare. And that i REALLY hate superiority complexes from those that think because they have the "higher degree" that they are either the better nurse or the better person. That will be all i will say here for the simple fact that there's another thread that i want to read besides the same old war between the ranks that will ALWAYS go on and on. :angryfire
  10. by   mjmcwo
    I will be entering a nursing program in the fall that is 2 years of labs and clinicals geared towards RN qualification. They also have an acceleration program for those LPN that wish to enhance their degree. I have in florida, a brother and sister in law who are both LPN and a sister in mass who is an RN. Each has had different experiences throughout their careers and are quite happy with their choices. Bottom line to them is the patient.
  11. by   ceridwyn
    What provocative questions posted at first on this forum. We fixed this problem here in this state when the nurses board called everyone Registered Nurses, then put them in Divisions, so a Rn would be Rn Division 1. Lpn - Rn Division 2. Chips on shoulders gone, problem solved most of the time. Everyone, LPn, Rn, Bachelors degree, Masters, All called "Registered Nurses" - One team. No explanations to the public that do not know there are differing catagories of nurses.
  12. by   Monica RN,BSN
    Many individuals choose to become an LPN to continue on in the field of nursing. See, they can now make a decent living and have money to go on to RN school if they so desire. They have a fairly good income , get alot of practical on the job experiance and have a means to pay bills and have money for school, (maybe) well at least maybe decrease the amount they would need in school loans. LPN's Make great RN's as they have experiance in the field. Not to much different from CNA who works as a CNA while in nursing school. Thjey have an income and get good on the job exposure. CNA's make great nurses as well from being around the work, ect. Some of us just dont have the resources to spend two years or four years in school without a way to make some money to support self/ family/ ect....
  13. by   nursered
    I have just graduated LPN school and the reason I chose that route was because of the long waiting lists for RN school. I have been told that I have to wait until 2006 to get into the RN program. I am 44 years old, I may decide not to take RN at all and take another degree course instead.

    The advantage (my opinion) is that once you have your LPN, you are half way to RN. If someone drops out of the RN program, then there is space for an LPN to step in. The pay as an LPN will help me to fund my schooling.

    A lot of the women in my class had children and they wanted to better their financial situation. I have a lot of respect for those ladies who worked full time, went to school full time and had small children at home.

    There are plenty of LPN jobs out there, although I have noticed that a lot of the hospitals in the area use well trained techs, EMTs/Paramedics and RN's and just cut out the LPN positions.

close